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  • Question

  • I went to boot up my netbook today when I got home from work.  It worked fine while I was there and I had no issues since I got it, but when I started it up it was taking a very long time to boot.  There was a black screen between the initial startup image, then between the windows loading screen and once more before it went to windows login screen.  It took about 3 minutes to load to this point and it never did load the login screen completely.  The login background appeared, but there was no login box.  I have tried rebooting but to no effect.  Has anyone else had this problem?  Let me know.  Thanks.
    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 4:28 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    First, you can go to perform System File Checker in Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE). You can access WinRE using F8 at the boot menu, select Repair Your Computer to start WinRE.

     

    Also, I would like to confirm that if it is able to boot the system in safe mode. If so, I suggest try system restore in Safe mode and see if you can make any progress. You can also choose system restore from the System recovery Options.

    Most of these problems are caused by incompatible or unstable hardware devices, if Safe mode does not encounter the issue, refer to the following steps to disable them in Device Manager. In this situation, your system will only have basic hardware devices and it should be more stable.
     
    1. Click "Start"-> type in "DEVMGMT.MSC" and press Enter.
    2. Expand "Sound, video and game controllers".
    3. Right click on your sound card and then click "Properties".
    4. In the "Device Usage" dropdown menu, please choose "Do not use this device (disable)" and click OK.
    5. Please use the same method to disable other potentially unstable hardware such as the modem, network card, and CD-R drive. Please note some devices such as the video adapter cannot be disabled.
     
    Then, restart your computer. Does the issue persist?
     
    If your computer works properly, we can re-enable the devices one by one to narrow down the root cause of this issue.
     
    If the problem still exists, the problem may be with the motherboard or Central Processing Unit (CPU). If this is the case, I recommend you contact the computer vendor for more information.

     

    Regards,

     

    Sabrina

     

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

     

    • Marked as answer by Sabrina Shen Wednesday, August 18, 2010 8:39 AM
    Friday, August 13, 2010 9:03 AM

All replies

  • Here is a list of things to troubleshoot:
    • Faulty memory module . Blue screens if not caused by software are likely to be caused by bad memory. It is not unusual that a machine works perfect with Windows XP and then starts behaving badly when upgraded to Windows 7 due to changes in memory management. Use built in Windows Memory Diagnostics (on your Windows 7 machines press F8 before Windows starts to load and choose “Windows Memory Diagnostics”) to troubleshoot the memory modules.
    • Driver . Bad drivers are without doubt the most common cause for blue screens. Therefore update your drivers either by going to Windows Update or the hardware manufacturer’s web site. If no Windows 7 driver exists for the hardware go with the Windows Vista driver as good as all Vista drivers work with Windows 7.
    • BIOS . When having problems with hardware in any way and particularly blue screens I would strongly recommend a BIOS upgrade as that many times improve stability and compatibility. Also resetting the BIOS settings to the default is always a good idea.
    • Bad hard drive . Bad hard drives are sometimes causing blue screens. I recommend using Hitachi’s Drive Fitness Test, which can scan any brand of hard drives for errors.
    Friday, August 13, 2010 6:22 AM
  • Hi,

     

    First, you can go to perform System File Checker in Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE). You can access WinRE using F8 at the boot menu, select Repair Your Computer to start WinRE.

     

    Also, I would like to confirm that if it is able to boot the system in safe mode. If so, I suggest try system restore in Safe mode and see if you can make any progress. You can also choose system restore from the System recovery Options.

    Most of these problems are caused by incompatible or unstable hardware devices, if Safe mode does not encounter the issue, refer to the following steps to disable them in Device Manager. In this situation, your system will only have basic hardware devices and it should be more stable.
     
    1. Click "Start"-> type in "DEVMGMT.MSC" and press Enter.
    2. Expand "Sound, video and game controllers".
    3. Right click on your sound card and then click "Properties".
    4. In the "Device Usage" dropdown menu, please choose "Do not use this device (disable)" and click OK.
    5. Please use the same method to disable other potentially unstable hardware such as the modem, network card, and CD-R drive. Please note some devices such as the video adapter cannot be disabled.
     
    Then, restart your computer. Does the issue persist?
     
    If your computer works properly, we can re-enable the devices one by one to narrow down the root cause of this issue.
     
    If the problem still exists, the problem may be with the motherboard or Central Processing Unit (CPU). If this is the case, I recommend you contact the computer vendor for more information.

     

    Regards,

     

    Sabrina

     

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

     

    • Marked as answer by Sabrina Shen Wednesday, August 18, 2010 8:39 AM
    Friday, August 13, 2010 9:03 AM