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Split Tasks RRS feed

  • Question

  • In my project I want to track multiple start and stop dates of multiple activities.
    Activities durations are ranging in several weeks to months while it is not convenient to perform the same via Gantt Chart.
    Is there an option or enterprise custom field that could be developed to enter multiple start and stop dates in the lifecycle of an activity. While as an output of the same how many days the work was not done could also be computed.
    Thank You
    Thursday, August 1, 2019 4:01 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    It depends on what you are trying to achieve. 

    If it is just a question of visualization in MS Project, you could use local start and finish dates. The pros is that you can use them also in the gantt chart bar style to visualize the splits.

    See this example: https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/a596bb34-3808-4be7-8139-85c4b3a9c1a1/use-custom-fields-in-gantt-chart-in-project-server-2013?forum=project2010custprog

    You can also use those local custom fields in PWA. See my article about this:

    https://psbehindthescene.blogspot.com/2018/01/how-to-display-phases-and-milestones-in.html

    You can then create other custom fields to have the durations between those custom start and finish dates.

    The cons is that you cannot report on those fields (odata, PowerBI etc...). Note also that if you assign resources, they will be assigned on the entire task, without considering the local dates. 

    The workaround would be then to create different tasks instead of a unique splitted task.


    Hope this helps,


    Guillaume Rouyre, MBA, MVP, P-Seller

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 7:43 AM
    Moderator
  • Richitra,

    That’s good advice from Guillaume.  As technically applied, task splits are often unintentional and unsightly.  I avoid them except where imposed by logic or resource leveling.  Where explicitly planned in advance, I’d lean towards breaking your weeks/months-long tasks into smaller pieces and scheduling them directly.

    If it is mandatory to schedule these task stops and starts using Project’s task split functionality, then the alternative to clicking and dragging bars is vba/macro code that references some local custom date or start/finish fields.  The code wouldn’t need to be very extensive, but it would have to be very customized to your particular workflow.  (Look for the task.Split method, which inserts non-working intervals into the task, and the task.SplitParts collection, which can be used to count the splits and manipulate the working intervals that remain.) 

    When using task splits, you can easily aggregate the non-working time in a custom duration field with a formula like this one:  ProjDateDiff([Start],[Finish])-[Duration].

    Good luck, tom

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 3:21 PM
  • I'd rather suggest to have multiple tasks instead of a splitted tasks, so you can track status, reason, workload/duration.

    That being said, you just answered to the first sentence in my entire reply above. I'll let you go through and tell us if it helps.


    Hope this helps,


    Guillaume Rouyre, MBA, MVP, P-Seller

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 3:21 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    It depends on what you are trying to achieve. 

    If it is just a question of visualization in MS Project, you could use local start and finish dates. The pros is that you can use them also in the gantt chart bar style to visualize the splits.

    See this example: https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/a596bb34-3808-4be7-8139-85c4b3a9c1a1/use-custom-fields-in-gantt-chart-in-project-server-2013?forum=project2010custprog

    You can also use those local custom fields in PWA. See my article about this:

    https://psbehindthescene.blogspot.com/2018/01/how-to-display-phases-and-milestones-in.html

    You can then create other custom fields to have the durations between those custom start and finish dates.

    The cons is that you cannot report on those fields (odata, PowerBI etc...). Note also that if you assign resources, they will be assigned on the entire task, without considering the local dates. 

    The workaround would be then to create different tasks instead of a unique splitted task.


    Hope this helps,


    Guillaume Rouyre, MBA, MVP, P-Seller

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 7:43 AM
    Moderator
  • I am trying to track currently:

    1. Number of instances while the work was not done

    2. Categorize reasons (Eg. Customer, Internal...)

    3. Productive Time (Duration-Work)

    4. Current state (Work stopped, ongoing)


    Thursday, August 1, 2019 3:09 PM
  • Richitra,

    That’s good advice from Guillaume.  As technically applied, task splits are often unintentional and unsightly.  I avoid them except where imposed by logic or resource leveling.  Where explicitly planned in advance, I’d lean towards breaking your weeks/months-long tasks into smaller pieces and scheduling them directly.

    If it is mandatory to schedule these task stops and starts using Project’s task split functionality, then the alternative to clicking and dragging bars is vba/macro code that references some local custom date or start/finish fields.  The code wouldn’t need to be very extensive, but it would have to be very customized to your particular workflow.  (Look for the task.Split method, which inserts non-working intervals into the task, and the task.SplitParts collection, which can be used to count the splits and manipulate the working intervals that remain.) 

    When using task splits, you can easily aggregate the non-working time in a custom duration field with a formula like this one:  ProjDateDiff([Start],[Finish])-[Duration].

    Good luck, tom

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 3:21 PM
  • I'd rather suggest to have multiple tasks instead of a splitted tasks, so you can track status, reason, workload/duration.

    That being said, you just answered to the first sentence in my entire reply above. I'll let you go through and tell us if it helps.


    Hope this helps,


    Guillaume Rouyre, MBA, MVP, P-Seller

    Thursday, August 1, 2019 3:21 PM
    Moderator