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Windows 7: Confirmation when clicking 'Shutdown' RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Hey all,

    I'm using Windows 7 at home. It's all good, very nice interface, quick etc etc. But, one thing that I have found is that having no confirmation button after clicking 'Shut down' can be quite annoying.
    Both my mum and my other half have both shut down the computer because they didnt click the arrow to log off.

    Does anyone else miss this? I dont think Vista had a confirmation either, but I don't have that at home so haven't had much experience of it.

    Paul
    Paul
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 10:18 AM

All replies

  • no no no no pls no confirmation [kinda like XP had] -- when I press "shut down" I expect the computer to shut down , not wait for two minutes for some stupid confirmation if I really want to do what I just did!
    Regards, Kristaps.
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 11:08 AM
  • Mean what you click and click what you mean!

    That's my 2 cents.
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 11:11 AM
  • I'm with kristaps here. When I park my car and click the remote control to close the doors, I don't want the car asking me whether I'm sure, and on confirmation.. Are you really sure you want to close the doors?
    Windows is the same thing. When I hit "Shut down", I mean shut down.
    The other way around, when I lit the computer, I don't want it to ask me whether I'm sure either.

    Regards

    Rem
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 11:15 AM
  • Right click the "Shut down" and select "Properties", then change "Power button action:" to "Log off" or one of the other options instead of the default "Shut down".
    Then you won't accidently shut down and you will not have to click the arrow and hunt for some other desired action.

    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 11:30 AM
  • NO DESKTOP IN THE WORLD, BE IT LINUX, MAC, PREVIOUS WINDOWS, ETC SHUTSDOWN *WITHOUT*CONFIRMATION*. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST ANNOYING THING MICROSOFT EVER CREATED (INCLUDING VISTA)

    COMPUTERS SHOULD ADAPT TO HUMANS, NO VICE-VERSA, AND HUMANS ARE PRONE TO ERRORS. PERIOD.

    CAPS ARE INTENTIONALLY ON, TO EXPRESS THE ANGER.

    Saturday, June 20, 2009 11:46 AM
  • at least there should be an option for user to control whether a confirmation is required....
    sometimes im working on important stuff an accidentally shutdown is definitely not desired...

    Wednesday, October 7, 2009 6:42 AM
  • Personally, I use Proton2's method.  Most of the time, I only want to put my laptop to sleep, so it saves me steps every day.  When I want to actually shut down or restart, I have to explictly click on one of those options.  Then the OS then does what I told it to do without nagging me "are you sure?".  In my opinion, having to click three times IS a confirmation.


    Ralph Bley
    Wednesday, October 7, 2009 12:12 PM
  • I have Ubuntu 9.04 running on VirtualBox, and they have this "confirmation screen", which gives you 60 (!) seconds to cancel the shutdown, and I must say that it's annoying as ____. The most annoying thing is the 60 second wait-time. Excuse me, but how long does an average trip to a button take? I'd guess half a second at most. So why the 60 seconds then? Users shouldn't be treated as retarded by default.

    But enough about Ubuntu - my point here is that IMO these confirmation screens are bad, since they block your actions when you want them to happen, and they are actually useful (for OMG-I-SHUT-DOWN-MY-COMPUTER-WHAT-NOW situations) only once every two years or so.

    Besides, it's pretty hard to click Shut Down by accident, since it's quite away from other buttons and you are required to open the Start Menu (user interaction) to activate it.

    Oh, and shutdown -s -t 00 ftw :D
    Regards,
    Kristaps.

    P.S.: Epic shoop is epic.
    Wednesday, October 7, 2009 12:50 PM
  • Thanks for this suggestion !
    Something is better than nothing !!!
    Friday, October 30, 2009 9:21 AM
  • Personally, I use Proton2's method.  Most of the time, I only want to put my laptop to sleep, so it saves me steps every day.  When I want to actually shut down or restart, I have to explictly click on one of those options.  Then the OS then does what I told it to do without nagging me "are you sure?".  In my opinion, having to click three times IS a confirmation.


