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IE 10 times out after about 10 seconds and displays a "This page cannot be displayed" message RRS feed

  • Question

  • Every since I installed Windows 8 and IE 10 in December of 2012, I have noticed that IE seems to time out fairly quickly and returns a  "This page cannot be displayed" message.  This appears to happen after about 10 seconds if a website does not render in that amount of time.

    We have a website with a considerable amount of content and during busy periods it is not uncommon for a page to require a little more time to render. When I go to pages in FireFox or Chrome, the loading indicator keeps spinning indicating that the page is still downloading and often times the download completes as desired. 

    However, in IE 10 when the "This page cannot be displayed" message appears so soon, it gives customers the impression that our website is down or not functional.

    I would prefer that IE 10 show a progress indicator for more than 10 seconds before deciding that the page is not available and if the download time is longer then let the customer decide when they want to abort the download.  I think that as long as the progress indicator is running, most people are willing to wait a little longer than 10 seconds for a page to render.

    Having IE 10 make the decision that 10 seconds is too long is very frustrating because it leads to customers getting the impression that our website is not working when in fact it is.

    We are not able to control customers choice of browsers and IE is still the leading browser people use when visiting our website.  However, IE 9 under Windows 7 is still the primary browser accessing our website and IE 9 does not appear to have this "cut off" feature set to 10 seconds.


    Gary Frickey

    Thursday, June 27, 2013 4:14 PM

Answers

  • I would prefer that IE 10 show a progress indicator for more than 10 seconds before deciding that the page is not available and if the download time is longer then let the customer decide when they want to abort the download. 

    Check your assumptions.  E.g. I think that this could be explained by having a too short ReceiveTimeout.  Ref.  KB181050

    However, IE 9 under Windows 7 is still the primary browser accessing our website and IE 9 does not appear to have this "cut off" feature set to 10 seconds.

    Then I guess you would have to compare the registry value involved in each case.  ; )

    Otherwise, take traces of each and compare them.  E.g. at least use the Developer Tools, Network Capture and compare the timings for each.  Even better would be to use ProcMon to supplement whatever other diagnostics you have for each and see how the production of each diagnostic is preceded by file and registry accesses.  So if those were significantly different you might have some useful clues that way.

     
    Good luck

     



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Thursday, July 4, 2013 3:57 AM
    Answerer

All replies


  • Hi,

    I would like to suggest the following:

    1. Check if it works in No Add-ons mode.

    2. Please check if it is a proxy issue:

    Internet Explorer "Page Cannot be Displayed" error due to Bad Proxy Server Timeout
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2551554

    In addition, please check the issue referring to the following KB article:

    "Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage" error
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/956196

    Thanks.


    Nicholas Li
    TechNet Community Support

    Monday, July 1, 2013 9:52 AM
    Moderator
  • I looked at both of the kb articles you referenced.  In the first one, 2551554, I ran the "Fix It" program and it gave me a message saying that the fix didn't apply to my system.

    In the second one, the description of the problem is that you cannot view "ANY" website and this is not an accurate description of my problem either.  I can view any website as long as it renders in 10 seconds or less.  Often time, when I get the error saying "Page cannot be displayed" I will do a browser refresh and be able to see the page.

    I don't want to disable Ad-Ons because I am running Norton Internet security and I use it for remembering all of my various logins. Norton Internet security is running in all my browsers, IE, Chrome and FireFox and I don't get the "Page cannot be displayed" error in either Chrome of FireFox so I don't think that Norton is causing the problem. 

    I regularly clear out my browser cache and history and this has no effect on the problem.

    I was running Norton Internet security in Windows 7 and IE 9 and did not have this issue.  I only started getting this problem after upgrading to Windows 8 and IE 10 in December of 2012.

    I looked at the settings in IE 10 and did not see an option to "disable ad-ons"  I see the manage Add-ons option and I have many different ad-ons enabled.  Is there a way to temporarily turn off all ad-ons so that I can run the test you suggest?  I don't want to have to manually disable each individual ad-on and then have to go back an manually enable each one individually.

    Thanks,
    Gary


    Gary Frickey

    Tuesday, July 2, 2013 8:17 PM
  • You need to update where ever your website is hosted to be able to support IE10. If it is an external datawharehouse or webserver than theirs are not up to date currently.
    Tuesday, July 2, 2013 8:45 PM
  • Our website is running on Windows Server 2008/ IIS 7 at a hosting company.  It doesn't make sense that we have to change something on the server side so that IE 10 works for customers.  I have never heard of anything like that before.

