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New IT trying to develop a domain. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I just started as IT for a 200 employees co. spread in 2 different states and running basically a complex application. i found they have the bulk of the activity in a huge airport and computers spread for several hangars placed too far to be connected using CAT5 or fiber, They have a Server 2003 running the app and DHCP but it has only a few PCs integrated to that domain; besides there's a terminal server to run the app. All other computers in the airport are joined as workgroups. The office in another state is another workgroup.

    All connections are made thru VPN but need to find a way to integrate all organization as a domain in order to administer Group Policies, printers and incorporate Symantec Ghost in a server.

    Any suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

    Friday, August 19, 2011 12:01 PM

Answers

  • 1) develop a plan. figure out your budget. let your boss know that there are some investments in technology that are necessary to bring you into this decade. the new system will be more secure and easier to manage remotely, saving time and money.

    2) you'll want domain controllers in each location. it works better that way. keep the 5 FSMO roles in the location where you're based. or even set up 2 domains, with the remote domain being a child domain. that's more complex but depending on how many computers you're supporting in each location, that might make it easier to manage should your vpn fail.

    3) the migration of workstations to the domain is not technically difficult, but can be time consuming because profiles and data are stored locally. you'll want to migrate data to the local server from the workstation, and implement a backup strategy. this requires hardware and software investments, and MONEY. let your boss know the importance of keeping data over risking it to hard disk loss.

    4) ghost in a server is going to suck over the vpn. you'll want separate ghost servers in each location. sorry, my experiences have not been more positive. for that kind of money, you might be better to invest in terminal services licensing ($80/desk last I checked). that makes the workstation builds simpler, if all they need is windows and a terminal server icon on the desktop.

    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Friday, November 11, 2011 1:58 PM
    Friday, September 2, 2011 4:12 PM
  • I would look at deploying a thin client like the new MS Windows Thin, and then user Hyper-V/Remote Desktop Services to provide a centralized user desktop management.  Should work pretty well allowing central management of apps and users, and all they need is the thin client and a connection to the internets at thier site.
    :P Advice offered, If you need more help it is advised to seek the council and advice of paid professionals. The answer is always 42, or reboot.
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Friday, November 11, 2011 1:58 PM
    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 5:52 PM

All replies

  • 1) develop a plan. figure out your budget. let your boss know that there are some investments in technology that are necessary to bring you into this decade. the new system will be more secure and easier to manage remotely, saving time and money.

    2) you'll want domain controllers in each location. it works better that way. keep the 5 FSMO roles in the location where you're based. or even set up 2 domains, with the remote domain being a child domain. that's more complex but depending on how many computers you're supporting in each location, that might make it easier to manage should your vpn fail.

    3) the migration of workstations to the domain is not technically difficult, but can be time consuming because profiles and data are stored locally. you'll want to migrate data to the local server from the workstation, and implement a backup strategy. this requires hardware and software investments, and MONEY. let your boss know the importance of keeping data over risking it to hard disk loss.

    4) ghost in a server is going to suck over the vpn. you'll want separate ghost servers in each location. sorry, my experiences have not been more positive. for that kind of money, you might be better to invest in terminal services licensing ($80/desk last I checked). that makes the workstation builds simpler, if all they need is windows and a terminal server icon on the desktop.

    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Friday, November 11, 2011 1:58 PM
    Friday, September 2, 2011 4:12 PM
  • I would look at deploying a thin client like the new MS Windows Thin, and then user Hyper-V/Remote Desktop Services to provide a centralized user desktop management.  Should work pretty well allowing central management of apps and users, and all they need is the thin client and a connection to the internets at thier site.
    :P Advice offered, If you need more help it is advised to seek the council and advice of paid professionals. The answer is always 42, or reboot.
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Friday, November 11, 2011 1:58 PM
    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 5:52 PM