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perlscript and WSH 5.8 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a set of scripts (both VBscript and PerlScript) running on an XP 32-bit machine that I need to move to a Windows 7 machine. I installed the latest version of ActivePerl and any scripts that have any Perl references crash PerlSE.dll. I've tried 32 and 64-bit ActivePerl. I've tried from the 32 and 64-bit command lines. I've even tried using 32 or 64-bit Windows 7 and it still crashes on PerlSE.dll. I've also tried using the only other community version of ActivePerl (5.18). Anyone have any ideas what the issue might be?
    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 4:28 PM

Answers

  • You will need to ask ActiveState that question.

    There is little need for perl now that we have PowerShell.


    -- Bill Stewart [Bill_Stewart]

    • Marked as answer by Bill_Stewart Monday, March 2, 2015 8:58 PM
    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 4:33 PM

All replies

  • You will need to ask ActiveState that question.

    There is little need for perl now that we have PowerShell.


    -- Bill Stewart [Bill_Stewart]

    • Marked as answer by Bill_Stewart Monday, March 2, 2015 8:58 PM
    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 4:33 PM
  • Perl kind of died on Vista at about the same time PowerShell was made available.  Since WIndows 7 comes with PowerSHell Perl is a dead issue.

    Perhaps someone at ActiveState has a patch.  Also note that WSH  on Indows 7 no longer supports many controls.


    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 4:40 PM
  • Thanks. I tried there but I haven't heard anything back yet. Just thought I would try it from this end of things.
    Wednesday, January 28, 2015 4:46 PM
  • I know this is a VERY late reply, but * these kind of non-answers (@Bill_Stewart]). Please keep it to yourself if you have nothing useful to say. Just because there is PowersHell (which is IMHO unintuitive, unforgiving and even programmer unfriendly (because it does things quite differently then one would expect if coming from 'çlose friend' c#)), is no reason to drop all other scripting tools. Heck, VBScript outperforrms PS in many occasions. Don't just blindly follow new directions and forget everything behind...






    • Edited by Rinzzz Sunday, February 2, 2020 4:50 AM
    Sunday, February 2, 2020 4:38 AM
  • I know this is a VERY late reply, but * these kind of non-answers (@Bill_Stewart]). Please keep it to yourself if you have nothing useful to say. Just because there is PowersHell (which is IMHO unintuitive, unforgiving and even programmer unfriendly (because it does things quite differently then one would expect if coming from 'çlose friend' c#)), is no reason to drop all other scripting tools. Heck, VBScript outperforrms PS in many occasions. Don't just blindly follow new directions and forget everything behind...






    Almost everything said here shows a complete lack of any technical knowledge. Anyone reading this thread needs to learn to ignore people with little skill or experience making comments based solely on dissatisfaction with advances in computer science or any science for that matter.

    Rinzz - please avoid making such uninformed comments.  They are not helpful to new users.

    VBScript is being dropped because it is old technology that can no longer access and safely manage administrative tasks.  It is based on an unsafe technology (ActiveX/COM).  PowerShell an newer technologies are based on CLR/Net Framework which is a modern rethink of COM as well as a much safer execution engine (CLR).  was dropped from all tools years ago and is not even available in any modern browser or on any current Windows platform.

    You need to learn something about modern computer engineering to understand why your comments about WSH and VBScript are not helpful.

    Consider the following question as a place to start your quest for a modern understanding of computer science:

    Why do we not still write code in binary using paper coding forms and punch cards?  After all it was simple and can do anything we want with a computer so why not just keep using it.  Why use a more complex and intellectually challenging approach to programming a computer?

    Can you answer those questions?  I bet you can't.  The prize is a six pack and a chocolate bar.


    \_(ツ)_/

    Sunday, February 2, 2020 1:06 PM