    Ralph Bley
    The problem is that it's very easy to accidentally click the wrong item in the popup menu (I just mis-clicked 'Log Off' when I intended to click 'Switch User'.)

    An (optional) prompt is certainly welcome.
    Monday, November 9, 2009 8:38 AM
  • There should be an optional confirmation, no question about it :-) this could be added to the properties menu and would prevent many inadvertent shutdowns.

    Saturday, February 6, 2010 5:49 PM
  • You can't create a confirmation, but you can change the button entirely:  right-click it and choose Properties, then change it to be what you really want it to do.

    I miss Vista's dual-button:  one for shutdown, one for switch (or whatever it was).




    If this was helpful, please vote by clicking the green triangle. If it solves the issue, click Propose as Answer. Thanks!
    Sunday, February 7, 2010 6:47 PM
  • Shawn B. Keene, my May 2009 reply...

    "Right click the "Shut down" and select "Properties", then change "Power button action:" to "Log off" or one of the other options instead of the default "Shut down".
    Then you won't accidently shut down and you will not have to click the arrow and hunt for some other desired action."

    already suggested this.
    Monday, February 8, 2010 8:25 AM
  • no no no no pls no confirmation [kinda like XP had] -- when I press "shut down" I expect the computer to shut down , not wait for two minutes for some stupid confirmation if I really want to do what I just did!
    Regards, Kristaps.

    I think that's a naive way to think. I don't want an accidental press of a menu button or keyboard button to result in the loss of data from open programs. For cripes Sake, just recently I accidentally dropped my headphones on my keyboard (thanks to my cat jumping on my lap at the exact same time), apparently hitting the right key(s) to result in my computer to shut down. There is no excuse for there to not be a confirmation box to prevent accidental shutdowns like that. It's one of the most retarded design choices for any program, especially when there exists multiple ways to accidentally screw yourself over.
    Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:30 PM
  • I hope Microsoft realizes how stupid it is to not have that confirmation box and patches it back in. Data loss from an accidental miss click is not fun.
    Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:33 PM
  • I have Ubuntu 9.04 running on VirtualBox, and they have this "confirmation screen", which gives you 60 (!) seconds to cancel the shutdown, and I must say that it's annoying as ____. The most annoying thing is the 60 second wait-time. Excuse me, but how long does an average trip to a button take? I'd guess half a second at most. So why the 60 seconds then? Users shouldn't be treated as retarded by default.

    But enough about Ubuntu - my point here is that IMO these confirmation screens are bad, since they block your actions when you want them to happen, and they are actually useful (for OMG-I-SHUT-DOWN-MY-COMPUTER-WHAT-NOW situations) only once every two years or so.

    Besides, it's pretty hard to click Shut Down by accident, since it's quite away from other buttons and you are required to open the Start Menu (user interaction) to activate it.

    Oh, and shutdown -s -t 00 ftw :D
    Regards,
    Kristaps.

    P.S.: Epic shoop is epic.

    You forget about keyboard buttons and other shortcuts that exists to initiate a shutdown. It's not all just Start button menus.
    Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:35 PM
  • NO DESKTOP IN THE WORLD, BE IT LINUX, MAC, PREVIOUS WINDOWS, ETC SHUTSDOWN *WITHOUT*CONFIRMATION*. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST ANNOYING THING MICROSOFT EVER CREATED (INCLUDING VISTA)

    COMPUTERS SHOULD ADAPT TO HUMANS, NO VICE-VERSA, AND HUMANS ARE PRONE TO ERRORS. PERIOD.

    CAPS ARE INTENTIONALLY ON, TO EXPRESS THE ANGER.

    needs more !!! for added affect with the Caps.
    Tuesday, February 9, 2010 10:36 PM
  • Don't agree. Having a cat near a computer is like using a hairdryer while sitting in a bathtub full of water. It's just not done.
    You can't punish the whole world by making MS implement a confirmation button.
    This is going to be like the UAC thing; people want security, it's implemented and turned off straight away by those same users because it is an annoyance.
    Setthe default value for the startbutton to Sleep. Best option ever invented.

