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Why does Windows 8 not automatically disable Superfetch on SSD? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello!

    Windows 7 used to disable Superfetch automatically if it detects a fast SSD as system drive. But Windows 8 doesn't. In this respect i found an interesting statement from Intel in the help section of the SSD Toolbox:

    "In Microsoft Windows 8, Superfetch functions differently than in previous versions of Windows, and should not be disabled for an Intel SSD."

    But i can't find any official statement or explanation from Microsoft for this topic.

    My questions: What is the difference between the Superfetch service in Windows 7 and the Superfetch service in Windows 8? What did MS changed? Why does it now make sense for a SSD?

    Monday, February 25, 2013 6:24 PM

Answers

  • ok, I got the mail from Gov and this is his reply
    Rather than disable the entire service, we leave it on, and dynamically ignore SSDs or SSD-like hardware (like SSDs in RAID).




    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    • Marked as answer by Toorch Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:24 PM
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 5:31 PM
    Answerer
  • Its Windows way of making things easier for users.  You will notice defrag is still enabled.....Windows knows which drives in your system are HDD and SSD (by querying rotational speed and getting back 0 for SSD) and thus does not defrag SSDs.  The option is enabled but ignored for SSDS.  Same thing for Superfetch, the option is enabled but not used for SSDs.

    Be kind and Mark as Answer if I helped.

    • Marked as answer by Toorch Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:23 PM
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 1:29 AM

All replies

  • Its Windows way of making things easier for users.  You will notice defrag is still enabled.....Windows knows which drives in your system are HDD and SSD (by querying rotational speed and getting back 0 for SSD) and thus does not defrag SSDs.  The option is enabled but ignored for SSDS.  Same thing for Superfetch, the option is enabled but not used for SSDs.

    Be kind and Mark as Answer if I helped.

    • Marked as answer by Toorch Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:23 PM
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 1:29 AM
  • In the last episode of
    <9cdb257b-3c65-46e2-9cf4-3f3bda999346@communitybridge.codeplex.com>,
    Toorch said:
     
    >My questions: What is the difference between the Superfetch service
    >in Windows 7 and the Superfetch service in Windows 8? What did MS
    >changed? Why does it now make sense for a SSD?
     
    I haven't been able to find any formal documentation on what exactly
    changed here, but given that Microsoft put a lot of effort into
    optimizing for SSDs, it makes sense that you would no longer need to
    disable SuperFetch.
     
    It may well simply re-order files on disk to optimize reads during boot
    or application startup that can be serviced in one command instead of
    separate instructions. Despite not having any real seek time, it is
    still faster to perform one larger read than multiple smaller
    random-access reads at once.
     
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 2:52 AM
  • What of it?
     
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 3:06 AM
  • Thank you for your reply (and also all the others)!

    So the difference between Windows 8 and previous versions in the way Superfetch works - as mentioned by Intel - is, that Superfetch is not globally enabled or disabled like in Windows 7, but is now selective enabled or disabled for the individual drives?

    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 12:15 PM

  • My questions: What is the difference between the Superfetch service in Windows 7 and the Superfetch service in Windows 8? What did MS changed? Why does it now make sense for a SSD?

    I've send a mail to Gov Maharaj from MSFT that he should answer the question.

    Check newer episodes of his show in the next weeks to get the answer:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/The-Defrag-Show/


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 2:50 PM
    Answerer
  • ok, I got the mail from Gov and this is his reply
    Rather than disable the entire service, we leave it on, and dynamically ignore SSDs or SSD-like hardware (like SSDs in RAID).




    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    • Marked as answer by Toorch Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:24 PM
    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 5:31 PM
    Answerer
  • Great, thank you!

    Best regards!

    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 6:22 PM
  • I had a SSD drive in my laptop, but I replaced it with an HD.  Now I cannot use the readyboost feature.  I get the "ReadyBoost is not enabled on this computer because the system disk is fast enough that ReadyBoost is unlikely to provide additional benefit." message no matter what.  Turning on the superfetch service did not fix the problem (it was already on)

    Has anyone ever found a solution to this problem?

    Monday, March 24, 2014 11:16 PM
  • I took out the SSD to use in another computer.  I'd like to turn ready boost back on for the machine that has a regular, and somewhat slow old hard drive now.

    Tuesday, March 25, 2014 6:28 PM