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Integrating Lync with old Avaya PBX RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm looking for some opinions on the best way to integrate a Lync install with an old Avaya PBX. Ideally I'd like to setup a media gateway (like Mediant 1000 or something like that) that can take our incoming PSTN trunks (we have two T1's) and route back out through T1's to the old Avaya switch or route out to Lync through ethernet based on some dial plans on the gateway. That way we can slowly migrate individual extensions slowly over to Lync by just change dialing rules on the gateway and on Lync as needed to match the migrations (our Avaya switch doesn't have a dial plan so we'd need to do it through the "dial 9 to get out" method I suppose). 1. Does this make sense as a strategy to take for migrating to Lync? 2. Can a media gateway (like the Mediant 1000 or equivalent) handle two incoming T1 trunks bound together as one? 3. Can a media gateway (like the Mediant 1000 or equivalent) do the sort of routing I mentioned? 4. If yes to all, can something like the Mediant 1000 handle 4 T1 ports as well as ethernet and if we change to SIP trunking later is it flexible enough for that too or is that too much (or a different gateway would be needed)? thanks in advance Steve
    Friday, June 3, 2011 9:25 PM

Answers

  • Steve,

    You're strategy is very feasible, and makes good sense since i would imagine the ultimate goal is to migrate your Avaya users gradually toward Lync. Most certified/qualified gateways should be able to do what you're describing, i.e. grooming off calls to either Avaya or Lync based on where the user's are homed to. The difference lies in the effort required to implement such a scenario.

    Let me just clarify that i do work for NET (in Australia) - one of the 5 gateway partners for Lync -, however hopefully the following information will provide you some additional food for thought that can help you.

    One thing you may want to look at, is AD-aware gateways. This capability will seriously decrease the amount of changes you will need to make on the Gateway, Avaya and Lync since it is AD that "tells" the gateway whether a users lives on the Avaya or on Lync; and based on the results from AD, the gateway will automatically route the inbound call to wherever the user resides. Hopefully you can see from this that the migration of users off the legacy voice environment to Lync, makes sense.

    With AD-aware gateways be sure to understand how AD integration capabilities are implemented. Does the AD Integration piece do an AD lookup on every call that the gateway receives (not preferrable since you would be hitting AD on each call, and for a busy environment this would create unnecessary load on AD)? Or does is the AD capability of the gateway configurable (i.e. decide which way it gathers the information from AD, decide which attributes are relavent in AD and only retrieve those; does the gateway cache the AD information (if not, how does is the routing decision made if the gateway cannot reach AD for whatever reason) ?

    Another great point you make is the ability to also handle SIP Trunking traffic simultaneously. Again the choice in gateways needs to have this consideration top of mind in my humble opinion. Your choice needs to be able to truely supporting the Any to Any architecture (i.e. Any protocol to Any protocol) on the same device; the devil can be in the detail though. When SIP trunking is being considered, and any other transcoding requirements (i.e. to other IP systems running different codecs, such as IP PBXs, DECT systems, mutliple SIP trunking providers, etc), one must look at the capacity of simultaneously transcoded sessions that a gateway device can support. This information will provide you with a clear picture of what can be capable of handling your requirements today (which may be less than what your requirements will be in the near future) and which is capable of supporting your projected requirements also.

    In any case, your approach to deploying Lync is spot on; and hopefully i've been able to provide some information that you will find useful.

    Cheers

    Maurizio

     

     

    • Marked as answer by scarr4 Monday, June 6, 2011 4:42 PM
    Saturday, June 4, 2011 4:16 AM

All replies

  • Hi Steve,

    I think that does make sense as a strategy - it does increase your workload a bit.

    That's exactly what I did when migrating bit by bit from an old Nortel Option 11C to OCS, except I used Asterisk as the gateway with a dual T1 card (one T1 for the PSTN, one for the Nortel).  Asterisk routed calls between the PSTN, the Nortel and OCS.  Four port cards are available.

    I would imagine the Avaya could route certain banks of numbers out to Lync - for example, if all your number are 1XX, then use 2XX for your Lync users, or make all your Lync users 9XX (not 911!) then it takes care of the 9 issue.

