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How do I implement MOF? RRS feed

  • Question

  • M.....

    I have recently been assigned as Project Manager to the MOF Implementation project within our IT environment which is basically a Microsoft shop and we are doing in house development of applications for the legal profession (prosecutors).

    We are mostly (about 90 %) contractors working in a government IT department and as I mentioned above, I have now been tasked to Implement MOF within this environment.

    The environment is still very imature in the sense that apart from a helpdesk for desktop and network related issues as well as an implemented change management process most of the other processes or phases that makes up MOF is left to informal interpretation and mostly reactive  to things happening (fire fighting mode)

    Haven't said the above - do Microsoft have guidelines, job aids etc to assist one in implementing the MOF concept within such an environment .

    I basically don't want to reinvent the wheel on MOF and therefore would appreciate any guidelines, documentation , web links, etc in this regard

    Thanks
    Nico

    Friday, August 8, 2008 11:42 AM

Answers

  • Hi Louwng.

     

    I think that opportunity is very good for you, congratulations. In my opinion you have:

     

    1.    Read some MOF documents (at least Overviews) about MOF here http://forums.technet.microsoft.com/en-US/MOF4/thread/ab4cdac9-7cb4-4786-8159-4871f3f425f5


    2.   
    Contact a professional or consultant to help us understand and define step by step tasks to this

     

    Or if you want to make this in house read all documents about MOF 4.0 and do some internal alignment with a group to define how MOF adoption starts. But you have choice the better way for you J

     

    Hope that helps

    Good luck

     

    Cleber Marques

    MOF Brazil Project (Microsoft MVP - Most Valuable Professional)

    www.mof.com.br | www.clebermarques.com | www.clebermarques.com.br
    Tuesday, August 12, 2008 5:25 PM
    Moderator
  • I agree with DavidHS above--this community is here to help. 

    You don't mention where you are located, but I know that in the US, MOF is quickly gaining ground as governmental agencies are encouraging (and occasionally mandating) its adoption.

    Personally, my recommendation would be to start small, and out of the order that you would see in the core documents.  The normal tendency is to open a book, start at Chapter 1, and go on from there.  In the case of MOF, that might be fine if you were starting a new organization, but it would be quite difficult to do in an existing organization--especially one that you describe as "immature."  By starting with the "Manage" layer, you can implement some processes and controls into your existing operations that would be "comfortable" to start with.  The "Governance, Risk, and Compliance" SMF is critical, for instance--you MUST comply with appropriate legal regulations and so forth.  By using the GRC SMF, you'd merely be formalizing something that you are (hopefully!) already doing!

    The Change and Configuration SMF is also one that can be an easy "starting point" to ease into MOF use.  You probably have a change and configuration process of some sort already in place--by implementing the C&C SMF, you can encourage your shop to tighten up your configuration tracking and reduce downtime when changes must be made.

    One of the best parts of MOF is that you don't have to "flip the switch" on the whole thing at one time.  The parts work well together, but each can be used in a "stand-alone" mode as you grow your organization's commitment.

    I hope this helps, and I look forward to hearing some success stories from you soon!

    Ric Crouch
    Process Catalyst Solutions
    http://www.ProcessCatalyst.com

    Thursday, September 11, 2008 4:54 AM
  • Hi Nico,

    Lot's of good advice already provided so hopefully you already have ideas on how you want to start your project.

    To add to what has already been provided...my bit of advice is to go for a quick win to gain support and show some traction with the MOF implementation.

    You mentioned you already have a helpdesk and change management process in place. These are two areas where you might be able to grab the quick win and gain support from your customers and management.

    I would take a look at both the Service Desk and Change Management MOF material and to see which area you might be able to implement a small change to the existing function or service (helpdesk / Change Management).

    Help Desk

    Does your helpdesk currently take ownership of the incident when a customer calls in? Not that the helpdesk should solve all incidents but rather they would be the main communication point between your customers. To increase customer satisfaction maybe have the helpdesk start doing call backs to key customers after a service interruption been reported as resolved.

    Change Process
    Does your team hold PIR's (post implementation reviews) after major or significant changes are released into the environment? The PIR process can be used to confirm what that went well and what needs improvement. Your team can use this information keep doing the steps that you do well and prioritized the areas that need improvement.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Ed

    Tuesday, September 16, 2008 11:41 AM
  • Get the complete MOF 4 guide:
     http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=457ED61D-27B8-49D1-BACA-B175E8F54C0C&displaylang=en

    You may also want to pick up the MOF pocket guide, put it in your pocket and read it every chance you get. The key is to get the lifecycles into your head. THEN get the SMF's into your head. Once you get Plan, Deliver, Operate and Manage into your head with thier correlating SMF's(Service Management Functions - those thigs you do to make it work) it becomes portable and it begins to shape the way you think about everything you do in IT.

    Now for the important part - READ the complete MOF 4 guide FIRST! Understand how this all works together.

    I would also suggest that you get the MOF Job Aids:
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=B7FC1B86-8E3C-47DB-8121-03F41E7277AD&displaylang=en

    The MOF Job Aids include a guide for setting up MOF 4. It also includes a fictional company so that you can see the Outputs as they would likely exist. This also includes templates you can use for preparing all the steps, Service Level Agreements, Service Catalog, etc.

    BUT, you have got to get management behind you on this because it is going to be time consuming and that is an expenditure that you want everybody onboard with.
    Friday, November 7, 2008 6:42 PM

All replies

  • Hi Louwng.

