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How NIC teaming work? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello.
    How NIC teaming work? Please tell me clear.
    For example, I have two NICs and each of them are 1.0 Gbps, When I use NIC teaming to merge two NICs then how this teaming work? It give me 2.0 Gbps speed but when I send a file how it work? For example, If the file size is 200MB then the file splitted and send (100MB for NIC 1 and 100MB for NIC 2) or the whole file send by using NIC 1?


    Thank you.
    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 6:45 AM

All replies

  • Hello,

    If you have two (2) NICs that each have 1Gbps, creating a NIC team will not double the speed to 2Gbps, instead you will have two (2) separate 1Gbps links with fault tolerance, so if one of the NICs go down, you'll still have one up and the team is still alive.

    You can read more about NIC teaming over here:
    NIC Teaming

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 6:57 AM
  • Hello,

    If you have two (2) NICs that each have 1Gbps, creating a NIC team will not double the speed to 2Gbps, instead you will have two (2) separate 1Gbps links with fault tolerance, so if one of the NICs go down, you'll still have one up and the team is still alive.

    You can read more about NIC teaming over here:
    NIC Teaming

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Can Microsoft offer a technology like that?

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 7:19 AM
  • What technology exactly?

    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 7:21 AM
  • What technology exactly?

    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Something that I said. File splitted between NICs then send.
    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 11:33 AM
  • No, I don't believe this is possible within Windows itself.

    But you can increase the performance itself by using a NIC team, instead of having single NICs.

    You should dedicate the NICs for different purposes, for example: have the management network separated from the other traffic.


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Wednesday, June 12, 2019 11:43 AM