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  • Question

  • Hello,

    I am having significant trouble today with this error message on BSOD

    0x0000001E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005  0xFFFFF80003308331,0x0000000000000000,0x00000000000005E7)

    Opening and closing a number of times gives same error.

    Opened again in safe mode with networking, this helps, but some capabilities seem reduced (maybe this is normal in safe mode?? - e.g. Office programs now ask for registration key despite working previously; also can't access windows update,   error in the audio service : 'Both the Windows Audio and the Windows Audio End Point Builder services must be running for audio to work correctly. At least one of these services isn't running"

    I can upload minidump file if that helps - not quite sure where to upload to, tho.

    Many thanks for any help.

    Sunday, June 16, 2013 5:05 PM

Answers

  • Tab99

    My gut feeling says it is your Symantec.  I would remove and replace it with MSE at least until you stop crashing.

    These crashes were caused by memory corruption (probably a driver--Symantec?).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  


    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent

    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next" (or  Type "verifier /standard /all"  (no quotes) if you want to verify all of them (this will slow your computer down))
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and for win 8 dont check Concurrency stress test, and DDI compliance checking click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617

    Symantec  is a frequent cause of BSOD's.  


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by tracycai Tuesday, June 25, 2013 9:02 AM
    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 7:54 AM

All replies

  • Sorry here is URL for minidump file https://skydrive.live.com/#cid=6BEA64078E888A23&id=6BEA64078E888A23%21188
    Sunday, June 16, 2013 5:16 PM
  • Hi,

    Since the issue do not appear in safe mode, the cause can be the disabled hardware drivers or disabled services.
    Please boot into Clean Boot Mode to test the issue again.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929135

    If the everything is fine in clean boot mode, please take the step 2-step 7 in Clean Boot to determine which program or service maybe causing the issue.

    Meanwhile, you can refer to:
    Bug Check 0x1E: KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff557408(v=vs.85).aspx


    Tracy Cai
    TechNet Community Support

    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 7:36 AM
  • Tab99

    My gut feeling says it is your Symantec.  I would remove and replace it with MSE at least until you stop crashing.

    These crashes were caused by memory corruption (probably a driver--Symantec?).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  


    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent

    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next" (or  Type "verifier /standard /all"  (no quotes) if you want to verify all of them (this will slow your computer down))
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and for win 8 dont check Concurrency stress test, and DDI compliance checking click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617

    Symantec  is a frequent cause of BSOD's.  


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by tracycai Tuesday, June 25, 2013 9:02 AM
    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 7:54 AM