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possible DNS or DHCP issue RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've had issues similar to this once in a while, but not quite like this. When I try to ping a hostname, I get an IP address for that machine, but the trouble is, that IP address actually belongs to another machine. For example: If I had two machines, one named win2000 and the other win7pro; I ping win2000 and it returns an IP of 172.16.145.1. When I ping win7pro, it also returns the IP of 172.16.145.1. When I use remote desktop or VNC to connect to win2000 using the hostname, I get logged in, only to find that the machine I have logged into is actually win7pro and not win2000. If I check DHCP I find the address for win200 is actually 172.16.145.10 and the machine shows the correct IP also when I login with RDP or VNC. I tried checking my DNS server entries and DHCP. DHCP reports the correct hostname associated with the correct IP address, but DNS sometimes will not even have a DNS entry for the hostname. I have two DNS servers running server 2k8 standard. Both have active directory. My primary DC also runs DHCP. For some reason, it seems that DNS is not properly pointing the IP addresses to the correct machine. Is there any way to reset the DNS on my workstation other than ipconfig /flushdns to make sure it's all cleared out and clean? Or does my machine always check my DNS servers for the appropriate entries every time you use the DNS name? Thanks.

     

    Addendum: I've also found that my forward lookup zone sometimes contains multiple hostnames for an IP address. I had set the scavange and aging records to 7 days. Why does DNS keep entries for IP addresses that are no longer valid according to DHCP?

    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 5:03 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Does this network actually have an SBS box? If not you might try asking this question in a more general Windows Server forum.

    Steve

    <shearbass> wrote in message news:784df1f8-8122-4c65-ab11-264b0e09ac07@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    I've had issues similar to this once in a while, but not quite like this. When I try to ping a hostname, I get an IP address for that machine, but the trouble is, that IP address actually belongs to another machine. For example: If I had two machines, one named win2000 and the other win7pro; I ping win2000 and it returns an IP of 172.16.145.1. When I ping win7pro, it also returns the IP of 172.16.145.1. When I use remote desktop or VNC to connect to win2000 using the hostname, I get logged in, only to find that the machine I have logged into is actually win7pro and not win2000. If I check DHCP I find the address for win200 is actually 172.16.145.10 and the machine shows the correct IP also when I login with RDP or VNC. I tried checking my DNS server entries and DHCP. DHCP reports the correct hostname associated with the correct IP address, but DNS sometimes will not even have a DNS entry for the hostname. I have two DNS servers running server 2k8 standard. Both have active directory. My primary DC also runs DHCP. For some reason, it seems that DNS is not properly pointing the IP addresses to the correct machine. Is there any way to reset the DNS on my workstation other than ipconfig /flushdns to make sure it's all cleared out and clean? Or does my machine always check my DNS servers for the appropriate entries every time you use the DNS name? Thanks.



    Addendum: I've also found that my forward lookup zone sometimes contains multiple hostnames for an IP address. I had set the scavange and aging records to 7 days. Why does DNS keep entries for IP addresses that are no longer valid according to DHCP?

    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 5:30 PM
  • oh yeah I didnt even notice where I was.. I'll move my post.
    Wednesday, January 5, 2011 5:36 PM
  • For Windows Server issues, you can post to the following forum:

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/category/windowsserver 

    Thank you.


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    Monday, January 10, 2011 5:59 AM
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