     

    I think that opportunity is very good for you, congratulations. In my opinion you have:

     

    1.    Read some MOF documents (at least Overviews) about MOF here http://forums.technet.microsoft.com/en-US/MOF4/thread/ab4cdac9-7cb4-4786-8159-4871f3f425f5


    2.   
    Contact a professional or consultant to help us understand and define step by step tasks to this

     

    Or if you want to make this in house read all documents about MOF 4.0 and do some internal alignment with a group to define how MOF adoption starts. But you have choice the better way for you J

     

    Hope that helps

    Good luck

     

    Cleber Marques

    MOF Brazil Project (Microsoft MVP - Most Valuable Professional)

    www.mof.com.br | www.clebermarques.com | www.clebermarques.com.br
    Tuesday, August 12, 2008 5:25 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi

    I was wondering whether you had progressed any with this. If not I may be able to put you in touch with some people who can help in your region.

    Regards

    Dave
    Wednesday, September 10, 2008 10:31 AM
  • I agree with DavidHS above--this community is here to help. 

    You don't mention where you are located, but I know that in the US, MOF is quickly gaining ground as governmental agencies are encouraging (and occasionally mandating) its adoption.

    Personally, my recommendation would be to start small, and out of the order that you would see in the core documents.  The normal tendency is to open a book, start at Chapter 1, and go on from there.  In the case of MOF, that might be fine if you were starting a new organization, but it would be quite difficult to do in an existing organization--especially one that you describe as "immature."  By starting with the "Manage" layer, you can implement some processes and controls into your existing operations that would be "comfortable" to start with.  The "Governance, Risk, and Compliance" SMF is critical, for instance--you MUST comply with appropriate legal regulations and so forth.  By using the GRC SMF, you'd merely be formalizing something that you are (hopefully!) already doing!

    The Change and Configuration SMF is also one that can be an easy "starting point" to ease into MOF use.  You probably have a change and configuration process of some sort already in place--by implementing the C&C SMF, you can encourage your shop to tighten up your configuration tracking and reduce downtime when changes must be made.

    One of the best parts of MOF is that you don't have to "flip the switch" on the whole thing at one time.  The parts work well together, but each can be used in a "stand-alone" mode as you grow your organization's commitment.

    I hope this helps, and I look forward to hearing some success stories from you soon!

    Ric Crouch
    Process Catalyst Solutions
    http://www.ProcessCatalyst.com

    Thursday, September 11, 2008 4:54 AM
  • Hi Nico,

    Lot's of good advice already provided so hopefully you already have ideas on how you want to start your project.

    To add to what has already been provided...my bit of advice is to go for a quick win to gain support and show some traction with the MOF implementation.

    You mentioned you already have a helpdesk and change management process in place. These are two areas where you might be able to grab the quick win and gain support from your customers and management.

    I would take a look at both the Service Desk and Change Management MOF material and to see which area you might be able to implement a small change to the existing function or service (helpdesk / Change Management).

    Help Desk

    Does your helpdesk currently take ownership of the incident when a customer calls in? Not that the helpdesk should solve all incidents but rather they would be the main communication point between your customers. To increase customer satisfaction maybe have the helpdesk start doing call backs to key customers after a service interruption been reported as resolved.

    Change Process
    Does your team hold PIR's (post implementation reviews) after major or significant changes are released into the environment? The PIR process can be used to confirm what that went well and what needs improvement. Your team can use this information keep doing the steps that you do well and prioritized the areas that need improvement.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Ed

    Tuesday, September 16, 2008 11:41 AM
  • Get the complete MOF 4 guide:
     http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=457ED61D-27B8-49D1-BACA-B175E8F54C0C&displaylang=en

    You may also want to pick up the MOF pocket guide, put it in your pocket and read it every chance you get. The key is to get the lifecycles into your head. THEN get the SMF's into your head. Once you get Plan, Deliver, Operate and Manage into your head with thier correlating SMF's(Service Management Functions - those thigs you do to make it work) it becomes portable and it begins to shape the way you think about everything you do in IT.

    Now for the important part - READ the complete MOF 4 guide FIRST! Understand how this all works together.

    I would also suggest that you get the MOF Job Aids:
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=B7FC1B86-8E3C-47DB-8121-03F41E7277AD&displaylang=en

    The MOF Job Aids include a guide for setting up MOF 4. It also includes a fictional company so that you can see the Outputs as they would likely exist. This also includes templates you can use for preparing all the steps, Service Level Agreements, Service Catalog, etc.

    BUT, you have got to get management behind you on this because it is going to be time consuming and that is an expenditure that you want everybody onboard with.
    Friday, November 7, 2008 6:42 PM
  • RicCrouch said:

    I agree with DavidHS above--this community is here to help. 

    You don't mention where you are located, but I know that in the US, MOF is quickly gaining ground as governmental agencies are encouraging (and occasionally mandating) its adoption.



    I need to clarify... some governmental agencies are mandating that their contractors demonstrate maturity in their IT Service Management processes--not that MOF is specifically required. 

    Sorry for any confusion!

    Ric Crouch
    http://www.ProcessCatalyst.com
    Monday, November 24, 2008 11:10 PM
  • I’m marking this post as answered, if you need any help about MOF please open a new thread. J

    Thank you,

     

    Cleber Marques
    MOF Brazil Project: Simplifying IT Service Management
    www.mof.com.br | www.clebermarques.com | www.clebermarques.com.br

    Thursday, May 28, 2009 10:18 AM
    Moderator