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Windows Server CALs plus SharePoint Standard CALs plus SharePoint Enterprise CALs RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm building a business intelligence server.  I want to put SharePoint Server 2013 and SQL Server 2014 Enterprise Edition on it, on top of Windows Server 2014 R2.  Obviously, I'm going to need a bunch of SharePoint 2013 Enterprise Client Access Licenses as well.  SQL Server is going to be licensed on the per-core model.

    My question is regarding any other required CALs.  Here's my understanding of the configuration:

    I've been contending that there is norequirement for additional Client Access Licenses other than the SharePoint 2013 Enterprise CALs mentioned above.  However . . .

    I've received advice that there is a requirement for (for each employee who accesses the solution) for a Windows Server 2012 R2 CAL plus a SharePoint 2013 Standard CAL plus a SharePoint 2013 Enterprise CAL.  

    My thinking regarding Windows Server: “Client Access Licenses (CALs) are required for each user or device accessed.  The Windows Server 2012 related CALs provide entitlement to access and use Windows Server 2012 R2 functionality” {Windows Server 2012 R2 Licensing Guide].  In our case, no devices or users are directly accessing WS2012 R2.  The OS is being used solely to run the application software, SQL Server 2014 and SharePoint 2013.  Thus, there are no operating system CALs required for this configuration.  (There are a number of functions — such as file storage, print sharing, etc. — which if used, would require server CALs, but we’re not using any of them.)


    I'm aware that the SP CALs are additive for the Volume Licensing programme (and thus both a standard CAL and and Enterprise CAL would be required for each user).   However, there is no volume or enterprise agreement in place - this is a stand-alone build.  Would the Enterprise CAL suite be the best choice here?

    Your thoughts, please?  Windows CALs required . . . or not?

     

    Donna Kelly

    Wednesday, December 2, 2015 1:07 PM

Answers

  • You can't use Windows 10 as part of a SharePoint farm.

    However you only need one Windows Server CAL per user. That's true if you use one Windows server or if you have hundreds in use. There is a cost for the OS as well so for 20 servers and 100 users you would buy 20 OS licenses and 100 CALS, for 5 servers and 200 users you would buy five OSs and 200 CALs.

    It's worth mentioning that SharePoint 2013 allows you to give users either Enterprise or Standard licenses, so they are blocked from using BI tools or anything they aren't licensed for.

    Friday, December 4, 2015 12:47 PM

All replies

  • It appears so, dated information but I don't know of any changes since this was published:

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/6/8/9/68964284-864d-4a6d-aed9-f2c1f8f23e14/Assessing_SharePoint_Server_Licensing.pdf

    "Because SharePoint can only be installed on the Windows Server® operating system, you must purchase the appropriate Windows Server licenses. Windows Server is licensed separately from SharePoint Server, typically through the server-plus-CAL model. Users who access SharePoint need a Windows Server CAL, except when:

    ■ A user anonymously accesses SharePoint from the Internet. SharePoint Server Licensing Requirements 4

    ■ Windows Server access is licensed with a Windows Server External Connector, which is available only for external users for use off-site. (Internal users must have CALs.)

    SharePoint Foundation Server 2010 (previously known as Windows® SharePoint Services) is a free addon to Windows Server that supplies basic SharePoint functionality. To use it as a free standalone product, you do not need SharePoint server licenses or CALs. However, when Windows Server is the foundation for SharePoint Foundation, SharePoint Server and SharePoint FIS, you will need Windows Server licenses and CALs, as outlined above. "

    Wednesday, December 2, 2015 2:27 PM
  • Alex,

    thanks for this.  It would seem then, that every time I put a new server in, I need to buy a set of Windows CALS. 

    What if I bought 8 Windows boxes to act as load-balanced front-end processors for some SharePoint components of my SharePoint intranet farm?  It would seem that I need 8 CALS for each user.  No? 

    FYI, I must use SharePoint Server 2013 with Enterprise CALs, because this is all about using business intelligence features like PowerView, PerformancePoint Services for SharePoint, and so on.

    Cheers, Donna


    Donna Kelly


    • Edited by Lady Donna Friday, December 4, 2015 12:35 PM
    Friday, December 4, 2015 12:32 PM
  • You can't use Windows 10 as part of a SharePoint farm.

    However you only need one Windows Server CAL per user. That's true if you use one Windows server or if you have hundreds in use. There is a cost for the OS as well so for 20 servers and 100 users you would buy 20 OS licenses and 100 CALS, for 5 servers and 200 users you would buy five OSs and 200 CALs.

    It's worth mentioning that SharePoint 2013 allows you to give users either Enterprise or Standard licenses, so they are blocked from using BI tools or anything they aren't licensed for.

    Friday, December 4, 2015 12:47 PM