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how to check AD accounts on computer which has join a domain? and the admin in them? not on the server computer RRS feed

  • Question

  • Windows Server can create a domain and create User Accounts.

    when a computer join this domain and login with one user, i check local  users , Groups:Administrators.  only Domain Admins

    there is no user account, only a domain user. Is there any way to check how many user login on this computer? not on server client.

    a way is to check C:\user

    yongliang_s could be an AD account or local account or msa account. how to distinguish them? and the admin in them?


    • Edited by Fred, sun Wednesday, October 12, 2016 8:44 AM clear the question
    Tuesday, October 11, 2016 5:29 AM

All replies

  • If you mean local accounts, you can use the net user command at a command prompt. Enter "net user" with no parameters to get a list of all local users. Use "net use administrator", for example, to see when the specified user last changed their password and when they last logged on.

    If you mean domain user accounts, then no, I don't know of a way to determine how many people logged into the domain from a specific computer. AD does not track which user uses which computer. You might be able to get some information from the security logs, if auditing is enabled.

    If you need this, you could configure logon scripts that log user and computer names to a shared log file. After some time you can use the log to check how many people log into each computer. The logon script, configured in a Group Policy, could be a simple as the following batch file:

    @echo off
    echo %UserName%,%ComputerName%,%Date%,%Time >> \\MyServer\MyShare\DomainLogons.log


    Richard Mueller - MVP Enterprise Mobility (Identity and Access)

    Tuesday, October 11, 2016 6:04 PM
  • is there any way to find this infomation this on specific computer?

    a way is to check C:\user

    yongliang_s could be an AD account or local account or msa account. how to distinguish them? and the admin in them?

    Wednesday, October 12, 2016 8:41 AM