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Possible Memory Leak RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a client with a server: 

    Dell Poweredge T620
    Window Server 2008 R2 Standard x64

    32GB of RAM
    Dual 2.6GHZ Processors
    4TB of Space(2TB with RAID 10)

    AD is setup with DNS and DHCP.

    They are using SQL Express for a custom program they use internally.
    About 10 Network shares and 7 of them get mapped.

    The issue I have ran into is: the standby memory is sucked up and leaves the free memory to 0. This will happen within a few hours a fresh reboot.  

    I have tried microsofts Dynamic Cache fix...didnt work. I test SQL by stopping it completely...Still nothing.  I tried disabling all network shares, nothing still. I am kinda at a lost if there is a memory leak...how do I troubleshoot it?

    Wednesday, November 5, 2014 3:41 PM

Answers

  • Read this post please with same question - http://serverfault.com/questions/565539/huge-amount-of-standby-memory-in-resource-monitor

    "Standby

    The Standby list, which is shown in blue, contains pages that have  been removed from process working sets but are still linked to their  respective working sets. As such, Standby list is essentially a cache.  However, memory pages in the Standby list are prioritized in a range  of 0-7, with 7 being the highest. Essentially, a page related to a  high-priority process will receive a high-priority level in the  Standby list.

    For example, processes that are Shareable will be a high priority and  pages associated with these Shareable processes will have the highest  priority in the Standby list.

    Now, if a process needs a page that is associated with the process and  that page is now in the Standby list, the memory manager immediately  returns the page to that process' working set. However, all pages on  the Standby list are available for memory allocation requests from any  process. When a process requests additional memory and there is not  enough memory in the Free list, the memory manager checks the page's  priority and will take a page with a low priority from the Standby  list, initialize it, and allocate it to that process."

    As additional information sources:
    Finally a Windows Task Manager Performance tab blog!
    Where has all my Physical RAM gone?

    I think there is no problem with this behavior. "Standby" memory is using like cache. Memory still available for usage and will be provided to another process if needed.

    • Edited by Igor Teplyakov Thursday, November 6, 2014 9:13 PM add additional info
    • Proposed as answer by Susie Long Monday, November 17, 2014 2:35 AM
    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:49 AM
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 8:57 PM

All replies

  • Adding a photo
    Wednesday, November 5, 2014 3:48 PM
  • Hi!

    As first step - try install latest available updates for Windows Server and SQL.

    Wednesday, November 5, 2014 8:28 PM
  • More updates,

    Server has all Updates, I notice its mapped network files....

    The server was good four about 5hrs today and then bam... went from 4GB of Standby to 20GB of standby memory in a mere 20minutes.  I checked this out with RAMMAP from sysinternals and notice it cached every single file that was redirected.

    Did a manual redirect of all user for My Documents, Pictures, Music, Video... I have done this to about 20 servers/clients of mine and it has never had an issue till now.

    Microsoft cant figure this out, due to my case being open for a month.
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 1:26 AM
  • Read this post please with same question - http://serverfault.com/questions/565539/huge-amount-of-standby-memory-in-resource-monitor

    "Standby

    The Standby list, which is shown in blue, contains pages that have  been removed from process working sets but are still linked to their  respective working sets. As such, Standby list is essentially a cache.  However, memory pages in the Standby list are prioritized in a range  of 0-7, with 7 being the highest. Essentially, a page related to a  high-priority process will receive a high-priority level in the  Standby list.

    For example, processes that are Shareable will be a high priority and  pages associated with these Shareable processes will have the highest  priority in the Standby list.

    Now, if a process needs a page that is associated with the process and  that page is now in the Standby list, the memory manager immediately  returns the page to that process' working set. However, all pages on  the Standby list are available for memory allocation requests from any  process. When a process requests additional memory and there is not  enough memory in the Free list, the memory manager checks the page's  priority and will take a page with a low priority from the Standby  list, initialize it, and allocate it to that process."

    As additional information sources:
    Finally a Windows Task Manager Performance tab blog!
    Where has all my Physical RAM gone?

    I think there is no problem with this behavior. "Standby" memory is using like cache. Memory still available for usage and will be provided to another process if needed.

    • Edited by Igor Teplyakov Thursday, November 6, 2014 9:13 PM add additional info
    • Proposed as answer by Susie Long Monday, November 17, 2014 2:35 AM
    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Wednesday, November 19, 2014 1:49 AM
    Thursday, November 6, 2014 8:57 PM