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apply once and do not reapply

    Question

  • Hi,

    I have a question about:

    apply once and do not reapply option.

    Let say I set the option for Preferences GPO for inserting new Registry Key.

    If the option applied, would it:

    1. Create new registry Key on the target machine (my test shows it successfully does) and on next GPO verification will just not touch the entry (not reapply/override)

    2. Or GPO just will not be applied applied at all - any bit will not send to the target machine that has the required entry.

    Thx.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Tuesday, February 02, 2016 1:57 PM

Answers

  • > 1. Create new registry Key on the target machine (my test shows it
    > successfully does) and on next GPO verification will just not touch the
    > entry (not reapply/override)
     
    Yes.
     
    > 2. Or GPO just will not be applied applied at all - any bit will not
    > send to the target machine that has the required entry.
     
    No.
     
    In short: Each Item in GPP gets a GUID assigned. If you enable "apply
    once", this GUID is stored locally, and upon next policy cycle, the
    stored GUIDs are compared to the current item GUIDs in all GPOs.
     
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, February 03, 2016 1:57 PM
    Tuesday, February 02, 2016 3:41 PM
  • > 1. apply once and do not reapply is set. on next cycle it will not be
    > applied.
    > "the stored GUIDs are compared to the current item GUIDs in all GPOs"
    > is there actual gain on network bandwidth and computer processing vs not
    > using APPLY ONCE?
     
    No. GPP always reads the full XML file from sysvol. Unless you enable
    http://gpsearch.azurewebsites.net/#4853 (and for all other GPP too) and
    disable "process without changes".
     
    > 2. what "Remove this item when it is no longer applied" does in real
    > life when "Apply once..." is set?
     
    It will remove the item if you delete it from your GPO or if the GPO
    falls out of scope (isn't applied anymore).
     
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, February 03, 2016 1:57 PM
    Wednesday, February 03, 2016 10:56 AM

All replies

  • > 1. Create new registry Key on the target machine (my test shows it
    > successfully does) and on next GPO verification will just not touch the
    > entry (not reapply/override)
     
    Yes.
     
    > 2. Or GPO just will not be applied applied at all - any bit will not
    > send to the target machine that has the required entry.
     
    No.
     
    In short: Each Item in GPP gets a GUID assigned. If you enable "apply
    once", this GUID is stored locally, and upon next policy cycle, the
    stored GUIDs are compared to the current item GUIDs in all GPOs.
     
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, February 03, 2016 1:57 PM
    Tuesday, February 02, 2016 3:41 PM
  • so, next question :)

    1. apply once and do not reapply is set. on next cycle it will not be applied.

    "the stored GUIDs are compared to the current item GUIDs in all GPOs"

    is there actual gain on network bandwidth and computer processing vs not using APPLY ONCE?

    2. what "Remove this item when it is no longer applied" does in real life when "Apply once..." is set?

    Thanks.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Tuesday, February 02, 2016 5:02 PM
  • > 1. apply once and do not reapply is set. on next cycle it will not be
    > applied.
    > "the stored GUIDs are compared to the current item GUIDs in all GPOs"
    > is there actual gain on network bandwidth and computer processing vs not
    > using APPLY ONCE?
     
    No. GPP always reads the full XML file from sysvol. Unless you enable
    http://gpsearch.azurewebsites.net/#4853 (and for all other GPP too) and
    disable "process without changes".
     
    > 2. what "Remove this item when it is no longer applied" does in real
    > life when "Apply once..." is set?
     
    It will remove the item if you delete it from your GPO or if the GPO
    falls out of scope (isn't applied anymore).
     
    • Marked as answer by pob579 Wednesday, February 03, 2016 1:57 PM
    Wednesday, February 03, 2016 10:56 AM
  • Thanks for the exhaustive :) explanation.

    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis


    • Edited by pob579 Wednesday, February 03, 2016 12:46 PM
    Wednesday, February 03, 2016 12:46 PM