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How to resolve port numbers in SharePoint (and DNS)? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am running SharePoint 2007 (trial) on a Win2K3 EE x64 server. I notice that when I create a SharePoint Web Portal (Top level site, I think it is called) that the portal is created using a port number. Obviously, DNS cannot resolve port numbers. I need to request of our IT overlords a DNS entry and CNAME. So for example, if I request a DNS entry of x.machinename.local point to X.X.X.X and a CNAME entry of test.machinename.local point to x.machinename.local how do I resolve this so that I end up at test:44692 inside SharePoint? Would this be done in AAM or IIS?

    Thanks!

    Doug



    • Edited by Mike Walsh FIN Monday, April 4, 2011 7:32 PM P in SharePoint
    Monday, April 4, 2011 5:16 PM

Answers

  • Tthe user would need to put in the port number manually.

     

    However, SharePoint Web Applications can also be created on port 80 with a custom Host Header.  simply enter the DNS entry you would like the site to use as the host header and users will be able to go to the site based on that entry in DNS.  so you could have x.machinename.local and y.machinename.local going to two different web sites, but both resolving to the same IP address in DNS.  Just have IT create two DNS entries.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    • Marked as answer by Leoyi Sun Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:59 AM
    Monday, April 4, 2011 5:43 PM
  • An alternate access mapping (AAM) is the mechanism that SharePoint uses to keep track of different Urls that are applied to the same web site or web sites that share the same content.  In IIS you can bind a web site to multiple host headers.  If you do you would need multiple AAMs so that SharePoint recognized all the URLs.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    • Marked as answer by Leoyi Sun Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:59 AM
    Tuesday, April 5, 2011 1:20 PM

All replies

  • Tthe user would need to put in the port number manually.

     

    However, SharePoint Web Applications can also be created on port 80 with a custom Host Header.  simply enter the DNS entry you would like the site to use as the host header and users will be able to go to the site based on that entry in DNS.  so you could have x.machinename.local and y.machinename.local going to two different web sites, but both resolving to the same IP address in DNS.  Just have IT create two DNS entries.


    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    • Marked as answer by Leoyi Sun Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:59 AM
    Monday, April 4, 2011 5:43 PM
  • Cool, that makes sense and that request has been generated for the overlords to cogitate on.  So in the same vein, what exactly is AAM for then? i thit that process provided a way to cross reference between a SharePoint generate site name and a DNS entry?

     

    Thanks,

    Doug

    Monday, April 4, 2011 6:50 PM
  • An alternate access mapping (AAM) is the mechanism that SharePoint uses to keep track of different Urls that are applied to the same web site or web sites that share the same content.  In IIS you can bind a web site to multiple host headers.  If you do you would need multiple AAMs so that SharePoint recognized all the URLs.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    • Marked as answer by Leoyi Sun Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:59 AM
    Tuesday, April 5, 2011 1:20 PM