none
Steady State Snapshot/Image RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have Steady state installed on two of our public computers because they were constantly getting hosed and I got tired of re-imaging all the time.  So far it works great, we reboot, all changes are gone…

     

    Now my question:  I would like to be able to use this in an office environment but more like a snapshot of the way it was deployed on day one.  I would like to be able to have Steady State do its thing then allow the user to retain daily changes.  However, when the PC gets hose I want to be able to then tell Steady State to revert back to the snapshot it captured.

     

    Even though I tell my users to save everything to the mapped drives they still save some stuff to the Desktop…

     

    Can Steady State take, retain and restore a snapshot when I tell it to without wiping out everything at ever reboot?


    Thanx,


        Ilmar

    Friday, January 23, 2009 7:46 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Ilmar, you can choose "Retain changes temporarily" or "Retain all changes permanently" under this kind of situation.

     

    Retain Changes Temporarily

    You might want to retain user files and data for a specified period of time. For example, you might have a user who is working on a project and wants to access project research files over a period of two weeks. In this case, you would select the Retain changes temporarily option, and then set the date and time duration. Windows Disk Protection will not erase any changes when the computer restarts until the specified date and time are reached.

    When the specified date and time are reached, users receive a warning message stating that the next time the computer restarts, all changes will be cleared from the hard disk. This gives shared users an opportunity to save their files to a removable storage device before shutting down the computer.

    Retain All Changes Permanently

    After you turn on Windows Disk Protection, turning it off will delete the cache file, which is time consuming to create. When it is time to install patches, upgrades, or new programs, select the Retain all changes permanently option to prevent your modifications from being lost. Any action you perform while this option is selected will not be removed by Windows Disk Protection. Because the cache file still exists when this option is selected, you can easily return to one of the other two options without repeating the time-consuming process of turning on Windows Disk Protection.

     

    Hope this helps!

    Monday, January 26, 2009 8:38 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  •  

    Hi Ilmar, you can choose "Retain changes temporarily" or "Retain all changes permanently" under this kind of situation.

     

    Retain Changes Temporarily

    You might want to retain user files and data for a specified period of time. For example, you might have a user who is working on a project and wants to access project research files over a period of two weeks. In this case, you would select the Retain changes temporarily option, and then set the date and time duration. Windows Disk Protection will not erase any changes when the computer restarts until the specified date and time are reached.

    When the specified date and time are reached, users receive a warning message stating that the next time the computer restarts, all changes will be cleared from the hard disk. This gives shared users an opportunity to save their files to a removable storage device before shutting down the computer.

    Retain All Changes Permanently

    After you turn on Windows Disk Protection, turning it off will delete the cache file, which is time consuming to create. When it is time to install patches, upgrades, or new programs, select the Retain all changes permanently option to prevent your modifications from being lost. Any action you perform while this option is selected will not be removed by Windows Disk Protection. Because the cache file still exists when this option is selected, you can easily return to one of the other two options without repeating the time-consuming process of turning on Windows Disk Protection.

     

    Hope this helps!

    Monday, January 26, 2009 8:38 AM
    Moderator
  • I'd love to see that option too. Let's call my usercase "the digitally challenged mother-in-law with an authority and common sense challenged son (14y)."

    It would be great to be able to say "you messed up? Oh, well, we'll do a remote 'fresh install'. You're illegally downloaded games are down the sink? Great, let's call that a learning opportunity." :)

    Thursday, February 5, 2009 4:28 PM