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Lync and PBX Integration RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    Have created a proof of concept Lync environment complete with Enterprise Voice, Unified Messaging, inbound and outbound calls with PSTN integration via SIP trunk.  Works great!

    Now thinking about production deployment.  We have an Ericsson MD110 TDM PBX and a Mitel 3300 VoIP PBX.  The plan is to eventually retire the Ericsson MD110, office staff use Lync and "everything else" is handled by Mitel 3300.

    Users have "random" DDI numbers; we have a range we rent from the telephone company, but users get a number at "random", so that, for example, 2345 might belong to marketing, 2346 might belong to Finance, 2347 might belong to HR; don't really have contiguous ranges.

    If we deployed Lync, it would need to integrate with existing system (Mitel supports Direct SIP - hooray!), and when a user moves telephony to Lync, they bring their existing number with them.  How do we do this?  Lync would be phased and gradual, rather than big bang.  Have had a look at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/gg412758.aspx and http://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/gg425853.aspx - no suggestions.  A blog posting somewhere suggested a gateway in between each system and the PSTN, so incoming calls would be routed to the appropriate platform (Mitel or Lync).  Not so keen on this.

    Realise this is most definitely a non-trivial question, but there's practically no information about this I can find anywhere!

    Thanks in advance.

    Anwar 

    • Moved by Sharon.Shen Monday, January 9, 2012 7:36 AM PBX integration (From:Planning and Deployment)
    Thursday, January 5, 2012 6:19 PM

Answers

  • Understand that you'll be migrating your users to Lync Enterprise Voice, however, this would be a phase project and they'll be users still using the traditional phone and some would be using the Lync Client for PSTN calls.

    Based on the couple of Enterprise Voice deployments that I'd went through, I think co-existing with your existing PBX and link the additional trunk to your SIP Gateway (or IP-PBX) would be the best option. Which means your MD110 will still be the front-liner to connect to your ISP, with that, you can now plan which department/numbers to be redirected to the trunk card that connects to the SIP Gateway.

    For the ease of your deployment, you may refer to a sketch that I've provided to most of my customers:

    As all of your numbers are trunked through the same ISDN trunking, you'll just need to ask your PBX to "reprogram" the numbers that is in your batch migration according.

    This way, you wouldn't need too much of a complication on configuring the Voice part PLUS can you still have your internal calls routed within premise instead of throwing out the ISP and coming back.

    Hope this helps!

    PS: Apologies for the messy sketch!


    James Ooi MCITP Lync Server 2010 | Blog: http://jamesosw.wordpress.com Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread
    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:25 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Friday, January 6, 2012 6:11 AM
  • You are correct, if you define someone with a local number on Lync, it will route their prior to performing outbound routing. The thing to keep in mind is to create your local users as E.164, normalizing the extensions, then convert anything you need to route to the PBX within the Trunk Configuration. The PBX can be hard forwarded to a pilot + extension, and you could normalize these numbers on Lync into the recommended E.164. A gateway would probably provide an easier migration path and most actually have some integration into AD or some migration features. Hope this helps. You are doing the right thing to planning prior to implementing.

     

    Cheers,

    Jeff Colvin

    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Saturday, January 7, 2012 2:43 AM
  • Hi Anwar,

    You can do either ways to co-exist between Lync or the PBX. However, bear in mind that since you're moving from the existing PBX to Lync, to have Lync to 'prime' the incoming calls and redirecting it to the PBX, you'll still need a gateway, unless your PBX supports direct SIP/SIP trunking.

    You would also need to consider the effort and changes required within your PBX if Lync is going to be the front-liner for your Enterprise Voice system. Since you're using Exchange as an example, if you're migrating from a legacy Exchange 200x to Exchange 2010, you would need to apply the same concept as well: create a routing between the 2 platforms and not introducing too much of a changes within the existing Exchange 200x

    Some recommendations to this approach:

    1. You can enable all of your users for Lync and gradually enable them as Enterprise Voice accroding to your batch migration
    2. Define your Normalization rules, let's say for those users whom are still on the TDM-PBX, they would need to dial 7, followed-up the 4-digits extension

    Using this approach would also allow you to fully 'test' the Lync environmnet before moving the users and enabling Enterprise Voice for them.

    Hope this helps.


    James Ooi MCITP Lync Server 2010 | Blog: http://jamesosw.wordpress.com Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread
    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 17, 2012 9:23 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 7:38 AM

All replies

  • Understand that you'll be migrating your users to Lync Enterprise Voice, however, this would be a phase project and they'll be users still using the traditional phone and some would be using the Lync Client for PSTN calls.

    Based on the couple of Enterprise Voice deployments that I'd went through, I think co-existing with your existing PBX and link the additional trunk to your SIP Gateway (or IP-PBX) would be the best option. Which means your MD110 will still be the front-liner to connect to your ISP, with that, you can now plan which department/numbers to be redirected to the trunk card that connects to the SIP Gateway.

    For the ease of your deployment, you may refer to a sketch that I've provided to most of my customers:

    As all of your numbers are trunked through the same ISDN trunking, you'll just need to ask your PBX to "reprogram" the numbers that is in your batch migration according.

    This way, you wouldn't need too much of a complication on configuring the Voice part PLUS can you still have your internal calls routed within premise instead of throwing out the ISP and coming back.

    Hope this helps!

    PS: Apologies for the messy sketch!


