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Microsoft Windows 7 (or workstations) performance counter recommendations RRS feed

  • Question

  • I’m looking for official Microsoft answers/documentation to the questions below:

    1. Windows 7 (or just Windows workstations) best practices for performance. This could be settings. Ex. Paging file should be set to xMB and located in the D: drive.
    2. Windows 7 threshold ranges for performance counters.
      1. Ex.  Processor\% Processor Time counter should be less than 90% usage on average for good performance. If possible, have a range. For example,  between 90%-100% usage will be danger/red, 60%-89% will be a warning/yellow, <59% will be green/good.

    Some of the performance counter recommended ranges I'm looking for:

    1. Processor\% Processor Time
    2. Processor\% Interrupt Time
    3. System\Processor Queue Length
    4. Process\Handle Count
    5. Process\Thread Count
    6. Process\Private Bytes
    7. Network Interface\Bytes Total/Sec
    8. Network Interface\Output Queue Length
    9. PhysicalDisk\Avg. Disk Sec/Read
    10. PhysicalDisk\Avg. Disk Sec/Write
    11. LogicalDisk\% Free Space
    12. PhysicalDisk\% Idle Time
    13. PhysicalDisk\Avg. Disk Queue Length
    14. Memory\Available Mbytes
    15. Memory\% Committed Bytes in Use
    16. Memory\Pages per Second
    17. Paging File\%Usage
    18. Memory\Free System Page Table Entries
    19. Memory\Pool Non-Paged Bytes
    20. Memory\Pool Paged Bytes
    21. Memory\Cache Bytes
    Thanks!
    Wednesday, October 14, 2015 12:58 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    To be honestly, it is irresponsible to throw some values to you because specific values should be defined depending on specific device. We should use performance monitor to monitor these values during daily usage. Check the data we collected then deicide.

    But there are some suggested range for some these values, check them for references.

    1. PhysicalDisk / % Idle Time – should not be less than 60%. Preferably staying at the top of your chart at all time.

    2. PhysicalDisk / Avg. Disk sec/read – should not be higher than 20ms.

    3. PhysicalDisk / Avg. Disk sec/write – should not be higher than 20ms.

    Both (2) and (3) are the ones in Performance Monitor to measure the IO latency. The higher number usually indicating a problem that is hard disk related, either a program that constantly accessing the disk more often than usual, or a hard disk is failing.

    4. PhysicalDisk / Current Disk Queue Length – should not be higher than 2.

    Memory counters

    The Memory counters are great resources to identify if your system is suffering because of the memory-related bottleneck.

    5. Memory / Available MBytes – minimum 10% of memory should be free and available. Less than that usually indicating there is insufficient memory which can increase paging activity. You should consider adding more RAM if that happens.

    6. Memory / Pages/sec – should not be higher than 1000. A number higher than that, as a result of excessive paging, usually indicates there may be a memory leak happening.

    7. Memory / Cache Bytes – indicates the amount of memory being used for the file system cache. There may be a disk bottleneck if this value is greater than 300MB.

    Network Interface counters

    These will be a great resource to diagnosis potential network bottlenecks.

    8. Network Interface / Bytes Total/sec – measures the rate at which bytes are sent and received over each network adapter.

    •healthy – less than 40% of the interface consumed

    •caution – 41% – 60%

    •critical – 61% – 100%

    9. Network Interface / Output Queue Length – measures the length of the output packet queue in packets.

    •healthy – 0

    •caution – 1-2

    •critical – >2

    Paging File counters

    10. Paging File / % Usage – should not be greater than 10%.

    Regards,

    D. Wu


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Monday, November 9, 2015 10:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Michael_LS Monday, November 9, 2015 10:01 AM
    Tuesday, November 3, 2015 6:57 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Unfortunately I am afraid that there is no general answer for page file size in all situations, so this question needs more information about the environment. But in short, put the Page file on a Different Drive, Not Partition. And about the size, let’s read following article.

    How to determine the appropriate page file size on my server (TechNet Blog)

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/mghazai/archive/2008/09/29/how-to-determine-the-appropriate-page-file-size-on-my-server.aspx

    Suggested Performance Counters to Watch from Microsoft official websites.

    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc782186%28v=ws.10%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

    Regards,

    D. Wu


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, October 19, 2015 1:32 AM
  • Thank you for the response. I am looking for suggested performance counters and metrics for workstations, specifically Windows 7 if possible.
    Monday, October 19, 2015 3:23 PM
  • Hi,

    To be honestly, it is irresponsible to throw some values to you because specific values should be defined depending on specific device. We should use performance monitor to monitor these values during daily usage. Check the data we collected then deicide.

    But there are some suggested range for some these values, check them for references.

    1. PhysicalDisk / % Idle Time – should not be less than 60%. Preferably staying at the top of your chart at all time.

    2. PhysicalDisk / Avg. Disk sec/read – should not be higher than 20ms.

    3. PhysicalDisk / Avg. Disk sec/write – should not be higher than 20ms.

    Both (2) and (3) are the ones in Performance Monitor to measure the IO latency. The higher number usually indicating a problem that is hard disk related, either a program that constantly accessing the disk more often than usual, or a hard disk is failing.

    4. PhysicalDisk / Current Disk Queue Length – should not be higher than 2.

    Memory counters

    The Memory counters are great resources to identify if your system is suffering because of the memory-related bottleneck.

    5. Memory / Available MBytes – minimum 10% of memory should be free and available. Less than that usually indicating there is insufficient memory which can increase paging activity. You should consider adding more RAM if that happens.

    6. Memory / Pages/sec – should not be higher than 1000. A number higher than that, as a result of excessive paging, usually indicates there may be a memory leak happening.

    7. Memory / Cache Bytes – indicates the amount of memory being used for the file system cache. There may be a disk bottleneck if this value is greater than 300MB.

    Network Interface counters

    These will be a great resource to diagnosis potential network bottlenecks.

    8. Network Interface / Bytes Total/sec – measures the rate at which bytes are sent and received over each network adapter.

    •healthy – less than 40% of the interface consumed

    •caution – 41% – 60%

    •critical – 61% – 100%

    9. Network Interface / Output Queue Length – measures the length of the output packet queue in packets.

    •healthy – 0

    •caution – 1-2

    •critical – >2

    Paging File counters

    10. Paging File / % Usage – should not be greater than 10%.

    Regards,

    D. Wu


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Monday, November 9, 2015 10:01 AM
    • Marked as answer by Michael_LS Monday, November 9, 2015 10:01 AM
    Tuesday, November 3, 2015 6:57 AM