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Paging File RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    I search a best practice to "page files", i have many Windows 7 Pro 64 Bits with one physical disk.

    What is a best, create one partion (C:) install Windows 7 and paging files set "System managed" OR create C: and D: drive and install Windows 7 on drive C: and set a paging files on drive D: (for a fragmentation)?

    I search Microsoft article to confirm a best practice?

    Thanks

    Tuesday, December 20, 2011 2:19 PM

Answers

All replies

  • unless driver D is a separate hard drive and not just a partition there is
    no advantage in making a partition the page file.
     
    --
     
    mikeyshd
       "PO44" wrote in message
    news:907ba1c5-d9d3-43b1-9076-5fefee620140@communitybridge.codeplex.com...
    > Hi
    >
    > I search a best practice to "page files", i have many Windows 7 Pro 64
    > Bits with one physical disk.
    >
    > What is a best, create one partion (C:) install Windows 7 and paging files
    > set "System managed" OR create C: and D: drive and install Windows 7 on
    > drive C: and set a paging files on drive D: (for a fragmentation)?
    >
    > I search Microsoft article to confirm a best practice?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
     
    Tuesday, December 20, 2011 11:28 PM
  • I think this KB may help you: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2021748

    Regards,

    Miya

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tnmff@microsoft.com


    Miya Yao

    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Miya Yao Wednesday, December 28, 2011 7:12 AM
    Wednesday, December 21, 2011 7:37 AM
  • How's it going?

    Please feel free to give us any update.

    Regards,

    Miya


    Miya Yao

    TechNet Community Support

    Friday, December 23, 2011 7:17 AM
  • You don't really need a paging file at all unless you're running out of memory.  The other reason would be for a crash dump, but that only requires a couple hundred megs for kernel memory.  One thing you can try is to set the size range from 16 mb to 1000 mb, and see how much it grows.

     

    Friday, December 23, 2011 4:01 PM
  • You don't really need a paging file at all unless you're running out of memory.  The other reason would be for a crash dump, but that only requires a couple hundred megs for kernel memory.  One thing you can try is to set the size range from 16 mb to 1000 mb, and see how much it grows.

     

    That is not true, and I strongly recommend that anyone reading this thread should not follow this.

    My best suggestion is this: leave the page file alone, unless you're trying to fix a very specific problem that you somehow know is related to the page file.

    Suggested reading (not for the faint of heart): http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/2008/07/21/3092070.aspx


    If this post was helpful, please click the little "Vote as Helpful" button :)

    Trevor Sullivan
    Trevor Sullivan's Tech Room
    Twitter Profile
    Friday, December 23, 2011 5:26 PM
  • Even Mark makes fun of the way Windows sizes the page file by default.  Look for 'How big should I make the paging file?'

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/2008/11/17/3155406.aspx

    Although he does say a small page file is good for some os operations.  But his basic point is that ram + page file = as much memory as you actually need.

     

    • Marked as answer by Miya Yao Wednesday, December 28, 2011 7:12 AM
    Friday, December 23, 2011 6:11 PM