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BSOD in boot with disk protection on (sptd.sys) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I recently installed SteadyState (2.5) on my hp NC8430 laptop with an SSD.

    When booting/restarting the computer, I get a screen saying "Windows Disk Protection is committing changes, please wait..."  the harddrive LED stays on solid for several minutes, then I receive a BSOD for:
    -DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
    Stop 0x000000d1 (0x00000050, 0x00000005, 0x00000001, 0xB9ED1B32)

    the bracketed numbers change every time I attempt to start
    a subsequent time, it was (0x00000001, 0x00000005, 0x00000001, 0xB9ED1ABA)

    sptd.sys Address B9Ed1B32 ---> was B9ED1ABA a subsequent time

    Base at B9ED0000 datestamp 453f71e0

    Powering the system off and back on yields a normal startup without the "Windows Disk Protection is committing changes, please wait..." message.  Once windows is started, a reboot yields the same BSOD described above.

    In troubleshooting, I have found that sptd.sys is a part of Alcohol 152% (CD imaging software).  I have uninstalled this program, and renamed sptd.sys to OLDsptd.sys.

    Now, after receiving the
    "Windows Disk Protection is committing changes, please wait..." screen, the computer just restarts automatically (back to the POST screen) and boots normally, again without the "WDP is committing changes" message.

    Could anyone offer insight on further troubleshooting steps I should take?

    Thanks,

    Jeff

    Wednesday, November 26, 2008 6:57 PM

Answers

  • Hi Jeff,

     

     Jeff Siow wrote:

    In troubleshooting, I have founded that sptd.sys is a part of Alcohol 152% (CD imaging software).  I have uninstalled this program, and renamed sptd.sys to OLDsptd.sys.

     

    It sounds like that driver has a bug that's exposed when Windows Disk Protection is active. 

     

     Jeff Siow wrote:

    Now, after receiving the "Windows Disk Protection is committing changes, please wait..." screen, the computer just restarts automatically (back to the POST screen) and boots normally, again without the "WDP is committing changes" message.

     

    That sounds like normal operation.  The system is rebooted automatically immediately after committing cached data to disk in order to ensure that the registry is in a consistent state, and to allow the system to boot up with any changes that may have been made to the boot files.  So, you should see boot; commit message; reboot; boot; regular Windows logon.

     

    Thanks,

    Rob Elmer

    Development Lead

    Windows SteadyState

    Saturday, November 29, 2008 4:33 AM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Jeff, thanks for posting here! The BSOD issue with sptd.sys should be related to virtual drive application such as Alcohol or Daemon Tools. As you have narrowed down and found the root cause of the BSOD issue, we should focus on Windows SteadyState and Windows Disk Protection issue, right? For the current issue, I suggest you temporarily disable WDP, restart the computer and enable WDP again to check the result. You can also try the steps in the following thread:

     

    computer hangs on WDP is committing changes

    http://forums.microsoft.com/TechNet/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=4167227&SiteID=69

     

    Hope this helps!

    Friday, November 28, 2008 6:30 AM
  • Hi Jeff,

     

     Jeff Siow wrote:

    In troubleshooting, I have founded that sptd.sys is a part of Alcohol 152% (CD imaging software).  I have uninstalled this program, and renamed sptd.sys to OLDsptd.sys.

     

    It sounds like that driver has a bug that's exposed when Windows Disk Protection is active. 

     

     Jeff Siow wrote:

    Now, after receiving the "Windows Disk Protection is committing changes, please wait..." screen, the computer just restarts automatically (back to the POST screen) and boots normally, again without the "WDP is committing changes" message.

     

    That sounds like normal operation.  The system is rebooted automatically immediately after committing cached data to disk in order to ensure that the registry is in a consistent state, and to allow the system to boot up with any changes that may have been made to the boot files.  So, you should see boot; commit message; reboot; boot; regular Windows logon.

     

    Thanks,

    Rob Elmer

    Development Lead

    Windows SteadyState

    Saturday, November 29, 2008 4:33 AM
  • Thanks for your response.

    I guess I'll have to figure out a workaround virtual imaging software to avoid the sptd.sys bug.


    Jeff
    Sunday, November 30, 2008 1:12 AM