    Regards

    Rem
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 9:46 AM
  • Don't agree. Having a cat near a computer is like using a hairdryer while sitting in a bathtub full of water. It's just not done.
    You can't punish the whole world by making MS implement a confirmation button.
    This is going to be like the UAC thing; people want security, it's implemented and turned off straight away by those same users because it is an annoyance.
    Setthe default value for the startbutton to Sleep. Best option ever invented.

    Regards

    Rem

    How is it "punishing the whole world" when it's just an option which is turned off by default? And UAC is much better than running with an unrestricted access token by default as was in Windows XP.
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 2:10 PM
  • Disabling UAC is nonsense. No discussion.
    Punishing the whole world? Of course. Like I stated in one of my earlier posts. When I park my car and want to close the doors, I don't want my car to ask me whether I'm sure. The probability for me to leave the carkeys inside when closing is far too small.
    For a computer things are akin. You are sure about what you are doing or you don't play. Cats are no valid reason to change the default behaviour of an OS for the rest of the world; Sorry guys, but I don't buy that.

    Regards

    Rem
    Wednesday, February 10, 2010 8:04 PM
  • First I don't know why all of you have to act like children arguing over a toy.  If a person wants a confirmation then that person should have the ability to set an option to enable it.  If a person doesn't then he or she should be able to set that option to disable it.

    I know there will be hate mail but personally this thread sounds like a day in kindergarten!

    Kristaps, Mjlang, Zeus76, Costinel and others I may have missed – this site is about solutions, not voicing opinions.  Remember that opinions are like @$$ holes, everyone has one and they ALL stink!

    Okay, rant off.

    Anyways Paul if you want a form of shutdown confirmation then perform these steps.

    1.     Click Start>Run.

    2.     If you don't have the run command in your start menu you can put it there in the Taskbar properties - Start Menu Tab, Customize, and scroll down till you see Run Command and check it.

    3.     Alternatively you can press the R key while holding the Windows key on your keyboard.

    4.     Type gpedit.msc and click OK.  The Local Group Policy Editor will appear.  Be very careful here, don't do anything arbitrarily.  You may want to maximize this form.

    5.     In the left side open Administrative Templates under Computer Configuration and select System.

    6.     In the right side locate and double click "Display Shutdown Event Tracker".

    7.     Select Enabled.

    8.     Select Always in the "Shutdown Event Tracker should be displayed" area and click OK.

    9.     Close the Local Group Policy Editor.  There is no Okay or Cancel.  This is why you need to be careful!

    Now, when you click Shutdown Windows 7 a “Shutdown Event Tracker” form will ask you why you are shutting down.

    This should work with all permutations of Windows 7 and Vista.  I don’t have Vista, nor do I have the home version of 7.

    You now have a cancel button to cancel the shutdown, or you can press ESC or just click outside of the "Shutdown Event Tracker" form.

    The one caveat is that you have to enter a comment to enable the Okay button, no big deal.

    I searched this because I use the Run command often and have caught myself hitting the Shutdown button on occasion (when I don't use the Windows Key+R key combination).  Not having some way of stopping an accidental shutdown gives a type of a "single point of failure" towards losing any unsaved work.

    I don’t care what others think, that is unacceptable!

    Sunday, April 11, 2010 2:03 PM
  • Thanks GilberB, a voice of reason among the chaos.  Windows xp asked you what you wanted to do when you press shutdown so why not Windows 7???.  Your solution is a very reasonable alternative to the old Windows XP meathod.
    Monday, April 19, 2010 7:44 PM
  • I'm with GilbertB and Costinel . Such a dangerous action as shutting down a system ALWAYS requires at least 1 confirmation.

    For those about saying "When I park my car and click the remote control to close the doors, I don't want the car asking me whether I'm sure, and on confirmation. Are you really sure you want to close the doors?". This is just because you are "sure" of what you are doing. What would happen if you are driving your car at 120Km/h and you accidentally push the electronic shutdown button on you car? This is a dangerous situation, so won't you like to have that confirmation (or in that case automatic electronic procedures) that determine that the engine should not be shut down?. But we're humans and we commit errors. We do need a confirmation request!! STOP. Now, anyone that has never pressed the wrong option in a popup menu may throw the first stone.

