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Normalization rule help RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am new, and to be honest terrible with normalization rules. I am trying to understand what I would need to create to not require a 1 in front of certain area codes that are local to our area. I would need to do a rule that would not require a 1 before dialing 480,602, and 623 area codes. Any help would be appreciated as i've tried to do them on my own to no avail.
    Friday, October 12, 2012 9:02 PM

Answers

  • Instead of trying to figure out normalization rules, why not try the Lync Dialing Rule Optimizer (shameless plug: http://lyncoptimizer.com).  All you need to do is plug in the area code and first 3 digits of your main office number and it will automatically create localized dialing rules for your specific area.  Try it out and let me know how it works for you.

    Ken Lasko

    http://ucken.blogspot.com

    • Proposed as answer by Adminiuga Sunday, October 14, 2012 3:12 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Friday, November 2, 2012 1:14 AM
    Saturday, October 13, 2012 2:52 PM
  • Hi,Phreakin

    Ken's Lync dialing rule optimizer is really a great tool for others who just need figure out how to create the Normalization rule,if you would like to understand the Normalization rule more thoroughly you can read through the following links

    http://theucguy.wordpress.com/2010/09/30/ocs-lync-server-normalization-rules/ 

    http://ucken.blogspot.com/2011/01/enterprise-voice-best-practices-in-lync.html 

    Hope these useful!

    Regards,

    Sharon


    Sharon Shen

    TechNet Community Support

    ************************************************************************************************************************

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question.

    • Marked as answer by Phreakin Monday, April 1, 2013 7:19 PM
    Monday, October 15, 2012 6:19 AM
  • I think you are mixing the general E.164 normalization requirements withing Lync and the local dialing requirement.

    In Lync, in a perfect world, every user would have DID and the number will be entered as E.164 (in US this is +1XXXYYYZZZZ). The dial plan normalization rules will capture the user's string and "convert" it to E.164 if a matching rule is found. For example - in our town, we dial 7 digits for local call. It has been this way for eons and  don't want to change the user habits. In this case, I will create rule to normalize 7 digits to E.164 as follow - "When 7 digits are dialed (local call), prepend +1 (beginning of US E.164 string) and 478 (the local area code). The final result will be +1478YYYZZZZ. Why is this necessary? My local users have DID's which always begins with +1478. The goal is to offer Lync a chance to understand the number, evaluate it and if match if found to route the call to the internal user and not send it to PSTN just to return to Lync environment for internal user. In any case, if your users are used to dial 10 digits for those three area codes, as Igor pointed, the 10digitcallingUS sample will do the job.

    Now, in your case you might have users who will have local number from the area codes you mention. You still want the the local user to be matched first if possible, and then route to PSTN.

    The second part is what to do with the call after it gets to stage to be routed to PSTN. Here we have Trunk translation rules. If your provider required 10 digits for those 3 area codes, the rule would be "If the number begins with +1480, remove +1, leave the rest and process further.

    I hope this helps you understand the subject.

    .

    Drago


    http://www.lynclog.com


    • Edited by Drago Totev Monday, October 15, 2012 1:09 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Friday, November 2, 2012 1:14 AM
    Monday, October 15, 2012 1:09 PM

All replies

  • This page has samples of the different rules:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg413082.aspx

    Check 10digitcallingUS sample.  This is what you want.

    Thank you.



    Please “Vote As Helpful” and/or “Mark As Answer” if this post helped you.

    Friday, October 12, 2012 10:28 PM
  • Instead of trying to figure out normalization rules, why not try the Lync Dialing Rule Optimizer (shameless plug: http://lyncoptimizer.com).  All you need to do is plug in the area code and first 3 digits of your main office number and it will automatically create localized dialing rules for your specific area.  Try it out and let me know how it works for you.

    Ken Lasko

    http://ucken.blogspot.com

    • Proposed as answer by Adminiuga Sunday, October 14, 2012 3:12 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Friday, November 2, 2012 1:14 AM
    Saturday, October 13, 2012 2:52 PM
  • Hi,Phreakin

    Ken's Lync dialing rule optimizer is really a great tool for others who just need figure out how to create the Normalization rule,if you would like to understand the Normalization rule more thoroughly you can read through the following links

    http://theucguy.wordpress.com/2010/09/30/ocs-lync-server-normalization-rules/ 

    http://ucken.blogspot.com/2011/01/enterprise-voice-best-practices-in-lync.html 

    Hope these useful!

    Regards,

    Sharon


    Sharon Shen

    TechNet Community Support

    ************************************************************************************************************************

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question.

    • Marked as answer by Phreakin Monday, April 1, 2013 7:19 PM
    Monday, October 15, 2012 6:19 AM
  • I think you are mixing the general E.164 normalization requirements withing Lync and the local dialing requirement.

    In Lync, in a perfect world, every user would have DID and the number will be entered as E.164 (in US this is +1XXXYYYZZZZ). The dial plan normalization rules will capture the user's string and "convert" it to E.164 if a matching rule is found. For example - in our town, we dial 7 digits for local call. It has been this way for eons and  don't want to change the user habits. In this case, I will create rule to normalize 7 digits to E.164 as follow - "When 7 digits are dialed (local call), prepend +1 (beginning of US E.164 string) and 478 (the local area code). The final result will be +1478YYYZZZZ. Why is this necessary? My local users have DID's which always begins with +1478. The goal is to offer Lync a chance to understand the number, evaluate it and if match if found to route the call to the internal user and not send it to PSTN just to return to Lync environment for internal user. In any case, if your users are used to dial 10 digits for those three area codes, as Igor pointed, the 10digitcallingUS sample will do the job.

    Now, in your case you might have users who will have local number from the area codes you mention. You still want the the local user to be matched first if possible, and then route to PSTN.

    The second part is what to do with the call after it gets to stage to be routed to PSTN. Here we have Trunk translation rules. If your provider required 10 digits for those 3 area codes, the rule would be "If the number begins with +1480, remove +1, leave the rest and process further.

    I hope this helps you understand the subject.

    .

    Drago


    http://www.lynclog.com


    • Edited by Drago Totev Monday, October 15, 2012 1:09 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Friday, November 2, 2012 1:14 AM
    Monday, October 15, 2012 1:09 PM