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Maximum recommended size for a mailbox in 2010? 2TB is limit but what is recommened max? RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have an exec which has asked for ALL his email to be pulled out of the email archive tool and into his mailbox.  When I say exec, I mean the guy that runs the company level!  My team lead has requsted the job be action and half way through the restore his mailbox is already up to 17GB.  He has 160,000+ items in the mailbox (filtered away in folders by date and month so not all in his inbox).

    Outlook 2010 is running against Exchange 2010 in ONLINE mode due to Citrix being in use here.  Can people advise what sort of problems to look out for with mailboxes this size, or is Exchange 2010 OK for indexing mailboxes of that size GB and item wise?

    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 9:24 PM

Answers

  • The real issues with mailbox size of which I am aware are (1) the number of items in a folder, (2) the number of folders, and (3) cached mode. 

    (1) If there are a lot of items in a folder, say more than 1,000 to 5,000, then it can take a long time for Outlook (in cached mode) or Exchange (in online mode) to render the view when the user clicks on the folder.  So it's especially ugly when there are a lot of items in the Inbox. 

    (2) If there are a lot of folders, you're going to be overwhelmed by warnings in the event log. 

    (3) It's a daunting thought that a user would be synchronizing 25GB or more of offline folders between the server and his Outlook client.  Think of how long that would take if he had to create a new OST for some reason.


    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    • Marked as answer by Douggly Wednesday, August 29, 2012 2:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 11:46 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The real issues with mailbox size of which I am aware are (1) the number of items in a folder, (2) the number of folders, and (3) cached mode. 

    (1) If there are a lot of items in a folder, say more than 1,000 to 5,000, then it can take a long time for Outlook (in cached mode) or Exchange (in online mode) to render the view when the user clicks on the folder.  So it's especially ugly when there are a lot of items in the Inbox. 

    (2) If there are a lot of folders, you're going to be overwhelmed by warnings in the event log. 

    (3) It's a daunting thought that a user would be synchronizing 25GB or more of offline folders between the server and his Outlook client.  Think of how long that would take if he had to create a new OST for some reason.


    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    • Marked as answer by Douggly Wednesday, August 29, 2012 2:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 28, 2012 11:46 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Ed. We won't be using offline sync as Outlook runs in online mode due to Citrix so thankfully a 30GB mailbox won't need to sync!!

    One thing is that his folders are neatly away from his inbox and the general default Outlook folders are all clean meaning no more than 5000 items in a folder. He has a folder for every year since 2002 with a month for each year within each.

    Unless somoene else chimes in saying "You're screwed!" I suppose I will just have to let it grow and see what happens!

    Wednesday, August 29, 2012 2:30 AM
  • This is a perfect use of the online archive mailbox feature of Exchange 2010.

    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."

    Wednesday, August 29, 2012 3:09 PM
    Moderator
  • Ed,  I have 1 user (CEO) with about a 30gig mailbox, and his assistant with a 20gig mailbox. The assistant must open both mailboxes (not cached)  to search for things but more often than not it is slow.

    How can I find what is slowing it up, Server, NAS, Network, PC.......

    Or anything in general to do to speed it up?

    thanks..

    Scott

     
    Monday, October 28, 2013 2:32 PM
  • Yeah, reduce the number of items in any one folder.  Reduce the overall size of the mailbox.  Add memory to the server.  Add memory to the workstations.  Replace the hard drive on the workstation and/or server with an solid state drive.  There area all sorts of things you can do.

    Ed Crowley MVP "There are seldom good technological solutions to behavioral problems."


    Thursday, October 31, 2013 6:17 AM
    Moderator