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Windows 7 Final Release RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is there any certainty that Microsoft will release Advanced Beta versions or Final Release Candidates before the expiration of the current Windows 7 beta?

    Microsoft encourages its participants to install the OS on a computer dedicated to the Windows7 OS, or at least a separate HD with completely separate data files from previous Windows versions.

    If I go to the trouble of doing some serious experimentation, installing applications and accumulating data, is there any assurance that the resultant data files can either be transported back to a previous version of Windows or that an Advanced Beta version of Windows 7 or Final Release Candidates will be available to utilize the data accumulated as a result of using Windows 7 Beta?

    Using a dedicated computer to install games just to see if they work seems like a waste of resources, but I'd hate to spend six months accumulating a large amount of data, only to have it rendered useless in the future.

    Anyone have any information regarding future releases of Windows7? Any MS Reps reading this?

     
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 12:50 PM

Answers

All replies

  • davidpsr

    For what it's worth.. There are very few things that guarantee a 100% certainty... Death and Taxes are generally the two most accepted ones.

    That being said, there's an excellent chance that Microsoft WILL release the Release Candidate sometime before the drop dead date of August 1st.

    Secondly... Should you not install a newer version of Win 7 before Aug 1st, and it does drop dead, you can still access the data on the hard drive from another drive with a different OS on it.

    Third, the data files you create under Win 7 should be able to be read on Win XP or Vista boxes - provided you've got at least the same version (or newer) of the app installed. Windows 7 doesn't create much in the way of content that can't be read on another machine.

    If you install Win 7 in a dual boot scenario, you should be able to access everything on the Win 7 partition without any problems.
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 1:37 PM
  • I think another beta (Possibly RC) will be released before the expiration of this current beta.

    As for data yo have amassed, you have obviously installed Windows 7 to another partition or, as i have done, to another hard drive. If the current beta comes to an end without the release of another build you would be able to access the data on your Windows 7 partition/hard drive from either Windows Vista or Windows XP. It maybe necessary for you to take ownership of the files on the Windows 7 partition/drive to gain access if the beta is no longer running but that isn't particularly a major issue.
    John Barnett - Windows XP Associate Expert; Windows Desktop Experience. - Web: http://www.winuser.co.uk; Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org; Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 2:12 PM
    Answerer
  • Although I can't find the link right now, I beleive that Microsoft has publicly stated that there will be a single beta and a release candidate for Windows 7 (at least, that's the view promoted by prominant Windows journalists like Paul Thurrott).

    I would be very surprised if that release candidate did not support an upgrade from the current beta (note that it has not been referred to as beta 1) and if if was not shipped before the August expiry date.  If it were to slip, then I'd expect a patch to increase the expiry date.

    Finally, as previous commenters have noted, you can access your files and data on the disk from another operating system.
    Mark Wilson (MVP Virtual Machine) - http://www.markwilson.co.uk/blog/
    Tuesday, February 24, 2009 5:11 PM
    Answerer
  • @davidpsr

    I don’t mean to be blunt, but then you should not have installed the beta.  Microsoft made it very clear that this build will expire on Aug 1, 2009.  Likewise, they made no mention, much less any promise, that they would release later builds to the public.

     

    If you believe that all of this was a waste of time, then you signed up for the wrong thing.

     

    In either case, you should be able to migrate and transfer all of your data back to your production OS if and when the time arises.

     

     

    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 5:11 AM
  •    

    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 6:27 AM
  •  Let's just hope that a new test build or RC will be released soon. It has been more than a month since build 7000. How will we know the status of our feedback or bug submissions if they have been fixed or not if there's no update coming in a month. (or weeks)
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 7:26 AM
  • Chino Yray said:

     Let's just hope that a new test build or RC will be released soon. It has been more than a month since build 7000. How will we know the status of our feedback or bug submissions if they have been fixed or not if there's no update coming in a month. (or weeks)



    There won't be one for a a while. What's the rush? Win 7 isn't supposed to be released until next January.
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:04 PM
  • Since Microsoft is asking its customers to dedicate a computer to trying their latest OS, while offering nothing in return, I think that simply as good business practice they'd offer BETA participants (with some degree of certainty) the ability to continue using the OS after it evolves either to a new Beta version, an RC release, or a final version. IMHO, they're asking an awful lot of their customers (to dedicate an entire computer to testing their software), while promising nothing.

    As it relates to Microsoft's terms of service agreement for BETA products, yes I knew going in that it asks for a lot from the customer (a dedicated computer to test their software) and promises nothing in return. Maybe that's why every Microsoft OS release to date has been filled with bugs, required hundreds of patches, one or more complete service releases, and in the case of VISTA, almost a complete overhaul. With software testers as with everything else, you get what you pay for.
    Remember when experts debated whether Commodore or Apple would win the race for dominance in PC format?
    Monday, May 25, 2009 5:31 PM
  • Actually David 'you' and you alone decide whether to install Windows 7 on your system. Microsoft are simply giving you the opportunity to use the product prior to any official release. No one twists your arm to spend time using it and, for that matter, Microsoft don't even have to provide any of us, either public beta tester or us technical beta testers with the product. As for giving a 'free' copy to all beta testers - well the understanding is that all beta testers, technical or otherwise, beta test for free. This has always been the understanding with beta software. You only have to consider the cost of such an operation; with Millions of public testers as well as thousands of techncial testers just imagine how much that would cost Microsoft. Once you have considered the cost you have to think 'who' is going to pay for it. The answer is simply the buying public in the form of an increased price of the software. That, in return, has a knock on effect because the consumer will say, 'sorry i'm not paying that' and the end result is lower sales than Microsoft expect and less money to spent of research and development of the next version of Windows.

