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new sql server 64 bit - cpu/ memory requirements? RRS feed

  • Question

  • we are about to upgrade to a new 64-bit sql and a new iis server for our asp/sql site. How can I calculate how much ram and cpu power would be suitable for my installation? I remember coming across a formula for calculating memory by the amount of users on the system. I can't seem to find this... please help?

    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 10:07 PM

Answers

  • Determine how many concurrent user sessions you are anticipating and how big the database files are.  If your database is very small, there is no reason to beef up your server.  I have seen countless SQL servers with databases under 1 GB with 4 GBs of RAM on the server.  It's just not required.  I'm not saying that there won't be a performance improvement, but it's not likely to be worth the cost.  Try configuring your server at a reasonable amount of resources, and use Performance Monitor to measure your Disk, CPU, and Memory utilization, along with SQL and IIS specific counters.  It's likely you won't need much to run a lightweight database.  Folks often throw even 4 GB of RAM for something that just doesn't need it.  Test, Monitor, Adjust, Monitor, and continue as needed until you find your appropriate values.
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Sunday, May 23, 2010 1:11 PM
    Friday, April 23, 2010 4:47 PM

All replies

  • A quick BING found me some good recommendations and resources.
    http://www.bing.com/search?q=SQL+Server+Capacity+Planning

    But I'd be interested to hear what others of you have done to plan for SQL Server capacity.
    Kevin Remde US IT Evangelism - Microsoft Corporation http://blogs.technet.com/kevinremde
    Thursday, December 24, 2009 12:49 PM
  • Thanks for your response. I tried all of the links- they are either dead or do not have SQL Sizing calculators- just AD and Exchange. I know that SQL is a bit more difficult to plan for than AD or Exchange but I believe there should be an minimum estimate based on the amount of users?

    Thursday, December 24, 2009 2:16 PM
  • I actually found a good article here at http://www.sqlmag.com/Article/ArticleID/96199/sql_server_96199.html
    I believe it's hard to size a db out of production but this could give you an idea of what you are facing
    Thursday, December 24, 2009 2:39 PM
  • Determine how many concurrent user sessions you are anticipating and how big the database files are.  If your database is very small, there is no reason to beef up your server.  I have seen countless SQL servers with databases under 1 GB with 4 GBs of RAM on the server.  It's just not required.  I'm not saying that there won't be a performance improvement, but it's not likely to be worth the cost.  Try configuring your server at a reasonable amount of resources, and use Performance Monitor to measure your Disk, CPU, and Memory utilization, along with SQL and IIS specific counters.  It's likely you won't need much to run a lightweight database.  Folks often throw even 4 GB of RAM for something that just doesn't need it.  Test, Monitor, Adjust, Monitor, and continue as needed until you find your appropriate values.
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Sunday, May 23, 2010 1:11 PM
    Friday, April 23, 2010 4:47 PM
  • Looking back all the post.. is interesting to see this forum have grow

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