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IE9 Favoites bar on the right??? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am disappointed that the favorites menu drops down on the far right? What fool could possibly anchor the reading pattern of left-to-right in english and similar languages, on the right side of the interface? Obviously, someone who is not fluent in English and similar anchoring languages. Why not move all the menus to the other side, too? Who thought this would be better and what research supports this poor choice of a right-anchor for the eye? Yes, you can PIN the menu on the left, but then you lose screen space while using the interface. If you close the menu, it is back on the right again, and you have to RE-PIN it. There should be a way to move the favorites icon to the left --- so that people who anchor and read in ENGLISH and similar languages will be able to see the content better. It apears that the designers of IE9 are just trying to change things to justify employment. Give us the option of moving the favorites menu to the correct anchoring side of the screen, or hire programmers who read the English language, if possible.

    I may just go back to iE8 now

    Friday, May 6, 2011 12:22 AM

Answers

  • Hi TMucci,

    Sorry for delay.

    I really understand how frustrating this is for you, as the new change for IE9 may make you don't feel habit. But please understand, before every Microsoft products are  produced, this is not a simple process. Microsoft would consider all the information which the customer feedback for the previous versions and decide the final version.

     

    The feedback information from customer is very important for Microsoft, you have opinions regarding Microsoft product , please do not hesitate to  let us know. Customer’s requests always be Microsoft first priority.

     

    Though I cannot make any changes to product  in the forum, what we can do for you is report the information to our feedback team. Then our  feedback team provide for the PG team.

     

    Please rest assured that we will do our best to help you. Also, your understanding and cooperation is appreciated.

     

    Thanks for understanding


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    • Marked as answer by TMucci Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11:52 AM
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011 5:23 AM
  • I find this issue very interesting.  I have become accustomed to favorites on the right in IE9 and find it awkward to use another browser not so configured.  I know where it is...I use it...and it goes away.  The option of moving it would be nice for some, but even if I could, I wouldn't.  English is my native language too.
    • Marked as answer by TMucci Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11:52 AM
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011 9:26 PM

All replies

  • I find this higly annoying too. It's been alright on the left side for years and now all of a sudden someone decided it would be better on the right side of the screen? I've been looking for a way to pin this on the left side permanently but I'm having the same problem, it doesn't look possible. Who the hell designed this? Didn't they figure out that people would probably try to place it back as it was before?

    I'm not the type of person that is always opposed to all changes but someone dropped the ball on this.

    Sunday, May 8, 2011 6:26 AM
  • Hi,

     

    This is by the design. According to your opinion, I will report this issue as customer feedback to our product team.

     

    As a workaround, you can use ALT+A to access Favorites bar.

     

    If you want to submit by yourself or have any suggestions, please submit your feedback to our Product Feedback Team: http://mymfe.microsoft.com/Windows%20%207/Feedback.aspx?formID=195  

     

    Thank you for your understanding and cooperation.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    • Marked as answer by TMucci Thursday, May 12, 2011 2:16 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by TMucci Thursday, May 12, 2011 2:16 AM
    Thursday, May 12, 2011 1:38 AM
  • zhen,

    Your phrase "this is by design" unfortunatley does not advance the conversation, not explain the issue. Of course it is by design. How else could it occur? By mistake? By chance? Please offer more of an explanation beyond the obvious.

    Secondly, my "opinion" is evidence based. Read the literature on language norms, eye movement and anchoring. I also discuss this concept in the 4 books that I have published on Microsoft PowerPoint (Special Edition series).

    The design of the favorites bar is just poor, not thought-out, and not based on evidence of language norms. I suspect those whose languages anchor on the right have no problem with this change. But for those of us who read english or english like languages, the anchoring of the favorites bar should be on the LEFT. Only a designer who is looking to be different, or just doesn't undertand the language, would make this change and call it "by design".

    Feedback to Microsoft is challenging to say the least and generally, Microsoft has been known since the early 1980's to defend irregular or design issues rather than take the higher road and recognoze functionality. A good example is SP2 which carries a known bug in Office 2007 where the charting feature causes PowerPoint to crash. This has been a problem for two years now.

    In the long run, this is not a big deal, as I uninstalled IE9, and will likely choose another browser before upgrading past IE8 if this is not fixed. Howvever, I appreciate your reply and while you may forward my response, be aware that nothing will change with Microsoft.

    This is by design.

    Thursday, May 12, 2011 2:53 AM
  • Hi TMucci,

    Sorry for delay.

    I really understand how frustrating this is for you, as the new change for IE9 may make you don't feel habit. But please understand, before every Microsoft products are  produced, this is not a simple process. Microsoft would consider all the information which the customer feedback for the previous versions and decide the final version.

     

    The feedback information from customer is very important for Microsoft, you have opinions regarding Microsoft product , please do not hesitate to  let us know. Customer’s requests always be Microsoft first priority.

     

    Though I cannot make any changes to product  in the forum, what we can do for you is report the information to our feedback team. Then our  feedback team provide for the PG team.

     

    Please rest assured that we will do our best to help you. Also, your understanding and cooperation is appreciated.

