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network access protection RRS feed

  • Question

  • i have windows 7 , do i need to turn this on , because its turned off on my computer, and how do i turn it on if it needs to be on?
    Saturday, February 19, 2011 7:12 AM

Answers

  • Hi

    Is you computer part of a domain or its your personal one and is not connected to any domain. Network Acces Protection requires that you be part of a domain, if you are not part of a domain it does not need to be on. If you are on a Domain talk to your administrator they will show you if this is rewuired in your network :)


    tech-nique
    Saturday, February 19, 2011 4:54 PM
  • Hi,

    Network Access Protection (NAP) is turned on and off on your computer by starting and stopping the napagent service. You can see this listed in the services console as Network Access Protection Agent. There are also other ways of finding out if it is running. For example at an elevated command prompt you can type "net stop napagent" and "net start napagent." To get a list of all the services that are currently running, just type "net start."

    If napagent is not running, then your computer probably cannot access a network that uses NAP. I say "probably" because the network administrator could create a rule that still allows computers on the network even if they are not running NAP. Usually you just get partial access. NAP is used to check computers before they are allowed on the network, and make sure they have the right security settings.

    If you aren't trying to access any networks that use NAP, then you don't need napagent running on your computer. You can turn the service off. Usually the only networks that are using NAP are internal company networks. You might be trying to access the network (for example) over VPN from your home PC. If they are using NAP for VPN access (called VPN enforcement), then your home computer will need to have napagent running and a couple other customized settings. Usually all these settings are configured for you using Group Policy in a domain environment.

    I hope this helps.

    -Greg

     

    Monday, February 21, 2011 9:36 AM

All replies

  • i have windows 7 , do i need to turn this on , because its turned off on my computer, and how do i turn it on if it needs to be on?


    judy lane
    Saturday, February 19, 2011 7:18 AM
  • Hi

    Is you computer part of a domain or its your personal one and is not connected to any domain. Network Acces Protection requires that you be part of a domain, if you are not part of a domain it does not need to be on. If you are on a Domain talk to your administrator they will show you if this is rewuired in your network :)


    tech-nique
    Saturday, February 19, 2011 4:54 PM
  • Hi,

    Network Access Protection (NAP) is turned on and off on your computer by starting and stopping the napagent service. You can see this listed in the services console as Network Access Protection Agent. There are also other ways of finding out if it is running. For example at an elevated command prompt you can type "net stop napagent" and "net start napagent." To get a list of all the services that are currently running, just type "net start."

    If napagent is not running, then your computer probably cannot access a network that uses NAP. I say "probably" because the network administrator could create a rule that still allows computers on the network even if they are not running NAP. Usually you just get partial access. NAP is used to check computers before they are allowed on the network, and make sure they have the right security settings.

    If you aren't trying to access any networks that use NAP, then you don't need napagent running on your computer. You can turn the service off. Usually the only networks that are using NAP are internal company networks. You might be trying to access the network (for example) over VPN from your home PC. If they are using NAP for VPN access (called VPN enforcement), then your home computer will need to have napagent running and a couple other customized settings. Usually all these settings are configured for you using Group Policy in a domain environment.

    I hope this helps.

    -Greg

     

    Monday, February 21, 2011 9:36 AM