    John Barnett MVP: Windows XP Associate Expert: Windows Desktop Experience: Web: http://www.winuser.co.uk; Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org; Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org;
    Monday, May 25, 2009 6:42 PM
    Answerer
  • ...as with everything else, you get what you pay for.
    Very true, and this includes backup solutions. Speaking to anyone with a computer: If any single event can destroy your data then your data wasn't important to you. Luckily, Microsoft provides clear warnings about safeguarding it while using their beta OS. Personally, my data is RAID 1 locally, backed up via Carbonite, and I also have a set of data DVDs at the office. We all have horror stories and my brother-in-law's girlfriend recently moved (not copied) all her digital photos to an external harddrive and it failed.

    I'm curious about your comments regarding Microsoft's beta strategy in regard to the quality of their products. I honestly am not aware of a beta program that produces an OS that is bug-free and doesn't need patching. (Sorry, I'm not sure about the meaning of the overhaul comment).
    Monday, May 25, 2009 6:57 PM

  • ...how much that would cost Microsoft...and less money to spent of research and development




    Within reason, I follow your point John.  But to put it in balanced perspective, we might also mention the other side of the coin.

    Monday, May 25, 2009 7:00 PM
  • Within reason, I follow your point John.  But to put it in balanced perspective, we might also mention the other side of the coin.


    I disagree that when Microsoft achieves a certain level of sucess they should give their products away to people who download a beta. Instead Microsoft has a strong history of charitable giving (US$432 million in 2008).
    http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2008/12/microsofts-2008-donations-almost-500-million.ars
    Monday, May 25, 2009 8:36 PM
  • Within reason, I follow your point John.  But to put it in balanced perspective, we might also mention the other side of the coin.


    I disagree that when Microsoft achieves a certain level of sucess they should give their products away to people who download a beta. Instead Microsoft has a strong history of charitable giving (US$432 million in 2008).
    http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2008/12/microsofts-2008-donations-almost-500-million.ars


    Please don't distort my words.  I merely said balanced perspective.

    Compare their profits to their R&D.  Ask also just exactly who is getting paid from that enormous SGA (executive+payroll) number.  Then consider how much of a dent they'd suffer by giving some free-for-testing software to an upgrade market that historically hasn't been a significant source of revenue.




    Regarding that altruistic act you mention, you know charitable contributions are a tax write-off.

    And to put that in balanced perspective, it was less than 1% of their Gross.

    Monday, May 25, 2009 8:52 PM
  • Then consider how much of a dent they'd suffer by giving some free-for-testing software...
    We can't estimate without reasonable estimates, but even at upgrade licensing 2.5 million seats (orginal beta limit before being lifted) is a dent. It's OK we don't agree on this.
    Monday, May 25, 2009 10:13 PM

  • but even at upgrade licensing 2.5 million seats (orginal beta limit before being lifted) is a dent. It's OK we don't agree on this.



    What makes you think there'd be 2.5 million upgraders?

    Yes, I read there were 2.8 million unique IDs.  How does that translate to paying upgraders?


    But since you pushed the issue, let's have at it.  John suggested that lost revenues would decrease R&D expenditures.  You piled onto that heap with reference to Microsoft's altruistic charitable write-offs.  Yes, I agree with both of you on that point.  If Microsoft's revenues decrease, then R&D will likely suffer.  So will the general payroll portion of their colossal  SG&A (executive+payroll)  figure.

    But I disagree that the executive compensation would suffer.  And I disagree that free-for-testing software would be the cause.


    There.  You wanted blunt?  You got it.

    Monday, May 25, 2009 10:55 PM
  • Then consider how much of a dent they'd suffer by giving some free-for-testing software...
    We can't estimate without reasonable estimates, but even at upgrade licensing 2.5 million seats (orginal beta limit before being lifted) is a dent. It's OK we don't agree on this.

    PNutts -

    Dude... You're wasting your time trying to argue with him. Already had pretty much the same "discussion" with him last week. He's pretty much set in his thinking and isn't likely to budge. Arguing with a brick wall might produce more tangible results...
    Monday, May 25, 2009 11:12 PM
  • egads -

    I'm NOT about to waste my time with you any more. I'm NOT embarassed. It's as legitimate number as a possibility as your 28,000. You're unwilling to see my points. I'm unwilling to concede mine. I'm merely pointing out to PNutts the futility of the exercise.

    Discussion = over.
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 12:38 AM