     

    Thanks for understanding


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”
    • Marked as answer by TMucci Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11:52 AM
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011 5:23 AM
  • I find this issue very interesting.  I have become accustomed to favorites on the right in IE9 and find it awkward to use another browser not so configured.  I know where it is...I use it...and it goes away.  The option of moving it would be nice for some, but even if I could, I wouldn't.  English is my native language too.
    • Marked as answer by TMucci Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11:52 AM
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011 9:26 PM
  • Yes, you have clearly described the user experience of "growing accustomed" to a change. Of course, we must all adapt to these things. If all menu bars were suddenly right justified, and reversed, we would eventually get used to it as well. But the user experience should be not be compromised for the sake of design. The change in IE9 did not solve an exisiting problem, it created one. You correctly identified the comparitive problem by mentioning how other browsers now look awkward to you. Yet, prior to IE9, this configuration was not an issue for you. The point that you made shows that the change is noticed, and because the design move is not based on reading anchors, the Microsoft team made a poor choice for no functional purpose.

    Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11:52 AM
  • I just spent a good hour trying to figure out how to get my favorites back to the left. It was a terrible idea to not give users the option to have the favorites bar on the left.  I hope this gets fixed in the next IE.
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 1:37 AM
  • Yes... one can only "hope". I agree that it would be nice if the option existed, but software developers rarely admit a design error and tend to become defensive. The Microsoft team will likely justify the design by leaving it as is... which is why I will stay with IE8 and won't go to IE9. I have a number of other colleagues who are doing the same thing.
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 11:40 AM
  • I will not upgrade until the favorites button can be moved to the left. I am 52 years old. I have used IE from the first release. Yes, I will change a light bulb if it is broken, but I will not change my preferance for where the favorite button is located.
    Sunday, June 5, 2011 12:44 AM
  • Kudos to you! As an original IE user myself,  I can relate to your light bulb analogy.

    If you notice, Zhen Tan's comment in an earlier thread "Microsoft would consider all the information which the customer feedback for the previous versions and decide the final version." implies that CUSTOMER FEEDBACK actually prompted this "fix" to change the favorites bar, and only then did that result in the final version. Who are these customers? Certainly not representatives of our language anchor norms (left-to-right).

    Of course, Zhen appears to not have english as a native language (as surmised by his grammatical choices) and I suspect that his native laguage anchors on the right, or even vertically, which is why the cusomers Zhen refers to are likely in his locality and not in a native english-speaking country, or similar language area with left-to-right reading norms. This group would prompt such feedback.

    This is a simple case of a Microsoft design team, who made an unsupported cosmetic change to a light bulb that was still working. The team leader cannot justify the change, nor offer a response in this forum. To avoid embarrassment, nothing in the new product can change, so eventually this whole point will be moot. But at least we can vent.

    Sunday, June 5, 2011 1:44 PM
  • I completely agree!  It is utterly stupid to have such an important and common menu (Favorites) way on the right side.  Most of us have wide screens and it is very annoying to have to go all the way to the right to get your favorites.  Options menu is OK there but not favorites.  I don't care if chrome has done that, which is I guess why MS decided to blindly follow Chrome.

     

    Also, there is no progress bar or even a wait icon on the cursor.  On framed sites half the time I don't know if my connection is lost or the site is just processing.  Com'on MS let's get the obvious stuff right.

    Back to IE8 until this stuff is fixed.  It kills funtionality.

    Tuesday, June 21, 2011 4:48 PM
  • Seriously, anyone who supports the favorites menu on the far right is completely clueless when it comes to HCI and interface design. Don't just talk, show me the study and the data that shows that the menu on the right is better than the left. Surely Microsoft, with it's unlimited resources, did a usability study right? They wouldn't just change something just for the hell of it would they? That would go against the basics of Computer Science and Software Engineering and would make me lose a lot of respect for you guys.
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 4:27 PM
  • Who thought this would be better and what research supports this poor choice of a right-anchor for the eye? Yes, you can PIN the menu on the left, but then you lose screen space while using the interface. If you close the menu, it is back on the right again, and you have to RE-PIN it.


    Dude, this is Microsoft. They don't care much about usability. They just do whatever they think is good without any customer input. There's no way they would have done something as the bookmarks on the right if they would've heard to the users. Plus, without going any further, look at the Windows 8 developer preview. The thing is a monument to poor choices and design in user interaction with the OS. Sure the Metro UI looks pretty, and is fine if you have a tablet, but if you need to do any serious PC work, forget about it.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:55 AM
  • This is why I have not upgraded to the new version.... but eventually if I wish to continue using explorer, the menu issue will never be fixed and each successive version will operate as inefficiently. You are correct that Microsoft is not asking users for input, or else this would not be a point discussion. 
    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:40 PM
  • Yes, you are correct and you would think Microsoft would conduct such studies --- and if they did --- they would share the results. Highly unlikely. The reason they cannot possibly show results is that the outcomes would show they have a design flaw and Microsoft is notorious for not admitting any mistakes. So, were are all simply vetting a frustration that no Microsoft manager wishes to address.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:44 PM