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  • Hello,

    I'm interested in writing wiki for Technet and have a few questions.

    1. When I write MSDN code samples I can save but not publish which is great for starting a code sample and pausing. I did not see this option in the editor, only save. Does the save actually publish?
    2. I would like to write topics in several languages e.g. C# and VB.NET, is is proper to write one for each language or one that encompasses both languages in one wiki?
    3. Which browser (I'm under Windows 7) is best for working on wiki pages in regards to writing wiki as I've seen some web pages indicating some browsers don't play well with TechNet wiki.
    4. Last question, is it possible to provide ready to run Visual Studio solutions in wiki pages or is it okay to point to say Microsoft Onedrive for this or is this not appropriate?

    Thanks for your time,

    Karen


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.
    VB Forums - moderator
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

    Sunday, October 9, 2016 12:54 AM

Answers

    1. Yes, the "Save" in the TechNet Wiki editor publishes the article. Many poeple publish their new article, then edit it several (or many) times before it is complete. If you do that, you can add the tag "work in progess" so that others should leave the article alone until you remove the tag. I personally do most of my work in a text file with htm extension, so the article is very near completion before I first publish. I preview my work in IE. I spend a lot of time on grammar, spelling, research for links (for my "See Also", and "Other Resources" sections), and testing. When I finally first publish, I copy the html into my new Wiki. But I also have years of experience with html. I also add a temporary image at the top of my article from this page: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/250.wiki-message-templates.aspx. I insert the html from that article near the top of my Wiki for the image that states: "This topic is work in progress." Then I try to finalize the article in the next day or so, after which I remove the image and the "work in progess" tag.
    2. This would be a matter of opinion. I think a separate article for each language makes sense. You would add the appropriate tag for the language to each article, and you would add links from one language article to the others in the "See Also".
    3. I use IE 9 on my Windows 7 machine because that version has the fewest problems/issues (I must be careful to never get the IE updates). The OS does not matter. I never use IE 10 or 11, except to update tags (never to edit). Too many issues. Other Wiki regulars use FireFox or Chrome mostly (I believe). I have used FireFox, but I think IE 9 is even better, if that is even possible for you. When someone uses a newer version of IE to update one of my articles I often need to fix the article because something got broken (return to top links, the table of contents, the colors, etc). I know how to fix these issues in the HTML editor, but that takes experience.
    4. Many articles include code. The Wiki editor has a button to insert code blocks. But another idea is to publish the code, perhaps in the TechNet Gallery (or other Microsoft site) and link to that in the Wiki. Then the Wiki can explain parts of the code, the purpose, how to use it, etc. I have only linked to the TechNet Gallery myself. However, a VS solution (involving many files) is a bit different, so a link to it seems appropriate. I believe the permissions on a OneDrive might be a problem, especially in the future. I know images in the Wiki often get broken because they are linked from some other site.

    When I first create my Wiki, I never use an app like Word, which adds lots of html and classes that are not supported in the Wiki platform. When I started I relied on this article for guidance:

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/1775.wiki-user-experience-guidelines.aspx


    Richard Mueller - MVP Enterprise Mobility (Identity and Access)

    Monday, October 10, 2016 12:33 AM
    Moderator

All replies

    1. Yes, the "Save" in the TechNet Wiki editor publishes the article. Many poeple publish their new article, then edit it several (or many) times before it is complete. If you do that, you can add the tag "work in progess" so that others should leave the article alone until you remove the tag. I personally do most of my work in a text file with htm extension, so the article is very near completion before I first publish. I preview my work in IE. I spend a lot of time on grammar, spelling, research for links (for my "See Also", and "Other Resources" sections), and testing. When I finally first publish, I copy the html into my new Wiki. But I also have years of experience with html. I also add a temporary image at the top of my article from this page: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/250.wiki-message-templates.aspx. I insert the html from that article near the top of my Wiki for the image that states: "This topic is work in progress." Then I try to finalize the article in the next day or so, after which I remove the image and the "work in progess" tag.
    2. This would be a matter of opinion. I think a separate article for each language makes sense. You would add the appropriate tag for the language to each article, and you would add links from one language article to the others in the "See Also".
    3. I use IE 9 on my Windows 7 machine because that version has the fewest problems/issues (I must be careful to never get the IE updates). The OS does not matter. I never use IE 10 or 11, except to update tags (never to edit). Too many issues. Other Wiki regulars use FireFox or Chrome mostly (I believe). I have used FireFox, but I think IE 9 is even better, if that is even possible for you. When someone uses a newer version of IE to update one of my articles I often need to fix the article because something got broken (return to top links, the table of contents, the colors, etc). I know how to fix these issues in the HTML editor, but that takes experience.
    4. Many articles include code. The Wiki editor has a button to insert code blocks. But another idea is to publish the code, perhaps in the TechNet Gallery (or other Microsoft site) and link to that in the Wiki. Then the Wiki can explain parts of the code, the purpose, how to use it, etc. I have only linked to the TechNet Gallery myself. However, a VS solution (involving many files) is a bit different, so a link to it seems appropriate. I believe the permissions on a OneDrive might be a problem, especially in the future. I know images in the Wiki often get broken because they are linked from some other site.

    When I first create my Wiki, I never use an app like Word, which adds lots of html and classes that are not supported in the Wiki platform. When I started I relied on this article for guidance:

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/1775.wiki-user-experience-guidelines.aspx


    Richard Mueller - MVP Enterprise Mobility (Identity and Access)

    Monday, October 10, 2016 12:33 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks fir the detailed reply, just what I needed to begin.

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.
    VB Forums - moderator
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

    Monday, October 10, 2016 9:10 AM