locked
Similar Program for Windows 2000? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I am looking for something similar to Steadystate or the shared computer toolkit, but I can't use either because I am limited to Windows 2000.  It is for a computer that will be installed on a production line, so I need a number of restrictions on its applications.  Is there an older program (or anything else I can do) that works to roughly the same effect?

    Thanks.

    Friday, July 13, 2007 6:37 PM

Answers

  • Unfortunately, SteadyState could not be installed on Windows 2000 computer; meanwhile, there is no similar software that works on Windows 2000. To lock down a Windows 2000 computer, you may configure local group policy to configure restrictions. For example, to prevent users from running a specific application, you can configure the [User Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Don't run specified Windows applications] group policy. Meanwhile, the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article is a good reference on how to lock down a computer although it is written for a terminal session. The underlying concept is similar.

     

    278295 How to Lock Down a Windows 2000 Terminal Server Session

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=278295

     

    With the following settings, even the administrator account will have restricted access. To prevent administrator from applying these policies, please refer to the following Microsoft Knowlede Base article:

     

    325351 HOW TO: Apply Local Policies to All Users Except Administrators on

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=325351

    Monday, July 16, 2007 7:28 AM

All replies

  • Unfortunately, SteadyState could not be installed on Windows 2000 computer; meanwhile, there is no similar software that works on Windows 2000. To lock down a Windows 2000 computer, you may configure local group policy to configure restrictions. For example, to prevent users from running a specific application, you can configure the [User Configuration\Administrative Templates\System\Don't run specified Windows applications] group policy. Meanwhile, the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article is a good reference on how to lock down a computer although it is written for a terminal session. The underlying concept is similar.

     

    278295 How to Lock Down a Windows 2000 Terminal Server Session

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=278295

     

    With the following settings, even the administrator account will have restricted access. To prevent administrator from applying these policies, please refer to the following Microsoft Knowlede Base article:

     

    325351 HOW TO: Apply Local Policies to All Users Except Administrators on

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=325351

    Monday, July 16, 2007 7:28 AM
  • There are a number of extremely simple, cheap yet incredibly powerful hardware protection systems you can use with Windows 2000 (and every other OS). These are doing in hardware exactly what the original SCT v1 did in software. No software is required to be installed, no config changes, and Win2000 is never aware of its existence.

     

    They are just little plug in PCI cards which you add to your system, allocate a spare disk area, and swapfile partition - exactly in the same way as SCT v1. They then give a completely invisible rollback (snapshot) level of protection.

     

    an example of a hardware solution which I have used for over 5 years now is:

     

    http://www.moonscape.no/com/teachers_smart_card.html 

     

    This can do way more than SCT - protect and restore the BIOS, prevent bootup if PC config changed, prevent bootup from anything except the hdd, prevent bootup if the card is not present, multi OS bootup, WOL, remote boot, reset, update etc.

     

    Hope this is useful.

     

    Cheers

    Steve

     

     

     

    Saturday, July 21, 2007 8:26 PM
  • Be very careful with those hardware-based solutions similiar to Windows Disk Protection. I bought two versions of those on ebay with origin China (they are quite cheap) but found them to be not suitable. Although some even claim unlimited buffer, it seemed that the buffer was filled too fast. So i suffered from sudden reboots after one or more hours. Maybe someone had similiar experience? I would go for Deep Freeze by Faronics in your case.
    Sunday, July 22, 2007 10:33 PM
  • That a very sweeping generalisation ("be very careful with those hardware-based solutions") based on a random ebay purchase of two clone chinese import cards without any investigation! Do you warn everyone with such vigour whenever you buy a cheap Chinese clone product which doesn't work? "Stay away from those Ferraris, I bought a Chinese clone of one on ebay and it didn't work - so Ferraris are rubbish"

     

    I would suggest you actually try out several cards from reputable suppliers, in my experience most will send out a unit (it's hardware, so you can't copy it!). Over the years I've deployed several hundred of the moonscape cards I mentioned - into Schools, libraries, internet cafes, and locked down PC's - supplied via my local dealer, and not a single one has had an issue. The original versions had a 1GB rollback buffer - which never got anywhere close to becoming full in the environments I deployed them into (reset data on every reboot) - the latest ones have 10GB. I've tried them them with nearly every PC OS I could get my hands on, and with the exception of Vista it protected them 100% out of the box. I believe they are currently working on a firmware upgrade for Vista.

     

    On the flip side, I've seen numerous problems with software like deepfreeze, (such as not working with SATA drives, not enabling various DirectX games to work, conflicting with AV software & anti-hack utils, standby/hibernate issues etc) - and oh - it's $400 for a standard server 1 year agreement. Nice. And it's got quite an active hacker group constantly bypassing its protection. http://www.unfreezer.cjb.net/

     

    My advice - always thoroughly research any hardware or software solution, get a demo/trial, source it from a reputable dealer, and trawl the forums for current issues others are having.

     

     

     

    Monday, July 23, 2007 8:27 AM
  • Thanks for this insightful post. Actually i should not generalise my experience with those import cards. Maybe those cards even work good enough when doing reboots after each logout.
    About deep freeze: The deep freeze unfreezer is not a huge problem any more in my humble opinion as this software does not work with the latest versions. I assume that also those hardware based cards can be hacked (some cards manufacturers provide antihack programs/drivers to prevent hacking those cards).
    I always do thorough research but in this case i skipped thorough testing before buying in larger quantities. And i could not find any serious posting in any forum about such cards, you are the first one i meet that has experience with such cards Smile

     
    Thanks, Martin
    Monday, July 23, 2007 10:36 AM