    James Ooi MCITP Lync Server 2010 | Blog: http://jamesosw.wordpress.com Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread
    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:25 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Friday, January 6, 2012 6:11 AM
  • Hi James,

    Thanks for this, that is helpful.

    However, how would a migrate a user from an analogue phone on the TDM PBX to a Lync endpoint, keeping their extension number unchanged.

    The TDM PBX would need to know to now route calls to that particular extension to Lync, and Lync would need to know that there are other extensions that aren't being handled by Lync but by the TDM PBX.

    For example, with Exchange, you have the concept of a "shared domain", and "mail contacts", so that Exchange knows there are some addresses in the same mail domain (for example, @microsoft.com) which exist on another mail server, so an address it doesn't recognise isn't simply rejected as an unknown user, but simply forwarded to the other mail server to handle.

    Realise this depends on specific TDM PBXs, but can't find anything at the Lync end either.

    One option I thought of was have the TDM PBX keep the original extension number and forward the call to a different Lync extension, then set the outgoing caller ID on Lync to to the original extension number as well, and have the Lync user have both the old and new extension number.  Sure there are holes in this, and it might be crude.  Forgive my limited understanding.  Would I need to create a route entry for every TDM PBX extension in the Voice Routing/Route part of the Lync Control Panel?

    Gradual migration might go like this;

    initial

    user extension PBX
    Alice 101 analogue
    Bob 102 analogue
    Charles 103 analogue

    stage 1

    user extension PBX
    Alice 101 Lync
    Bob 102 analogue
    Charles 103 analogue

    stage 2

    user extension PBX
    Alice 101 Lync
    Bob 102 Lync
    Charles 103 analogue

    stage 3

    user extension PBX
    Alice 101 Lync
    Bob 102 Lync
    Charles 103 Lync

     Throughout the migration, both the analogue and Lync systems need to know which PBX is responsible for which extension and route calls accordingly.

     

    Kind regards,

    Anwar


    Friday, January 6, 2012 11:26 AM
  • Hi All,

    One scenario is shown at http://ucken.blogspot.com/2011/11/migrating-pbx-users-to-lync-enterprise.html

    However, I doubt I'd get buyin to putting a gateway between the PBX and PSTN!

    Kind regards,

    Anwar

    Friday, January 6, 2012 11:37 AM
  • It seems Lync can forward to the PBX as a default route;

    http://ucken.blogspot.com/2011/01/enterprise-voice-best-practices-in-lync_21.html

    You can create a blanket rule that just forwards everything to the PBX. The default route that Lync creates can do that job for you. If you dial a number and it doesn't match an Enterprise Voice enabled user, it will route out to your PBX.

    Friday, January 6, 2012 11:43 AM
  • You are correct, if you define someone with a local number on Lync, it will route their prior to performing outbound routing. The thing to keep in mind is to create your local users as E.164, normalizing the extensions, then convert anything you need to route to the PBX within the Trunk Configuration. The PBX can be hard forwarded to a pilot + extension, and you could normalize these numbers on Lync into the recommended E.164. A gateway would probably provide an easier migration path and most actually have some integration into AD or some migration features. Hope this helps. You are doing the right thing to planning prior to implementing.

     

    Cheers,

    Jeff Colvin

    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Saturday, January 7, 2012 2:43 AM
  • Hi Anwar,

    You can do either ways to co-exist between Lync or the PBX. However, bear in mind that since you're moving from the existing PBX to Lync, to have Lync to 'prime' the incoming calls and redirecting it to the PBX, you'll still need a gateway, unless your PBX supports direct SIP/SIP trunking.

    You would also need to consider the effort and changes required within your PBX if Lync is going to be the front-liner for your Enterprise Voice system. Since you're using Exchange as an example, if you're migrating from a legacy Exchange 200x to Exchange 2010, you would need to apply the same concept as well: create a routing between the 2 platforms and not introducing too much of a changes within the existing Exchange 200x

    Some recommendations to this approach:

    1. You can enable all of your users for Lync and gradually enable them as Enterprise Voice accroding to your batch migration
    2. Define your Normalization rules, let's say for those users whom are still on the TDM-PBX, they would need to dial 7, followed-up the 4-digits extension

    Using this approach would also allow you to fully 'test' the Lync environmnet before moving the users and enabling Enterprise Voice for them.

    Hope this helps.


    James Ooi MCITP Lync Server 2010 | Blog: http://jamesosw.wordpress.com Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread
    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 17, 2012 9:23 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, February 2, 2012 9:39 AM
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 7:38 AM
  • Hi,Anwar,

    Hope you have got the key points about your migration scenario from the above guys and Ken's blog.

    Also I suggest you ask the Mitel engineer to get the detailed direct sip configuration guide,details you can check the following old thread.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-AU/ocsvoice/thread/bea5ed59-d99e-4b80-b4bc-7ec8a1ce26d3

    Hope this useful!

    Regards


    Sharon Shen

    TechNet Community Support

    ******************************************************************************************************************************************************* Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community memb
    • Edited by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:26 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, January 17, 2012 9:23 AM
    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 9:25 AM
  • Hi Sharon,

    Thanks for your reply - that old post looks helpful!

    Thanks again to James and Jeff.  Your replies have given me reassurance that this will be achievable!

    Kind regards,

    Anwar

    Tuesday, January 10, 2012 11:33 AM