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Does Service Pack 1 include all prior updates? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Issue:

    I would like a definitive answer:  Does Windows 7 Service Pack 1 include all prior updates?

    Why I ask:

    On many occasions I have either installed a copy of Windows 7 that does not include SP1, or, (more likely), I am restoring a client's machine to the "out-of-box" condition due to the fact that it had become such a Virus Museum that it was beyond all help.

    After install, or the factory restore, I run Windows Update set to "update Windows only" and I get something like 163 "Important" updates, one of which is SP1.  Correct me if I am wrong, but if SP1 rolls up all prior updates, why do I get both SP1 and 162 other updates as well?

    The way it occurs to me is that Windows Update should offer SP1, and after that is installed, then offer the updates that come after that point.

    I can un-check Service Pack 1, install all the other updates, and then select SP1 in a subsequent update cycle where it appears by itself.  If the "other" updates were released after SP1, wouldn't installing SP1 afterward, "un-do" the other updates?  Of course, after I install SP1, subsequent update cycles show several zillion other updates as well.

    What I usually end up doing is install SP1 manually, and then run Windows Update to fill in what was not captured.

    Am I missing something?

    (Wishful Thinking)  I would **LOOOVE** to be able to download one update that would take my installation from where it is at that point in time to present date in one fell swoop.  As it is, I usually spend something like a day and a half updating to present date. . . . (/Wishful Thinking)

    Accept my apologies if this has been asked before, but after 30 minutes of searching, I did not find anything even remotely similar.

    Thanks again for all your help!

    Jim (JR)

    Friday, September 19, 2014 2:03 AM

Answers

  • Yes, Service packs contains previously released updates, that helps make Windows more reliable.It includes previously released security, performance, and stability updates that have been rolled out. When you install a SP, the binaries\files gets updated, that's why you get more updates post SP installation. 

    Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    • Proposed as answer by Carey FrischMVP Sunday, September 21, 2014 10:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Monday, September 22, 2014 2:09 AM
    Friday, September 19, 2014 2:30 AM
  • In addition to Arnav Sharma's suggestion, kindly note that there are some updates post SP1 that requires SP1 as prerequisite. Hence, only after installing SP1, such updates can be installed.

    Updates are created frequently to keep the PC secure and stable. Hence, we can't predict a solid point where all the updates are present. For example, if SP2 is released it'll contain all the updates that include SP1 and post SP1, again, after installing SP2 you'll a set of updates.

    If a product reaches it's end of life, the corresponding updates are not created, in which case, Microsoft recommends using a higher version of the product for safety and stability, like in the case of Windows XP.


    Balaji Kundalam

    • Proposed as answer by Carey FrischMVP Sunday, September 21, 2014 10:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Monday, September 22, 2014 2:09 AM
    Friday, September 19, 2014 4:45 AM
  • Thanks guys!

    This was my understanding of how it worked, but what I have seen is that I perform an initial update, (aside from the update that updates update - say that thee times fast!), is that there are updates that exist on the list along with the SP1 update and that after SP1 is installed, many of them go away and are replaced by others.

    In this particular case, a Hewlett Packard p6-2014 desktop, initial update wanted to install SP1, even though SP1 was already present.  Attempts to update the machine to SP1 returned the dialog "SP1 is already installed", yet it would persist on any future attempt to update.  I ended up by simply "hiding" the SP1 update on this box.

    Thanks again for all your help.

    Jim (JR)

    Sunday, September 21, 2014 9:35 PM

All replies

  • Yes, Service packs contains previously released updates, that helps make Windows more reliable.It includes previously released security, performance, and stability updates that have been rolled out. When you install a SP, the binaries\files gets updated, that's why you get more updates post SP installation. 

    Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    • Proposed as answer by Carey FrischMVP Sunday, September 21, 2014 10:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Monday, September 22, 2014 2:09 AM
    Friday, September 19, 2014 2:30 AM
  • In addition to Arnav Sharma's suggestion, kindly note that there are some updates post SP1 that requires SP1 as prerequisite. Hence, only after installing SP1, such updates can be installed.

    Updates are created frequently to keep the PC secure and stable. Hence, we can't predict a solid point where all the updates are present. For example, if SP2 is released it'll contain all the updates that include SP1 and post SP1, again, after installing SP2 you'll a set of updates.

    If a product reaches it's end of life, the corresponding updates are not created, in which case, Microsoft recommends using a higher version of the product for safety and stability, like in the case of Windows XP.


    Balaji Kundalam

    • Proposed as answer by Carey FrischMVP Sunday, September 21, 2014 10:02 PM
    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Monday, September 22, 2014 2:09 AM
    Friday, September 19, 2014 4:45 AM
  • Thanks guys!

    This was my understanding of how it worked, but what I have seen is that I perform an initial update, (aside from the update that updates update - say that thee times fast!), is that there are updates that exist on the list along with the SP1 update and that after SP1 is installed, many of them go away and are replaced by others.

    In this particular case, a Hewlett Packard p6-2014 desktop, initial update wanted to install SP1, even though SP1 was already present.  Attempts to update the machine to SP1 returned the dialog "SP1 is already installed", yet it would persist on any future attempt to update.  I ended up by simply "hiding" the SP1 update on this box.

    Thanks again for all your help.

    Jim (JR)

    Sunday, September 21, 2014 9:35 PM