     

    GilbertB's answer is the first sensible one I've found in months!!! And is correct about opinions and answers. When I ask something like "How could this things be done?" in a technical place I like to get answers to this as "Yes, it could be done that way", or "No it could not be done because of that matter". I don't like answers like "Why do you want to do that? Better avoid that effort and do not do that, it's much complicated". When I look for answers, many times I only get opinions...

    And that was my opinion here, but I will not only make that. I REALLY want this answer to be found so I'm replying with a Spanish solution to this BIG PROBLEM!!!.

     

    Texto en Español

    Confirmación al apagar Windows 7 y Windows Vista para el menú Inicio:

    Windows 7 y Windows Vista no tienen una confirmación directa al pulsar accidentalmente el botón de apagado del menú Inicio, con lo cual podemos perder trabajo que tengamos en aplicaciones abiertas que no preguntarán si queremos guardar los datos antes de cerrarse por completo y apagarse el ordenador.

    Una solución como apunta GilbertB es crear una directiva de políticas para mostrar una ventana de sucesos de apagado al estilo de los servidores Windows 2003, en la que se nos pregunta por qué queremos apagar el ordenador, y que nos da opción a abortar el apagado si nos hemos equivocado o accidentalmente se ha iniciado la tarea de apagado del ordenador.

    Para hacer esto, debemos ir al botón Inicio. Abajo en el cuadradito donde pone "Buscar programas y archivos" tecleamos "gpedit.msc" (sin las comillas) y nos debe aparecer la ventana de edición de directivas de equipo y usuarios. Ahora nos vamos desplazando por el menú izquierdo por "Directiva Equipo Local -> Configuración del Equipo -> Plantillas Administrativas -> Sistema" Una vez en esta opción veremos a la derecha las opciones. Debemos localizar entre ellas "Mostrar rastreador de eventos de apagado". Hacer docle click sobre esta opción, configurarlo como "Habilitado" y cerciorarnos de que la opción "Siempre" está marcada. Pulsamos en aceptar y cerramos ventana.

    Ahora se nos pedirá una confirmación antes de apagar el ordenador.

    Tuesday, June 1, 2010 10:44 AM
  • Mi two cents here too:

     

    Confirmation could be done in registry:

     

    You could Enable the Shutdown Event Tracker.

    In Registry Editor, navigate to

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Reliability

    Name:ShutdownReasonUI (REG_DWORD)

    1=enable 0=disable

     

    Personally I will be using it in unatteded installations.

    Tuesday, June 1, 2010 10:56 AM
  • Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:20 AM
  • It's not like shut down is activated by hovering in the middle of the screen or something -- it's "protected" by the Start Orb and its pretty inconvenient placement (you can't just shove the pointer in a corner and click, like w/ Start), just like jets have those sweet covers on some switches.
    Yeah!
    Thursday, July 15, 2010 10:14 AM
  • Yeah, yeah, Kristaps... just keep writing the same thing over and over again... why don't you close your ears and go "lalalalalalalacanthearyoulalalalala" at the same time, huh? We've all already established that you don't want any confirmation, we know it, we've grasped your stance in this matter.

    However, like the good guy Gilbert said, it's all about CHOICES, not unchangeable defaults. You *are* aware of the word, right? "Choice"? As in, you can *choose* not to have a confirmation, someone else may *choose* to have three of them.

    Oh, by the way... I can tell you what "Shut down" is next to: it's right next to the bloody arrow with the rest of the user options , that's what it's next to!
    Moreover... nothing's "protected" by the start orb, because that's the thing you have to press to launch any program! The start menu is not about "protection", but *convenience* (if such a thing exists in Win7)! At the very least, there should be some "delay" to give you time to press "Cancel", which I personally love as an idea. And that Ubuntu user that scorned that idea [edit: oh... surprise surprise, it's you again!] should know that in Linux, you can change E-V-E-R-Y-T-H-I-N-G, including the shut-down delay time. And also, you can simply click the "Shut Down" button, if it can't happen soon enough for you.

