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My c: has two my document folders RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have 2 my document folders in my c: , both folders duplicate files , when I erase one file it also duplicate in other folder. I have 2 of everything... how do I delete one . somehow one is called my documents and the other jpr's documents. Please help , it takes up space on my c: drive . thanks
    I still use windows 2k has I had problems with xp....
    J roma
    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 4:31 PM

Answers

  • Some old programs may request the original folder location to save some files. For example, if a program requests the c:\documents and settings folder which does not exist in Windows 7. system will create the junction so we will get a c:\documents and settings which actually point to c:\Users folder.

     

    It is not recommended to remove the junction. They will not waste extra drive space.

     

    Thursday, October 22, 2009 3:21 AM

All replies


  • Second one is a shortcut. You can't see it unless you (**rightclick folder, Properties Security Tab Edit remove Everyone).

    Even more interesting in explorer left pane, under Desktop, under Libraries,
    in your (username) Folder: click/expand AppData click Local click Application Data shortcut if you can't get in do **.... you will see another Application Data folder shortcut. You can loop through clicking them 25 times before you see the non shortcut Application Data folder. Count them. Gets slower as you proceed. Some kind of index structure. Same in Vista.

    Looks like a nested (Don't Bother to) Do Loop awesome.

    Tuesday, October 20, 2009 6:30 PM
  • {{
    Wow I like brevity, a URL is worth <=> a thousand words. There's the Majiq number 26! But what have RSS or Volume mount points got to do with index/access/search of 
    a)SingleHomeUser PC's User folder? as compared to 
    b)BuisnessUser      PC's - one among many networked across company/country.
    I don't think I did anything (RSS,volume mount) to cause junction. Mabe Media center music, picture folder settings; maybe Windows Live things (sync,upload,phone) that I didn't want.
    I don't think you mean to say that I should delete Junction
    }}

    From URL: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896768.aspx
    You can surpass the 26 drive letter limitation by using NTFS junction points. By using junction points, you can graft a target folder onto another NTFS folder or "mount" a volume onto an NTFS junction point. Junction points are transparent to programs.

    Reparse points are the mechanism on which NTFS junctions are based, and they are used by Windows' Remote Storage Service (RSS), as well as volume mount points.
    To delete a junction, use the –d switch:
    junction -d c:\Program-Files
    To list junctions beneath a directory, include the –s switch:
    junction -s c:\

    From CMD using Admin, List Junctions:

    \\?\c:\\Users\All Users\Application Data\Application Data\Application Data\Docum
    ents\My Pictures: JUNCTION
       Print Name     : C:\Users\Public\Pictures
       Substitute Name: C:\Users\Public\Pictures

    \\?\c:\\Users\All Users\Application Data\Application Data\Application Data\Docum
    ents\My Videos: JUNCTION
       Print Name     : C:\Users\Public\Videos
       Substitute Name: C:\Users\Public\Videos

    List goes on and on

    Wednesday, October 21, 2009 7:37 PM
  • Some old programs may request the original folder location to save some files. For example, if a program requests the c:\documents and settings folder which does not exist in Windows 7. system will create the junction so we will get a c:\documents and settings which actually point to c:\Users folder.

     

    It is not recommended to remove the junction. They will not waste extra drive space.

     

    Thursday, October 22, 2009 3:21 AM
  • I have a similar problem on VIsta with the Pictures folder. I delete it, it just comes back. I hope there's an easier solution than above that would need a LOT of study to figure out. Thanks.
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 2:51 PM
  • To clarify: I have an extra pictures folder with no content that somehow got created a few months ago.
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 2:52 PM
  • A quick way to see if you have a shortcut to a folder in the same place as the actual folder is to open a CMD window, CD to the parent folder (the one that seems to have two entries), and use DIR to resolve what's going on.  To wit:

    1.  Click the Start orb.
    2.  Enter CMD in the search box and hit Enter.
    3.  Once the window opens up, use the CD command to navigate to the folder in which the pair of files exists.  For example: CD \
    4.  Type DIR "filename*.*" (then hit Enter) where filename is the name of the folder you're seeing multiples of.  For example:  DIR "My*.*"
    5.  You should see what's really happening.

    Also, it is often helpful enable the display of file extensions (i.e., the .xxx that follows the filename or folder name).

    To do this, follow these steps:

    1.  Open an Explorer window.
    2.  Click the Organize button, then click Layout -> Menu bar
    3.  Now click the Tools menu, and select Folder Options.
    4.  In the Folder Options dialog, click the View tab, then UNcheck [ ] Hide extensions for known file types.

    -Noel
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 10:02 PM