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NetApp CIFS shares and backing up with DPM 2010 RRS feed

  • Question

  • All,

    I know that DPM uses the VSS to backup Windows boxes, applications like Exchange, etc., and that it also requires the agent to be installed on the host to be backed up in order to work.

    But I am wondering if there is a way to somehow get a Windows server to see CIFS shares from a NetApp device as drives that DPM could then back up?  We really don't want to have to go down the road of buying NDMP licenses as well as backup software that is NDMP compatible, so I'm looking for creative ways I can use the product we already purchased (DPM 2010) to do this.

    Even if there were some way to sync software from the filer to a local drive on another server, then back that server up, it might work.

    Any thoughts on this?

    • Moved by MarcReynolds Tuesday, September 21, 2010 12:02 PM (From:Data Protection Manager)
    Wednesday, September 15, 2010 3:18 AM

Answers

  • In my experience, you will have to copy the data from the CIFS share that you want backed up and put it on a server that has a DPM agent so you can get a backup using DPM 2010.

    But my question though is, why do you want to use DPM to backup the CIFS shares? Is it for recovery of files or Disaster Recovery of the system? DPM is not a good option for backing up CIFS shares because you have to really work around the limitations of DPM not being able to interact with the CIFS shares natively.

    If you are looking for a Disaster Recovery option, then using the method of copying to a windows server so DPM can pick it up is one option. The other that is not DPM, is probably to use some sort of replication built into the CIFS share hardware to another device off-site

    If you are just looking for file recovery, I'm pretty sure that the NAS device has built in snapshot technology that will suffice. If you are using windows, the built in snapshot technology usually integrates with Windows very well to allow users to restore files themselves when needed.

    Hope this helps.

    Friday, September 17, 2010 6:49 PM

All replies

  • Hey,

    I'm not really familiar with CIFS shares but I do know that DPM does not support it as it uses block-level protection.

    However, if it would be possible to run a prebackup script from DPM that xcopy all the files from the CIFS to a local folder on a windows box, then you would have your data.  Note, I have never did this with a netapp cifs share so I'm afraid it would be testing first

    Just my 2 cents,

    Cheers,

    Mike Resseler


    Visit System Center User Group Belgium @ http://scug.be and http://scug.be/blogs/scdpm
    Wednesday, September 15, 2010 7:00 AM
    Moderator
  • I don't have NetApp, but EMC has a hardware VSS provider that allows me to use the SAN Sanpshot capabilities from within DPM...Maybe Netapp has the same thing?
    Wednesday, September 15, 2010 4:18 PM
  • Would you be able to point me in the direction that you are using the EMC hardware VSS provider to use SAN Snapshots? I thought this was only used to attach snapshots of LUNs to the DPM server so that it could create replicas from local disk instead of copying over the wire

    Friday, September 17, 2010 6:15 PM
  • In my experience, you will have to copy the data from the CIFS share that you want backed up and put it on a server that has a DPM agent so you can get a backup using DPM 2010.

    But my question though is, why do you want to use DPM to backup the CIFS shares? Is it for recovery of files or Disaster Recovery of the system? DPM is not a good option for backing up CIFS shares because you have to really work around the limitations of DPM not being able to interact with the CIFS shares natively.

    If you are looking for a Disaster Recovery option, then using the method of copying to a windows server so DPM can pick it up is one option. The other that is not DPM, is probably to use some sort of replication built into the CIFS share hardware to another device off-site

    If you are just looking for file recovery, I'm pretty sure that the NAS device has built in snapshot technology that will suffice. If you are using windows, the built in snapshot technology usually integrates with Windows very well to allow users to restore files themselves when needed.

    Hope this helps.

    Friday, September 17, 2010 6:49 PM