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Windows 7 - Spontaneous shutdown and failure to restart RRS feed

  • Question

  • The computer in question is a HP pavillion that was purchased new in Jan. 2012 and runs Windows 7. It is used in my office to run mainly simple design projects on CorelDraw and similiar programs. Today when I arrived at work I discovered that the computer had been left on overnight (Ok, No biggie) so I unhibernated it and proceeded to check our work email on Yahoo, directly after loading the page, my screen went black and was unresponsive for a few seconds and then proceeded to shut down (regular screen images, etc.). I thought it was strange but allowed the computer to shut down and afterwards pressed the power button on the tower to turn the computer back on. The tower immediately turned back on, but the screen while turned on, only displayed a small cursor in the top right corner of the screen (similiar to whats displayed right before startup with a few blinks before running script and moving forward) but instead of progressing it stayed blinking there for a few minutes, I tried Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Del and asked it to boot, continue with boot, restart and every option given to me but everything would revert back to this screen, its been blinking now for about 30 minutes unfazed, so I'm seeking help from our other work computer, ANY suggestions???

    Friday, June 7, 2013 7:20 PM

Answers

  • Your system has crashed.  Possibly the hard drive is dead.  You need to have it looked at by a computer repair technician so your hardware problem can be diagnosed.

    This is not a performance issue.  Your computer is not performing at the moment.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    • Marked as answer by E.Lynch Tuesday, June 18, 2013 8:31 PM
    Saturday, June 8, 2013 6:30 PM
  • Hi,


    I suggest you can use an installation disk to repair the system.


    For detail steps:


    1. Insert the Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive, or a system repair disc, and then shut down your computer.

    2. Restart your computer using the computer's power button.

    3. When prompted, press any key, and then follow the instructions that appear.

    4. On the Install Windows page, or on the System Recovery Options page, choose your language and other preferences, and then click Next.


        If neither the Install Windows page nor the System Recovery Options page appear, and you're not asked to press any key, you might need to change some system settings. To learn how to do this, see Start your computer from a Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive.


    5. If you are using the Windows installation disc or USB flash drive, click Repair your computer.

    6. Select the Windows installation you want to repair, and then click Next. (Note: Be sure to make note of the Location drive letter as it probably will not be C: and the correct drive letter must be entered in the following steps; then click Next.)

    7. On the System Recovery Options menu, click Startup Repair or System Restore to test the issue.


    More reference,


    What are the system recovery options in Windows 7?


    Hope this helps.


    Vincent Wang
    TechNet Community Support

    Tuesday, June 11, 2013 5:36 AM

All replies

  • Your system has crashed.  Possibly the hard drive is dead.  You need to have it looked at by a computer repair technician so your hardware problem can be diagnosed.

    This is not a performance issue.  Your computer is not performing at the moment.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    • Marked as answer by E.Lynch Tuesday, June 18, 2013 8:31 PM
    Saturday, June 8, 2013 6:30 PM
  • Hi E.

    Did you try a Windows Installationdisk? You can use it for cmdprompt and repairs as well and does not need to be the one with your licence-key, as long as it is the same version of Windows.

    Furthermore you could try bootdisks like Kaspersky Resquedisk, Reatogo MiniXP or Hirens Boot CD. With these you can examine your computer for other failures besides malware. Kaspersky (in Linux so Nothing in Windows is activated) does not have much tools but can be run in cmd-mode or in windowed mode and has AVscan, browser, an equivalent to Windows Explorer where everything on your comp can be viewed and edited, and Screenshots. Reatogo has a lot of tools and Hirens Bootcd is a multitude of tools. As i recall, but i'm not sure of that, a Dr. Web bootdisk also has several recovery-tools.

    If you're not comfortable using these powerfull tools please mind Rick Dee's answer. If either one of us gave you an acceptable answer, please mark your post as answered.

    http://www.kaspersky.com/virus-scanner ;

    [edit] removed Reatogo-adress, my browser is being redirected [endEdit]

    http://www.hiren.info/pages/bootcd, & http://www.hirensbootcd.org/ ;




    • Edited by Ad Mirgency Saturday, June 8, 2013 10:48 PM
    Saturday, June 8, 2013 8:11 PM
  • Hi,


    I suggest you can use an installation disk to repair the system.


    For detail steps:


    1. Insert the Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive, or a system repair disc, and then shut down your computer.

    2. Restart your computer using the computer's power button.

    3. When prompted, press any key, and then follow the instructions that appear.

    4. On the Install Windows page, or on the System Recovery Options page, choose your language and other preferences, and then click Next.


        If neither the Install Windows page nor the System Recovery Options page appear, and you're not asked to press any key, you might need to change some system settings. To learn how to do this, see Start your computer from a Windows 7 installation disc or USB flash drive.


    5. If you are using the Windows installation disc or USB flash drive, click Repair your computer.

    6. Select the Windows installation you want to repair, and then click Next. (Note: Be sure to make note of the Location drive letter as it probably will not be C: and the correct drive letter must be entered in the following steps; then click Next.)

    7. On the System Recovery Options menu, click Startup Repair or System Restore to test the issue.


    More reference,


    What are the system recovery options in Windows 7?


    Hope this helps.


    Vincent Wang
    TechNet Community Support

    Tuesday, June 11, 2013 5:36 AM