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EeaData.mdf is too large RRS feed

  • Question

  • I went as far as to set these tables to 14 days:

    SC_AlertFact_Table
    SC_SampledNumericDataFact_Table
    SC_EventParameterFact_Table
    SC_AlertToEventFact_Table
    SC_EventFact_Table
    SC_AlertHistoryFact_Table

    I also verified that '14' is in fact stored in them.  Yet my DB remains at 15GB.  I have 35 clients so I don't expect this DB to be very large.

    Is there possibly some job that isn't running that purges this info?

    I don't know if it's related but I run both Forefront and SCE2007 on the same machine.  They both use MOM right?

    I appreciate any help!

    Thursday, September 24, 2009 6:53 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    As far as I know, The collection database (OnePoint database) needs to maintain 40 percent free space to enable maintenance jobs to complete successfully. If 40 percent free space is not maintained, maintenance jobs such as reindexing will fail. Please also make sure DTS job was running successfully. For more information, please refer to the following article:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb418778.aspx

     

    Regards,


    Nick Gu - MSFT
    Friday, September 25, 2009 6:59 AM
  • Pruning inside the db does not = changing the db file size on the disk.  You could have 1gb of data inside the db and still have a 15gb file on the disk.  SQL does not automatically shrink db size on the disk.
    CSS Security Support Engineer (FCS/MBSA/WUA/Incident Response) Check out my blog http://blogs.technet.com/kfalde
    Friday, September 25, 2009 2:07 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    As far as I know, The collection database (OnePoint database) needs to maintain 40 percent free space to enable maintenance jobs to complete successfully. If 40 percent free space is not maintained, maintenance jobs such as reindexing will fail. Please also make sure DTS job was running successfully. For more information, please refer to the following article:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb418778.aspx

     

    Regards,


    Nick Gu - MSFT
    Friday, September 25, 2009 6:59 AM
  • Pruning inside the db does not = changing the db file size on the disk.  You could have 1gb of data inside the db and still have a 15gb file on the disk.  SQL does not automatically shrink db size on the disk.
    CSS Security Support Engineer (FCS/MBSA/WUA/Incident Response) Check out my blog http://blogs.technet.com/kfalde
    Friday, September 25, 2009 2:07 PM
  • I ran shrink on both the DB and files.  Still 15GB.  I'll check out that URL and report back.
    Friday, September 25, 2009 4:37 PM
  • I see the default size is 15GB so I assume it'll never get smaller then that.  I further assume I should leave that alone or risk data loss?

    I was just informed the DB used to be 50GB.  I thought I heard 15 and thought the problem was still here.  So it looks like we went from 50 to 15.  Major plus!

    Thanks for the help guys!
    Friday, September 25, 2009 10:33 PM