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Force an Update of a WSUS Client via command line RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello People,

     

    My Company issues netbooks to our field based engineers which need to remain up to date with Windows Patches/AV etc. The Windows patches are set to automatically download and install via WSUS.

     

    The clients are offline for long period of time (usually a week or more) and when the engineers connect the devices to our network they are invariably not online long enough for WSUS to download outstanding updates.

     

    As part of their work instructions they are supposed to run a batch file when they connect to the network to 'Check for Updates'. This batch checks various files on a share and downloads the latest copies the the local drive, does a GPupdate, writes a logfile etc.

     

    What i want to know, please, is if there is a command i can put in to this batch file that will force the device to check for outstanding updates so that they install when the user shuts down the device?

     

    Server is 2008 R2 with WSUS version is 3.2.7600.226

    Clients are Windows 7 Ultimate.

     

    Any help/advise greatly appreciated.

     

    Thanks,

    Tom

    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 8:58 AM

Answers

  • HI ,

    Use  command wuauclt /detectnow in client command line to detect the updates.

    Use wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow , this will flush the pending events and detect the updates available from WSUS

    Hope this is helpful.


    Mallikarjuna YH, Windows / Exchange

    To encourage me, vote as helpful if it really does.
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 10:49 AM
  • when the engineers connect the devices to our network they are invariably not online long enough for WSUS to download outstanding updates.

    To be frank, this suggests that these systems are not appropriate candidates for management via WSUS. They should be configured as Automatic Updates clients.

    As part of their work instructions they are supposed to run a batch file when they connect to the network to 'Check for Updates'. This batch checks various files on a share and downloads the latest copies the the local drive, does a GPupdate, writes a logfile etc.

    Seriously!? They're not online long enough for WSUS to download updates, but they are online long enough to run this script and wait for the file transfers?

    Wouldn't it just be easier to instruct them to launch the Windows Update applet and click on "Check for updates"? Of course, if they're not connected long enough, then they're not connected long enough and nothing else really matters.

    What i want to know, please, is if there is a command i can put in to this batch file that will force the device to check for outstanding updates so that they install when the user shuts down the device?

    Actually.... installing at shutdown is the *default* behavior of every Windows operating system since Windows XP SP2 -- but it does require that first the updates are *downloaded* before the system is powered down.

    The command is the basic command: wuauclt /detectnow -- as Mallikarjuna notes -- but if the system isn't connected long enough to download the updates, it won't matter a bit, the updates can't be installed.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2012)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin

    Thursday, November 29, 2012 4:19 AM

All replies

  • HI ,

    Use  command wuauclt /detectnow in client command line to detect the updates.

    Use wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow , this will flush the pending events and detect the updates available from WSUS

    Hope this is helpful.


    Mallikarjuna YH, Windows / Exchange

    To encourage me, vote as helpful if it really does.
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 10:49 AM
  • Use wuauclt /resetauthorization /detectnow , this will flush the pending events

    No. It won't.

    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2012)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin

    • Proposed as answer by MauLeoC Wednesday, September 27, 2017 4:23 PM
    Thursday, November 29, 2012 4:13 AM
  • when the engineers connect the devices to our network they are invariably not online long enough for WSUS to download outstanding updates.

    To be frank, this suggests that these systems are not appropriate candidates for management via WSUS. They should be configured as Automatic Updates clients.

    As part of their work instructions they are supposed to run a batch file when they connect to the network to 'Check for Updates'. This batch checks various files on a share and downloads the latest copies the the local drive, does a GPupdate, writes a logfile etc.

    Seriously!? They're not online long enough for WSUS to download updates, but they are online long enough to run this script and wait for the file transfers?

    Wouldn't it just be easier to instruct them to launch the Windows Update applet and click on "Check for updates"? Of course, if they're not connected long enough, then they're not connected long enough and nothing else really matters.

    What i want to know, please, is if there is a command i can put in to this batch file that will force the device to check for outstanding updates so that they install when the user shuts down the device?

    Actually.... installing at shutdown is the *default* behavior of every Windows operating system since Windows XP SP2 -- but it does require that first the updates are *downloaded* before the system is powered down.

    The command is the basic command: wuauclt /detectnow -- as Mallikarjuna notes -- but if the system isn't connected long enough to download the updates, it won't matter a bit, the updates can't be installed.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2012)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin

    Thursday, November 29, 2012 4:19 AM