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Changed MoBo and CPU and Vista Business Won't Boot of re-Install as Upgrade RRS feed

  • Question

  • I had a Pentium-D that ran as hot as a firecracker. One day the Pentium-D died and I had to replace the CPU. The MoBo only supported the Pentium-D and 2.16 GHz Core 2 Duos which are no longer available, so I decided to replace the Mobo and the CPU. Got A GSI MoBo and an Intel 8400e 3.0 Ghz CPU along with new 2 GB 800 Mhz DDRII Corsair TWIN2X2048-6400C4 Dual Channel Ram. I got everything installed and started the system and made the necessary changes to the BIOS entries and started Windows Vista, but all I got was a momentary flash of the windows Vistat Install install slider and then the system rebooted in a continuous loop. I have ten accounts on this machine and have a month old file back-up but I can't get to the back-up because it is on a USB drive and the Vista CD Setup routine won't regognize the USB drive. I did everthing that the Vista installer suggested. I ran the Repair Computer rountine and was given a dialogue box that Windows was Successfully Repaired and that I could now restart my computer, which I did, only problem, windows still wouldn't boot and just instantly restarted the computer in a continuous loop. I tired to do a re-install upgrade, but the upgrade option was grayed and I was only given the option of a clean install, obliterating the hundreds of hours invested in creating user accounts, custom destops that are actually functionally organized and everything else like screen resolution and appearance tweeks etc etc. I would like to boot back into the old installation, update drivers to reflect the changes to the system, so that I can just go on as before, the hardware failure was grief enough, without wasting dozens of more hours doing a fresh install. Microsoft won't help unless I agree to a $250.00 per support call per issue support session. And the email and chat require a $59.00 per issue payment as well. I don't feel this is an issue that I should pay Microsoft to provide a solution for as it is really an issue with their install and repair routine. I think the issue is Windows determined that it is now on a different computer than originally installed and that this is a license violation and refuses to start as a rsult. I should be able to get a tech at Microsoft to tell me how to resolve this issue once I present a valid serial number. I can't get my activation number because it's stored in Windows and I can't boot Windows to get any information and Microsoft now wants more that the cost of Windows Vista Ultimate to resolve the issue.

     

    Any suggestions would be very much appreciated.

    Tuesday, July 29, 2008 5:46 PM

Answers

  • Hi Edgar,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    Normally after changing the motherboard, the system will not boot and we will need to reinstall the system. However, sometimes the system still can still boot if the motherboards’ differences are not quite n’t much. Although they can still boot, the system is not as stable as before and BSOD/Auto Restarting may occur. Therefore, you’d better reinstall the system after changing the motherboard even if it can still boot.

     

    Now I recommend you try the suggestion in my previous post to perform a parallel install of Windows Vista, backup your important files and then reinstall Windows Vista.

     

    If anything is unclear, please feel free to let me know.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Friday, August 1, 2008 7:39 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Edgar,

     

    Please understand CPU and motherboard are the most important parts on the computer. If we replace them, the original system is probably unable to boot. In most cases, we have to reinstall the system. This issue should not be related to the license.

     

    Based on the current situation, I suggest focusing on retrieving your important files from the original system.

     

    It is hard for us to repair the original system. I recommend performing a parallel install of Windows Vista.

     

    A Parallel Install is a new installation for Windows Vista, which is similar to a Clean Install. However, when performing a Parallel Install, the current system will not be affected. To perform a Parallel Installation of Windows Vista, we just need to select another disk drive or partition when performing the installation. This will install a new system and we can then recover all personal data after performing the installation.

     

    Parallel Install of Windows Vista
    =========================
    1. Start the computer by using the Windows Vista DVD. To do this, insert the Windows Vista DVD in the computer's DVD drive, and then restart the computer.

    2. When the "Press any key to boot from CD" message is displayed on the screen, press a key.
    3. Follow the instructions that are displayed on the screen to type in the product key and accept the Licensing Agreement.
    4. Click Next and choose the Custom (Advanced) option.
    5. Select another disk drive and click Next.
    6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation.

     

    Now you can obtain your important files from the newly installed Windows Vista system. Backup them to an external drive or DVD and then you can format the drive and reinstall Windows Vista.

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Thursday, July 31, 2008 3:31 AM
    Moderator
  • Yes, but hasn't windows been modular since NT. Isn't the only thing necessary for Windows to boot after a CPU and MoBo change is replacing the HAL with one that addresses the new services on the new MoBo and CPU? With previous versions of windows, I could have taken the Hard Drive out of the computer, installed it in another computer and the only modification I would have had to make is to ensure that the new system correctly identifies the hard Drive and that it is set as master and not slave and after starting Windows call Microfsoft and get a new activation number. Why is this no longer possible in Windows Vista?
    Thursday, July 31, 2008 5:24 PM
  • Hi Edgar,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    Normally after changing the motherboard, the system will not boot and we will need to reinstall the system. However, sometimes the system still can still boot if the motherboards’ differences are not quite n’t much. Although they can still boot, the system is not as stable as before and BSOD/Auto Restarting may occur. Therefore, you’d better reinstall the system after changing the motherboard even if it can still boot.

     

    Now I recommend you try the suggestion in my previous post to perform a parallel install of Windows Vista, backup your important files and then reinstall Windows Vista.

     

    If anything is unclear, please feel free to let me know.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Friday, August 1, 2008 7:39 AM
    Moderator