    Gary Frickey

    Wednesday, July 3, 2013 10:37 PM
  • I would prefer that IE 10 show a progress indicator for more than 10 seconds before deciding that the page is not available and if the download time is longer then let the customer decide when they want to abort the download. 

    Check your assumptions.  E.g. I think that this could be explained by having a too short ReceiveTimeout.  Ref.  KB181050

    However, IE 9 under Windows 7 is still the primary browser accessing our website and IE 9 does not appear to have this "cut off" feature set to 10 seconds.

    Then I guess you would have to compare the registry value involved in each case.  ; )

    Otherwise, take traces of each and compare them.  E.g. at least use the Developer Tools, Network Capture and compare the timings for each.  Even better would be to use ProcMon to supplement whatever other diagnostics you have for each and see how the production of each diagnostic is preceded by file and registry accesses.  So if those were significantly different you might have some useful clues that way.

     
    Good luck

     



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Thursday, July 4, 2013 3:57 AM
    Answerer
  • Hi Robert,

    The KB article you referenced does not really apply.  I am not getting a "connection timed out" error message.  I just get a "page cannot be displayed" message.  This message seems to get returned for any web page that takes more than 10 seconds (my estimate), to render.  Also the KB article doesn't seem to apply to IE 10 anyway.

    All I am trying to find out is why the base version of IE 10 that I am running doesn't seem to allow enough time before stopping the process and displaying the "page cannot be displayed" message.

    I will try to use the Network Capture tool like you suggested to see if that will tell me anything.

    Thanks,
    Gary


    Gary Frickey

    Monday, July 8, 2013 4:15 PM
  • I am still experiencing this problem on a daily basis.  I called Microsoft Support a couple of months ago and they asked me to reset my IE settings to the defaults and that did not make any difference.  I am hoping that IE 11 might resolve this issue.  My primary concern is that other IE users are getting this same message when visiting out website and will interpret it to be a problem with our site rather than with IE.

    Thanks,
    Gary


    Gary Frickey

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 4:17 PM
  • I will try to use the Network Capture tool like you suggested to see if that will tell me anything.

    Did it?  <eg>

    What about ProcMon or NetMon?

    I doubt that this is an IE thing.  I suspect a networking factor.  So all that RIES would do is establish a baseline for subsequent diagnosis.

     
    HTH



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 10:55 PM
    Answerer
  • The reason I think it is an IE thing is that I try multiple browsers doing the same task and they never give me any time out or page cannot be displayed message.  Most times, when I see the problem in IE, I do a refresh and then the page will render properly...it just seems that there is about a 10 second limit somewhere in IE that if a page takes longer than 10 seconds to render, I get the "Page Can't Be Displayed" error.

    Gary Frickey

    Thursday, September 12, 2013 12:01 AM
  • Most times, when I see the problem in IE, I do a refresh and then the page will render properly...it just seems that there is about a 10 second limit somewhere in IE that if a page takes longer than 10 seconds to render, I get the "Page Can't Be Displayed" error.

    Or somewhere else in the process there are even shorter timeout windows which get exceeded (especially in the DNS lookup phase) but by being attempted they sort of "prime the pump" and thus reduce the probability of them being exceeded again on a retry?   Also, consider that early on in IE4 and W9X there was a misguided feature called AutoScan which would have required such short timeouts, so I wouldn't be surprised to find that residue effects from that implementation are still present in both IE and the OS.

    And, in order to try to explain why other browsers don't always see these excessions, perhaps they have been optimized to avoid them?  In fact, I'm not sure whether other browsers even use the same implementation, e.g. they might be doing their own DNS lookups, bypassing the dnscache, and thus avoiding them without even being aware of them.   Etc.

    I still think the thing to do is test our assumptions with tracing and analysis.



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:39 PM
    Answerer
  • I just had a very similar problem and was able to address it by going into the registry and deleting the ReceiveTimeout
    value at HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings, as suggested by this page: http://intersoftpt.wordpress.com/2009/06/23/resolve-page-cannot-be-displayed-issue-in-ie8/
    • Proposed as answer by PeterDur Saturday, August 23, 2014 8:59 AM
    Saturday, August 23, 2014 8:58 AM
  • deleting the ReceiveTimeout value

    10 seconds (10,000 milleseconds)?  Is that what you had there too?  Do you know why?  Notice that the OP rejected this idea earlier when I suggested it.

    Mine is 8 minutes as described here:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/181050/en-us

    but this has nothing to do with DNS lookup failure which is where I think the problem symptom probably originates.



    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Saturday, August 23, 2014 2:22 PM
    Answerer