    At the end of the day, when users select "Shut down" it either means they're going away from the computer, or they did it by mistake. If you're going away from the computer, it won't make any difference whether the computer will shut down like, immediately, or 60 seconds later, since in any case, you won't be there to see it!
    However, if you hit it by mistake, the first scenario (immediate) will just leave you resting your forehead in your palms while you're observing the fruits of your labour becoming digital vapour, whereas the second scenario (delay) will just make you go "aw ____" whilst clicking "cancel".

    All in all... POWER TO THE PEOPLE! The users should be enabled (by Microsoft) to CHOOSE how they want their computer to react.

    What really annoys me is YOUR stance in this matter, Kristaps, which in simple words is "NO I DON'T WANT ANY CHOICE, I WANT THINGS TO BE THE WAY **I** WANT THEM".

    Really democratic, by the way...

    Saturday, July 17, 2010 11:51 AM
  • When I park my car and want to close the doors, I don't want my car to ask me whether I'm sure. The probability for me to leave the carkeys inside when closing is far too small.
    For a computer things are akin. You are sure about what you are doing or you don't play. Cats are no valid reason to change the default behaviour of an OS for the rest of the world; Sorry guys, but I don't buy that.

    Regards

    Rem
    Worst analogy ever.  If you lock your car doors by mistake, how long does it take to undo this?  If you can shutdown and boot your computer in the same amount of time, I want your computer.  In a close second place is your cat and hairdryer analogy.  Because a cat near a computer usually results in death?  It's no surprise that all the whiners on this thread are so unhelpful.  Go pat yourselves on the backs because you've never mistakenly shutdown a computer.  It doesn't necessarily make your life less of a failure.
    Monday, October 11, 2010 6:39 PM
  • You'd want my computer. 35 seconds is what it takes. My first computer experience was with commodore 64 (no confirmation on shut down) and at the university with the Arpanet (definitely no confirmation on shutdown).

    Analogies are used to make something easier to understand and are therefor often exagerated.

    Of course I've run into stupid computer issues mostly due to me being stupid or distracted. I switched the default behaviour of the start button to send the computer to sleep instead of shut down. Like I said some time ago (understatement), that is the best improvement made on windows.

    Other things that can restart or just shutdown your computer exist and have always existed. Those things didn't issue a message either (or one of the "you can't cancel it" kind).

    BTW if you have any constructive input, be welcome. I participate on this website to help. I'm not paid for it. I do it on my spare time, but will disappear from here soon enough. Recognition is not what I'm looking for, but criticism from people who have nothing better to do then criticise... I can live without that. Anyway my life is not a failure and I'm rather taken to live it well.

    So, see you

    Rem

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 11:20 AM
  • I would like to see a Shutdown confirmation.  When I am packing up my laptop in a hurry to get out of the office and click on Shutdown without looking for the tiny information icon, the last thing I want to see is "Installing 1 of 37 updates".  IMHO pls give us back the choices we used to have.
    Thursday, October 28, 2010 1:26 PM
  • Try this to get shutdown confirmation on Windows 7:

    http://blog.seemasystems.com/?p=99

    It works for me!

     

    Friday, February 4, 2011 3:33 PM
  • Ur sm kinda m***** and realy waitin not clicking the option u need? Ubuntu unlikely win is way safer from web troyans. IT IS EASY to miss click when ur on hurry by da way.
    Tuesday, February 15, 2011 4:59 PM
  • Thanks for the tip on how to enable the confirmation for shut down. I am glad it isn't there by default but it's good to know one can enable it if needs be.

    My question: Is there a similar method to remove the confirmation when you press "force close" when shutdown stalls? Once I press a button which is so strongly worded, it is strange and annoying to have to confirm the action.

