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Remove IP Address from Unplugged/Failed Network Device RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a laptop that uses a Cisco USB to Ethernet adapter, I have replaced this since the old one failed with a newer model. When I put the required fixed IP address in, I get a warning that the old device also uses this. This has caused some connection problems for me, and I am looking for a way to force remove the IP settings from the now removed device. Unfortunatly I cannot seem to find this setting anywhere, the old device does not show up under Device Manager or Network Connections, and I do not want to go into the Regestry unless I know exactly what I need to do.

    Lenovo W500 running Windows XP SP3

    Any help is appreciated.

    Gavin

    Friday, May 17, 2013 10:49 AM

Answers

  • The appropriate source of assistance with third party hardware and software is the manufacturer/publisher/vendor of that hardware and/or software.

    Search the internet only reveals on such adapter, the USBM300, which is currently supported by Linksys @ http://support.linksys.com/en-us/support/adapters/USB300M  You will find downloads for you device and a link to the Linksys forum where you may post you question.

    One approach is to uninstall the currently installed software provided for you device and then re-install it.  But Linksys may have a different solution for you.

    If the USBM300 is not the one your are using, then please identify your exact make, model, and series to aide in locating the appropriate source of assistance for your device. 


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    Friday, May 17, 2013 11:18 AM
  • Hi Gavin,

    First check the exact name of the Cisco adapter connection as it appears in your network connections

    Launch a command prompt on the laptop

    netsh interface ip set address name="nameofyourciscoadapter" source=static addr=10.0.0.1 mask=255.255.255.0 gateway=none

    You can use whichever static address you wish. I used 10.0.0.1 in this example but feel free to sub in whatever address you want. If the adapter is currently on lets say 192.168 range and your new adapter needs to use the 192.168 range, you can put the old unused adapter up on the 10.0 range and keep it out of the subnet entirely.

    M


    If you find my information useful, please rate it. :-)

    Friday, May 17, 2013 11:47 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The appropriate source of assistance with third party hardware and software is the manufacturer/publisher/vendor of that hardware and/or software.

    Search the internet only reveals on such adapter, the USBM300, which is currently supported by Linksys @ http://support.linksys.com/en-us/support/adapters/USB300M  You will find downloads for you device and a link to the Linksys forum where you may post you question.

    One approach is to uninstall the currently installed software provided for you device and then re-install it.  But Linksys may have a different solution for you.

    If the USBM300 is not the one your are using, then please identify your exact make, model, and series to aide in locating the appropriate source of assistance for your device. 


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    Friday, May 17, 2013 11:18 AM
  • Hi Gavin,

    First check the exact name of the Cisco adapter connection as it appears in your network connections

    Launch a command prompt on the laptop

    netsh interface ip set address name="nameofyourciscoadapter" source=static addr=10.0.0.1 mask=255.255.255.0 gateway=none

    You can use whichever static address you wish. I used 10.0.0.1 in this example but feel free to sub in whatever address you want. If the adapter is currently on lets say 192.168 range and your new adapter needs to use the 192.168 range, you can put the old unused adapter up on the 10.0 range and keep it out of the subnet entirely.

    M


    If you find my information useful, please rate it. :-)

    Friday, May 17, 2013 11:47 AM
    Moderator