    I'd advise giving Lync to your 'technology' heros first in your company.  This way of working can be overwhelming for people who have just used a traditional telephone.  The 'heros' help get the others on board.

    Sorry - I don't know enough about the Mediant 1000 to answer the other questions.

    Regards

    Paul Adams


    pauladamsit.com
    Friday, June 3, 2011 11:54 PM
  • Steve,

    You're strategy is very feasible, and makes good sense since i would imagine the ultimate goal is to migrate your Avaya users gradually toward Lync. Most certified/qualified gateways should be able to do what you're describing, i.e. grooming off calls to either Avaya or Lync based on where the user's are homed to. The difference lies in the effort required to implement such a scenario.

    Let me just clarify that i do work for NET (in Australia) - one of the 5 gateway partners for Lync -, however hopefully the following information will provide you some additional food for thought that can help you.

    One thing you may want to look at, is AD-aware gateways. This capability will seriously decrease the amount of changes you will need to make on the Gateway, Avaya and Lync since it is AD that "tells" the gateway whether a users lives on the Avaya or on Lync; and based on the results from AD, the gateway will automatically route the inbound call to wherever the user resides. Hopefully you can see from this that the migration of users off the legacy voice environment to Lync, makes sense.

    With AD-aware gateways be sure to understand how AD integration capabilities are implemented. Does the AD Integration piece do an AD lookup on every call that the gateway receives (not preferrable since you would be hitting AD on each call, and for a busy environment this would create unnecessary load on AD)? Or does is the AD capability of the gateway configurable (i.e. decide which way it gathers the information from AD, decide which attributes are relavent in AD and only retrieve those; does the gateway cache the AD information (if not, how does is the routing decision made if the gateway cannot reach AD for whatever reason) ?

    Another great point you make is the ability to also handle SIP Trunking traffic simultaneously. Again the choice in gateways needs to have this consideration top of mind in my humble opinion. Your choice needs to be able to truely supporting the Any to Any architecture (i.e. Any protocol to Any protocol) on the same device; the devil can be in the detail though. When SIP trunking is being considered, and any other transcoding requirements (i.e. to other IP systems running different codecs, such as IP PBXs, DECT systems, mutliple SIP trunking providers, etc), one must look at the capacity of simultaneously transcoded sessions that a gateway device can support. This information will provide you with a clear picture of what can be capable of handling your requirements today (which may be less than what your requirements will be in the near future) and which is capable of supporting your projected requirements also.

    In any case, your approach to deploying Lync is spot on; and hopefully i've been able to provide some information that you will find useful.

    Cheers

    Maurizio

     

     

    • Marked as answer by scarr4 Monday, June 6, 2011 4:42 PM
    Saturday, June 4, 2011 4:16 AM
  • Hi scarr4,

    you can use the mediant 1000 in front of the Avaya to route every call to the Lync or the Avaya. The mediant 1000 can connect with LDAP to your Domain and route the call to the PBX or to Lync if the user is Lync enabled. The configuration is a little bit complex, but it works perfect.

    I have use this scenario for several our customers.

     

    The mediant 1000 (MSBG 1000) handle 4 T1 and also SIP trunking and you can later activate a SBC on the Gateway with a license. If you need analog lines it is also possible with this gateway.


    regards Holger Technical Specialist UC
    Saturday, June 4, 2011 8:47 AM
  • wow, thanks for all the great responses. It looks like this is definitely a route that will work based on all the feedback. I didn't know about the AD integration that is possible for routing so that will be an additional thing to look into. And yes Paul, I know this will be a bit of a tedious way to go but I don't think my users will like the instant replacement technique and will need to some hand holding and leadership from the folks that you called "heros", thus the slow migration planning. Again, thanks everyone for the thorough responses
    Monday, June 6, 2011 4:40 PM
  • With the

    The mediant 1000 (MSBG 1000) that handle 4 T1 in front of the Avaya system what is the best way to get DID calls from Avaya to Lync ? We are being asked to remove the avaya station and just point the numbers to Lync for a test group. Our stations are in different ranges example 53XXX, 269XX within the avaya PBX now

    Wednesday, July 4, 2012 3:03 AM