    Since this board suffers from its fair share of similes, I'll add my own. It seems like this behaviour would be akin to hitting the big red STOP button on a piece of industrial machinery, then being asked if you are really, really sure you wanted to do that. Annoying. And redundant.
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 10:50 PM
  • I looked around but the only slightly relevant item I found was the WaitToKillAppTimeout, which is how long Windows will wait before it just clicks the force close button on your behalf. By default, Windows will give each program 2 seconds each to finish what its doing before killing it. If you have several apps stuck, or one app running as multiple instances that each have unsaved changes, like Exel for instance, the duration of time you see that waiting screen could add up. If you ignore it, it should complete on its own after the delay. This wasn't always the case, previous versions of Windows gave each app 20 seconds before even asking you, an at that point would pause until it had your answer.  This was great if your main worry was being able to go back and answer that 'do you want to save changes' to a Word document you forgot to close, but it resulted in many fried laptops that were told to shutdown, then promptly shoved into a case/bag to simmer while waiting for a reply.  At least Windows 7 improved that situation.

     


    Shawn Keene
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 11:11 PM
  • Yeah, GilbertB's post is the best answer to this question.
    Thursday, August 25, 2011 8:47 PM
  • Personally, I think Microsoft should have made a shutdown confirmation dialog an easily configurable option, which is disabled by default.

    -Noel


    Sunday, August 28, 2011 10:47 PM
  • I'm with kristaps here. When I park my car and click the remote control to close the doors, I don't want the car asking me whether I'm sure, and on confirmation.. Are you really sure you want to close the doors?


    I know this is an ancient comment, but I did want to mention that most modern cars warn you by dinging or beeping the internal chimes when you open the door and leave the keys in the ignition.

    -Noel

    Sunday, August 28, 2011 10:50 PM
  • Thanks GilbertB for being helpful.  Promotion for you, I hope.

    My first encounter with Windows 7 was with my son's Grandmother.  I had to transfer some files or download a program or run the MS antivirus program for her and in doing so, I accidently hit the shut down button because the curser jumped on its own to the exact position of the shut down button location.  And the computer instantly SHUT DOWN...no confirmation or anything.  All I could do was watch it happen and shake my head.  This caused major problems when I turned the computer back on.  We lost our place in the process and this caused duplication and error messages, and software problems. 

    I thought back then, "gee, I'm glad I still have Windows XP".  This never would have happened with XP due to the confirmation step.   There should be a choice by the user to determine whether or not to have such an important feature. 

    I've since been given Windows 7 Ultimate as a gift and I still am nervous that this feature is STILL missing.  The options given still do not prevent the above scenario as some form of disconnection still occurs. 

    I hope MS writes a program and let each user decide it they want to download the program or not.  If a fix is made for this...please let me be the first to receive it.

    Thursday, September 1, 2011 2:36 AM
  • Gilbert... thanks for the simple solution.

    But like others said there should be a configurable option with an option to turn on/off or have a timer with it - 1-5 seconds... If people want a warning (which they are fully entitled to) which I know 99% of my users here at work do, then great. If you dont want it - then dont have it.

    It just means your life is that awesome that you cant take an extra 5 seconds to click YES when it says are you sure.

    Its great when your mouse stalls, then all of a sudden it has found its way to SHUTDOWN, and its game over to that 6 hrs of work your doing.

     

    '...punish the whole world'... ROTFLMAO! Dumbest thing ever said on the interweb!

    God theres some clowns on this planet.

    Thursday, September 1, 2011 4:28 AM
  • NO DESKTOP IN THE WORLD, BE IT LINUX, MAC, PREVIOUS WINDOWS, ETC SHUTSDOWN *WITHOUT*CONFIRMATION*. THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST ANNOYING THING I AGREE COMPLETELY!  

    TO NOT CONFIRM AN IMPORTANT SYSTEM EVENT LIKE SHUTDOWN IS ABSURD!

    Sunday, September 16, 2012 1:23 AM
  • Pcantele, did you see Gilbert's suggestion up above?  You actually can enable a confirmation.  It's a very nice "To Work" option he's documented that for whatever reason isn't the default.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Sunday, September 16, 2012 4:02 AM
  • sorry to bring back this thread from the dead. by now we are in the cat and mouse game with m$. thanks to "classicshell" program found on sourceforge we have the confirmation AND xp-style shutdown/restart/sleep/hibernate/logoff/switch user dialog back in winnt 6.x
    Sunday, September 16, 2012 9:03 AM
  • ClassicShell may be singlehandedly saving Windows.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:54 PM
  • Thanks everyone, Proton2's solution worked for me. Click START, right click on SHUT DOWN and change properties so the SHUT DOWN icon is changed to LOG OFF now.

