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pausing a project due to client not providing info RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear all,<o:p></o:p>

    I hope that you are well.<o:p></o:p>

    I would kindly like your advice and what the best practises are when it is required to
    pause a project.<o:p></o:p>

    Let me explain the scenario:<o:p></o:p>

    I have a task deliverable set for 8 work hours. The task is dependent on the client for
    example providing us with images to complete the entire 8 hour task
    deliverable.<o:p></o:p>

    Now we have completed 2 hours of actual work on the task but the other 6 hours are dependent
    on these images. The client still has not provided us with the images to be
    able to complete the task. It has been two days since and therefore in theory
    my project end date moves on by 2 days. <o:p></o:p>

    How does one update this in Project 2013? What are the best practises? And does anyone
    have a tutorial / website where I can read up on this?<o:p></o:p>

    Thanks in advance.<o:p></o:p>

    geo<o:p></o:p>


    Thursday, January 17, 2013 7:02 AM

Answers

  • You can do it several ways.  The best would be to open the project in project professional, apply 2 hours to the task as actual work and it should calculate the remaining to 6 hours.

    Of if you use timesheets, just apply 2 hours to the task, submit and approve.

    Your question is to broad for the forums.  I would suggest reading the MSProjectExpert book about using Project Server.

    Cheers


    Michael Wharton, MVP, MBA, PMP, MCT, MCTS, MCSD, MCSE+I, MCDBA
    Website http://www.WhartonComputer.com
    Blog http://MyProjectExpert.com contains my field notes and SQL queries

    Thursday, January 17, 2013 3:00 PM
    Moderator
  • To add a little to Michael's suggestion, you could split the task. The 2 hours of actual work would be shown as completed on the day for which the actual hours were entered. The remaining 6 hours would be shown at a later date - with the split task dotted line showing the split in the Project Professional Gantt Chart. In Project Pro 2010, use the Project:Status tab, Update Project and specify reschedule uncompleted work on the particular task to start after the expected date.

    An alternative would be to split the work into two tasks - one for the first 2 hours, the other for the work that depends on the additional input.

    Graham

    Saturday, January 19, 2013 4:06 AM

All replies

  • You can do it several ways.  The best would be to open the project in project professional, apply 2 hours to the task as actual work and it should calculate the remaining to 6 hours.

    Of if you use timesheets, just apply 2 hours to the task, submit and approve.

    Your question is to broad for the forums.  I would suggest reading the MSProjectExpert book about using Project Server.

    Cheers


    Michael Wharton, MVP, MBA, PMP, MCT, MCTS, MCSD, MCSE+I, MCDBA
    Website http://www.WhartonComputer.com
    Blog http://MyProjectExpert.com contains my field notes and SQL queries

    Thursday, January 17, 2013 3:00 PM
    Moderator
  • To add a little to Michael's suggestion, you could split the task. The 2 hours of actual work would be shown as completed on the day for which the actual hours were entered. The remaining 6 hours would be shown at a later date - with the split task dotted line showing the split in the Project Professional Gantt Chart. In Project Pro 2010, use the Project:Status tab, Update Project and specify reschedule uncompleted work on the particular task to start after the expected date.

    An alternative would be to split the work into two tasks - one for the first 2 hours, the other for the work that depends on the additional input.

    Graham

    Saturday, January 19, 2013 4:06 AM
  • As this is not specific to the online world I am moving to the more relevant forum.

    Best regards,

    Brian


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    Sunday, January 20, 2013 12:28 AM
    Owner
  • To answer this question I need to make an assumption about the duration. I assume that you mean by "8 work hours" that one person works on it for 8 hours, so the task has a duration of 8 hours.
    I could as easily make the duration 4 hours if I assume that that you have 2 persons working on it at 100%.

    It is important to distinguish between duration and work which (appear) to have the same units, "hours", but they are not that same thing.
    It would be easier to make the distinction if we could say that duration is measured in hours and work is measured in "man-hours" but that would be gender bias, and "person-hours" sounds awful, so work is measured in hours.

    Lateness is about duration, not work. Sure, the work gets done during that duration, but it is the duration which makes your project late.

    Split your task into 2 tasks, 2 hours and 6 hours duration, and obviously stage 1 is FS0 predecessor of stage 2.

    Make a task task called "hand over pictures" or "wait for client to hand over pictures" (better, because this is what you do).

    Since you don't/can't start waiting until you have done the first of your two tasks then this waiting task is the FS0 successor of your first, and FS0 predecessor of your second.

    See the tracking table. Set the status date, ie the "as of" date, probably now, in project information. Your first task is finished, so it must have an actual start and actual finish. The waiting task must have an actual start and some actual duration, 16 hours. It must also have some remaining duration which is an estimate of the duration from the status date to whenever you think it might finish. You may not have any idea how long that will be but you still must estimate it. Your project is already 16 hours late but you can expect it to be 24 hours late if you think that the client will hand over the pictures tomorrow

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 7:42 AM