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Subnet mask scopes for printers and routers RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a network of three static WANs, a firewall thin client, Windows Server, 2012 one Hyper-V machine, several routers, a couple access points, and several printers. 

    My WAN addresses are required to have a distinct subnet mask on my firewall, for example 192.168.0.1, 192.168.1.1, 192.168.2.1.

    My firewall has an IP like 192.168.3.1, so that makes my server's static IP 192.168.3.2, and the Hyper-V machine that I run inside with DCHP, DNS, and AD installed 192.168.3.3.

    I would like to consolidate my routers into their own subnet mask but I don't know if that would be the correct way of going about keeping my routers organized and memorizable. So for my routers, I'm thinking that you have to create a scope. In my case I'd like to make its subnet mask 192.168.4.x. However, I'm not too sure if the scope ensures that the printers communicate with my gateway (192.168.3.1). Am I stuck with having to use 192.168.3.x and rather a range I have to decide for my printers?

    I have the same question for my routers. Can I create a subnet mask scope for my routers ie. 192.168.5.x that will work with my gateway of (192.168.3.1)?

    Thursday, February 4, 2016 6:13 AM

Answers

  • Hi balderoine,

    Routers are used to connect several subnets, for example, router 1 is used to connect subnet1 192.168.0.0/24 and subnet2 192.168.1.0/24. Then the router needs to have at least two NICs, NIC1 with IP address 192.168.0.x and NIC2 with IP address 192.168.1.x. Then both subnets could access the router, and the route table could enable subnet1 and subnet2 communicate with each other. So, we don't need to create an additional "scope" (as you said) for the router.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:23 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi balderoine,

    Routers are used to connect several subnets, for example, router 1 is used to connect subnet1 192.168.0.0/24 and subnet2 192.168.1.0/24. Then the router needs to have at least two NICs, NIC1 with IP address 192.168.0.x and NIC2 with IP address 192.168.1.x. Then both subnets could access the router, and the route table could enable subnet1 and subnet2 communicate with each other. So, we don't need to create an additional "scope" (as you said) for the router.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, February 4, 2016 8:23 AM
    Moderator
  • I meant to say a Super Scope I wanted to make one single logical scope out of the different IP subnet masks. But I ended up doing it the way you mentioned.
    Friday, February 5, 2016 1:01 PM
  • Hi balderoine,

    DHCP protocol use broadcast, so if DHCP clients and DHCP servers in different subnets, we need to set up DHCP relay agent to relay packets between different subnet.

    DHCP super scope unit multiple scopes into one and make it easy to manage, but for DHCP clients in different subnets, we still need DHCP relay agent.

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, February 19, 2016 9:25 AM
    Moderator