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Redirect to internal website RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

     

    I would like to be able to connect to my router from outside of the network. Firstly let me explain the current setup:

     

    The router is configured on 192.168.1.1 and its management port is set to 8081 so as not to conflict with our internal web server on port 80 (because when the router recieves a request for port 80 it forwards 80 onto our internal web server). I can currently connect remotely to it by entering http://mydomain.com:8081

     

    What I would like to achieve is to type in http://router.mydomain.com and it will bring up the routers management page.

     

    Currently I have an A record with my domain registrar called “router” and it points to our external static ip address of the router (not the internal 192.168…)

     

    I thought that there would be a way to accomplish this by first going to our IIS web server which is internal, then that server would handle the redirect but I am not familiar with IIS. Also, if there is another way of doing this without involving the internal web server then that would be great to know.

     

    Many thanks for your help

     

    Friday, January 14, 2011 2:47 PM

Answers

  • Since the objective is to make it easier for your users, I would suggest to change the router's administration page to something other than port 80 so the website works for you users. This way you are the only one inconvienced with having to type in the port in the URL and not your users.

    Otherwise, if your router does not support reading URLs, you will need some sort of Proxy, ISA or TMG server on the outside of the router that can "publish" internal websites and discern request attempts based on URLs and send one URL to the router, and other URLs elsewhere. However, that will complicate your configuration.

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Monday, January 31, 2011 3:23 PM
  • If you don't want the inconvenience of adding the port then create an IIS site that listens on port 80 for the url router.yourdomain.com and forwards it to router.yourdomain.com:8081. This way if you go to www.yourdomain.com your regular Web site will show up but if its router.yourdomain.com then the IIS site will forward it to port 8081 and hit your router's management inferface.

    Open IIS and right click Web sites the new.

    In the host header field (bindings) type router.yourdomain.com. This way both site can listen on port 80 as long as the bindings are different.

    After you finish, go to the newly created Web site properties, Home Directory tab and create a redirection to router.yourdomain.com:8081

     


    Miguel Fra / Falcon IT Services
    Computer & Network Support, Miami, FL
    Visit our Knowledgebase and Support Sharepoint Site

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 2:24 AM

All replies

  • Hello,

    you have to configure port forwarding in the router. In some routers you have also to enable the access on the external ip address.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    Saturday, January 15, 2011 12:57 AM
  • Hello,

     

    First, what type of router? Secondly, who is the authorative DNS server that handles the DNS zone for mydomain.com?

     

    1. If the management port on your router is set to 8081, then you will have to use http://router.mydomain.com:8081 or a redirect is IIS that redirects your to http://router.mydomain.com:8081

     

    2. If you only want to access your router from the inside, then enter an A record in your DNS zone that resolves reouter.mydomain.com to your router's private IP address.

     

    3. If you want your router to be able to grant you management access both from the inside or from the outside, then enter an A record for router.mydomain.com that resolves to your router's public address. Depending on your router, you may have to create a loopback rule (SNAT) that allows traffic originating from the LAN destined for the management port using a WAN IP to be looped back to the router's internal IP address.

     

    Miguel


    Miguel Fra / Falcon IT Services
    Computer & Network Support, Miami, FL
    Visit our Knowledgebase and Support Sharepoint Site

    Saturday, January 15, 2011 3:44 AM
  • As Miguel pointed out, to access the router's configuration page from the outside world, you need to connect to http://router.mydomain.com:8081 otherwise, without the 8081 in the URL, it is automatically using port 80 by default.

    If you set the router to only use SSL (secure HTTP or HTTPS), then you must type in https://router.mydomain.com:8081.

    If I understood your question that you are having difficulty connecting to the router's configuration page from the internet, the above info I provided should take care of it, and IIS on an internal machine would have nothing to do with it.

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Saturday, January 15, 2011 7:25 PM
  • Thanks for the feedback. I have created a host record with my domain registrar and my routers management page is now on port 80 instead of 8081 because i dont want to have to add the port number to my URL. however, because we have an internal web server which also uses port 80 and the router already redirects 80 traffic to that web server, it causes us a conflict. when people now go to that web site it sends them to the routers management page instead of forwarding the request onto the web server. understandable because i guess it doesnt know what you want, the routers management page or the internal web server.

    so, how do i now ensure that when router.mydomain.com is entered it connects to the routers management page, and when www.mydomain.com is entered it sends to the internal web server?

    thanks

    Steve

    Monday, January 31, 2011 1:44 PM
  • Since the objective is to make it easier for your users, I would suggest to change the router's administration page to something other than port 80 so the website works for you users. This way you are the only one inconvienced with having to type in the port in the URL and not your users.

    Otherwise, if your router does not support reading URLs, you will need some sort of Proxy, ISA or TMG server on the outside of the router that can "publish" internal websites and discern request attempts based on URLs and send one URL to the router, and other URLs elsewhere. However, that will complicate your configuration.

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Monday, January 31, 2011 3:23 PM
  • If you don't want the inconvenience of adding the port then create an IIS site that listens on port 80 for the url router.yourdomain.com and forwards it to router.yourdomain.com:8081. This way if you go to www.yourdomain.com your regular Web site will show up but if its router.yourdomain.com then the IIS site will forward it to port 8081 and hit your router's management inferface.

    Open IIS and right click Web sites the new.

    In the host header field (bindings) type router.yourdomain.com. This way both site can listen on port 80 as long as the bindings are different.

    After you finish, go to the newly created Web site properties, Home Directory tab and create a redirection to router.yourdomain.com:8081

     


    Miguel Fra / Falcon IT Services
    Computer & Network Support, Miami, FL
    Visit our Knowledgebase and Support Sharepoint Site

    Wednesday, February 2, 2011 2:24 AM
  • I came across this dialog while researching an internal redirect that I want to do but first I have a curious question:

     question: Referring to the thread above, couldn't the redirect entry have been created at the registrar where router.mydomaincom redirects to router.mydomain.com:8081 instead of even using IIS?

    To my own question: We have an internal exchange 2007 server, Windows 2008, with a Windows 2003 Domain Controller. I access Outlook Web Access(OWA) externally by inputting (external url) http://owa.mysite.com . When I am internal and want to access OWA, I have to use the machine network name in the url (exchange.company.local/owa). If I put in the external url which doesn't make sense to go to the internet and loop right back to our internal site, I will get the management page of my router. So my question is, how do I redirect from being inside on the network my external url (htpp://owa.mysite.com) so it will connect to exchange server? Which computer (domain controller or Exchange server ) and service would I be looking at?

    Thanks

    Thursday, August 16, 2012 5:02 PM
  • Simply create a zone called owa.mysite.com and give it the internal IP and leave the hostname blank.

    This is a very common solution we all use in every Exchange environment.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP/EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2 & Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Technical Blogs & Videos: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Thursday, August 16, 2012 6:35 PM