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How to disable "Open, Save and Save As" prompt RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm using IE 10.

    I'd like to disable the prompt "Open, Save or Save as". Each time I tried to any document (ex. DOC or PDF file), IE will popup the follow prompt: "What do you want to do with ..." 

    I saw there are some similar threads, but they are particular for SharePoint. 

    Thank you!

    Peter

    IE prompt

    Friday, March 28, 2014 7:42 AM

Answers

  • Each time I tried to any document (ex. DOC or PDF file), IE will popup the follow prompt: "What do you want to do with ..." 

    You might be able to add Open with... to a right-click menu.   But that will probably only help for files which are local, e.g. don't need to be downloaded.  I think the reason for the prompt is essentially to help route the download and notify users of the fact that if they just try to open it they will be opening a temporary file.  E.g. it typically always goes into the TIF first.  You could probably confirm and refine these ideas using ProcMon, e.g. looking for tests of registry values and writes of files.

    For example, I just did a BING search for  filetype:doc, did a right-click Open (as one of the other thread's responders had suggested) and still see the above prompt, because the file has not been downloaded yet.  That's IE's job so that's how it does it, with a prompt.  But then since there is a filetype association for the .doc extension when I choose Open no more intervention is required (although as the prompt notes "The file won't be saved automatically." so if a user tries to update it, e.g. a Word document or a spreadsheet, anything they do would only be preserved if they did a File Save As... or whatever those applications provide for that use case.)

    In fact, that warning is probably the main reason for the prompt when such an explicit Open command is given.  It would be interesting to see if IE could take advantage of some information left in the filetype that would indicate that it wouldn't matter if the file was temporary because it couldn't be reused anyway--for example, if the program associated with the open action could not update the file, examples being Acrobat Reader and WordViewer.   Again, I think the simplest way to find out would be to trace what happens and make changes to try to exploit the possibilities implied by the trace.

    On another tack you could see if there are any hints or tips given by using FileTypesMan  from NirSoft.  E.g. it might help you find some particular values to try for EditFlags and BrowserFlags  (some obscure registry values which are somewhat obsolete but may still have at least some of their original effect).

     
    FYI



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 4:25 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Each time I tried to any document (ex. DOC or PDF file), IE will popup the follow prompt: "What do you want to do with ..." 

    You might be able to add Open with... to a right-click menu.   But that will probably only help for files which are local, e.g. don't need to be downloaded.  I think the reason for the prompt is essentially to help route the download and notify users of the fact that if they just try to open it they will be opening a temporary file.  E.g. it typically always goes into the TIF first.  You could probably confirm and refine these ideas using ProcMon, e.g. looking for tests of registry values and writes of files.

    For example, I just did a BING search for  filetype:doc, did a right-click Open (as one of the other thread's responders had suggested) and still see the above prompt, because the file has not been downloaded yet.  That's IE's job so that's how it does it, with a prompt.  But then since there is a filetype association for the .doc extension when I choose Open no more intervention is required (although as the prompt notes "The file won't be saved automatically." so if a user tries to update it, e.g. a Word document or a spreadsheet, anything they do would only be preserved if they did a File Save As... or whatever those applications provide for that use case.)

    In fact, that warning is probably the main reason for the prompt when such an explicit Open command is given.  It would be interesting to see if IE could take advantage of some information left in the filetype that would indicate that it wouldn't matter if the file was temporary because it couldn't be reused anyway--for example, if the program associated with the open action could not update the file, examples being Acrobat Reader and WordViewer.   Again, I think the simplest way to find out would be to trace what happens and make changes to try to exploit the possibilities implied by the trace.

    On another tack you could see if there are any hints or tips given by using FileTypesMan  from NirSoft.  E.g. it might help you find some particular values to try for EditFlags and BrowserFlags  (some obscure registry values which are somewhat obsolete but may still have at least some of their original effect).

     
    FYI



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 4:25 AM
    Answerer
  • I ran into this issue, in office 2007 run office diagnostics to repair. For newer versions of Office, run a repair and it will fix the issue.
    • Proposed as answer by dippusamongus Wednesday, October 28, 2015 11:21 AM
    Wednesday, October 28, 2015 11:19 AM