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Project Server IOPS calculator RRS feed

Answers

  • Hi Adrian,

    I'm not aware of any IOPS recommendations being publicly available for Project Server 2010. Regarding the SQL disk configuration I would go with RAID 10 if you can. Please see the following details taken from a Performance and capacity planning white paper for Project Server 2010:

    Taken from: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff686784.aspx

    Database Server Optimizations 

    Given that Project Server 2010 is a data intensive application, optimizing your database tier can add considerable gains to performance. Please refer to SQL Server and Storage Capacity Planning and Configuration for broad guidelines on optimizing your SQL Server settings. Some of the recommendations below highlight those made in the SQL Server documentation:

    • Separate the database files and the transaction log files away from the OS drives – preferably each to their own partition. This helps by reducing IO contention between the host operating system and SQL Server, and then also between SQL database files and log files, which tend to have different update patterns depending on what recovery strategy is used.
    • SQL Server supports the use of statistics. Ensuring that the statistics are up-to-date will improve the ability of the SQL Query Optimizer.
    • Ensure that your SQL Server indexes are not fragmented.
    • Separate the TempDB onto its own partition. Split the database into several physical files – ideally, splitting it into as many files as you have processors on your database server.
    • Consider utilizing a RAID subsystem for your data needs
      • RAID 5 is recommended for medium data set sizes.
      • RAID 5 is acceptable for large dataset sizes, but RAID 10 is ideal
    • Move indexes onto their own partition
    • Project Server has been optimized to utilize the benefits of SQL CLR. Although SQL CLR is not a requirement, if available and enabled, it has the potential for increasing the performance of some operations

    Thanks

    Paul


    Paul Mather | Twitter | http://pwmather.wordpress.com

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 6:38 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Take a look at this document: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=5691

    It gives you the metrics you are looking for:

    Entity

    Description/Notes

    Small

    Medium

    Large

    1

    Projects

    100

    5000

    20000

    1

    Tasks

    17125

    856250

    3425000

    1

    Avg. Tasks Per Project

    171.25

    171.25

    171.25

    2

    Task Transaction History

    The number of times status tends to be submitted and approved for any given task

    10

    100

    1000

    1

    Assignments

    22263

    1113125

    4500000

    1

    Avg. Assignments Per Task

    1.3

    1.3

    1.3

    2/3

    Approvals

    Pending updates per manager

    50

    600

    3000

    Users

    1000

    10000

    50000

    Custom Fields

    Project (Formula)

    3

    20

    25

    Project (Manual)

    2

    40

    50

    Task (Formula)

    Task formula fields tend to take the largest toll on performance because they need to be computed for each task.

    6

    12

    15

    Task (Manual)

    4

    8

    10

    Assignment Rolldown

    50%

    50%

    50%

    Resource

    10

    20

    25

    Look up Table Custom Fields

    2

    15

    100

    1

    Timesheets (per year)

    The more you utilize Timesheets, the more resource demands will be placed on the SQL Server.

    52000

    780000

    8,320,000

    1

    Timesheet Lines

    5

    10

    10



    Prasanna Adavi, PMP, MCTS http://thinkepm.blogspot.com

    Tuesday, July 10, 2012 2:22 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    you replicated the info to determine the dataset size from the Project Server Sizing document I already mentioned. That does not include the IOPS requirements. I'm looking for something like

    small -> 1000 IOPS , medium -> 5000 IOPS, large -> 1000 IOPS Random, e.g. 1000 IOS = RAID10 with 10 SAS Disks. Or even more specific for each type of data file, log, mdf, tempdb, etc.

    What number of disks and raid level are you using for your Project Server databases?

    Thanks,

    Adrian

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 5:02 AM
  • Hi Adrian,

    I'm not aware of any IOPS recommendations being publicly available for Project Server 2010. Regarding the SQL disk configuration I would go with RAID 10 if you can. Please see the following details taken from a Performance and capacity planning white paper for Project Server 2010:

    Taken from: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff686784.aspx

    Database Server Optimizations 

    Given that Project Server 2010 is a data intensive application, optimizing your database tier can add considerable gains to performance. Please refer to SQL Server and Storage Capacity Planning and Configuration for broad guidelines on optimizing your SQL Server settings. Some of the recommendations below highlight those made in the SQL Server documentation:

    • Separate the database files and the transaction log files away from the OS drives – preferably each to their own partition. This helps by reducing IO contention between the host operating system and SQL Server, and then also between SQL database files and log files, which tend to have different update patterns depending on what recovery strategy is used.
    • SQL Server supports the use of statistics. Ensuring that the statistics are up-to-date will improve the ability of the SQL Query Optimizer.
    • Ensure that your SQL Server indexes are not fragmented.
    • Separate the TempDB onto its own partition. Split the database into several physical files – ideally, splitting it into as many files as you have processors on your database server.
    • Consider utilizing a RAID subsystem for your data needs
      • RAID 5 is recommended for medium data set sizes.
      • RAID 5 is acceptable for large dataset sizes, but RAID 10 is ideal
    • Move indexes onto their own partition
    • Project Server has been optimized to utilize the benefits of SQL CLR. Although SQL CLR is not a requirement, if available and enabled, it has the potential for increasing the performance of some operations

    Thanks

    Paul


    Paul Mather | Twitter | http://pwmather.wordpress.com

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 6:38 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Adrian,

    I have not seen any specific IOPS recommendations either.

    If you have the chance to get the budget for it:

    • RAID 1 for system
    • RAID 1 for TempDB
    • RAID 1 for Logs
    • RAID 10 for DB

    If you do lots of reporting - separate the reporting database to different disks.

    But normally the project server databases are quite small - related to SharePoint data for example. So if you like you have a good chance to put so much RAM in your SQL Server that it can hold most of the data im memory....

    Christoph

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 9:05 PM
  • This is very helpful, and yes there is a but... Using Microsoft's recommended minimum disk size for a small dataset of 80GB, what would be the breakdown of the various databases, tempDBs, and log files? I have some storage constraints and wondering if anyone has a rough estimate of size allocation for the various pieces?

    Thanks
    Callistus


    VergeOn Callistus Lucien He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors - Thomas Jefferson

    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 7:03 PM