    Even after changing the icon to Log Off, I can still click on the down arrow that is beside LOG OFF and access SHUT DOWN, so that's my confirmation. Before leaving the office it takes no extra time to shutdown, just one more mouse click for the drop down arrow. Great solution!

    My need is that when I'm away from the office, I access my Win7 PC by remote control. When I'm finished a session, I want to log off my account for security. But if I'm not careful, I can accidentally shut the PC down, then I'm in trouble because I have no way of restarting the PC remotely  to access my files. The PC is a laptop and doesn't have Wake-On-LAN. 




    • Edited by VancouverGuy Wednesday, November 7, 2012 6:55 PM added clarification
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 6:54 PM
  • first of all, there are two "very" annoying things when browsing forums:

    1) people saying that you are not right or you have no need of what you're asking for;

    2) people suggesting to do something different.

    these are totally pointless and they can only result in a waste of time for everyone reading the thread.

    i like windows 6.1 as the best of all the windows ever produced by microsoft - having yet no chance to take a look of any windows 6.2 - but the "no shut down confirmation" issue is really annoying and finally wrong.

    four good reasons to say this:

    1) although windows won't shut down/restart/log off while any document is waiting for being saved, i "want" the full right to open documents just for reading; windows should ask for a confirmation whenever a single user interface is running, not only in case of suspended operations.

    2) windows doesn't really check for open programs before a shut down/logoff operation; it just tries to end each running process and eventually stops at the first one that's waiting for some user interaction. the user has the chance to press a "cancel" button, but it actually means "aborting" the operation because the shut down process has been already started resulting in several processes/services stopped.

    3) users must have the "right" to do mistakes. people can just push a mouse button accidentally or onto the wrong place, or strike the wrong key that would produce a log off instead of a lock. operating system must "suppose" that any request for closing the current session can be just a mistake.

    4) windows still offers several ways to close a session without using the start button - mainly executing the "shutdown" command with some parameters - each of them allowing the user to cancel the operation within a number of second just by calling again a windows command, so there is no point in having removed these possibilities from the user interface. i use these commands instead of the user interface because i "want" the chance to cancel my operation and i recommend the same to users getting annoyed from this issue, because for sure we won't have any such response like restoring the old operation mode.

    a "good" suggestion can be to set up the o.s. to remember the windows that were open before closing the session, although this wouldn't avoid wasting time in wait of a complete reboot.

    finally, don't compare shutting down a computer with closing a car. at some point you will come back to your car and just find all things exactly where you left them before. it's quite different

    regards.

    Tuesday, February 12, 2013 8:29 PM
  • Thank you. That was helpful.
    Thursday, September 5, 2013 12:20 PM
  • Thanks GilbertB for the best technical workaround.  But, unfortunately, our IT department is now so paranoid we've lost access to our own group policy settings.  So I've adapted Proton2's solution which, in its original form, still potentially results in loss of state/edits/data when I'm inadvertently logged off.  Here's my very-safe version:

    1.    Right click the [Start] button and select Properties.
    2.    On the Start Menu tab, change the Power button action field to Switch User.
    3.    Now, if you accidently click what is now the [Switch User] button, it will take you to the user-login screen where you can just log right back in as yourself, with no loss of state/edits/data.
    4.    When you really do want to shutdown, just use the (now) [Switch User] button’s drop-down list to find that option.
    Monday, January 25, 2016 7:07 PM
  • See my even-safer version of Proton2's workaround, in my reply to GilbertB, below...
    Monday, January 25, 2016 7:10 PM
  • apparently, win7 han't prompt when you accidentally clicking shut down or restart while you want to logoff or sleep. BUT, you can get rid that button from start menu by this tutorial : http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/7553/remove-shutdown-and-restart-buttons-in-windows-7/

    you can set with your own.

    so, how do i shutdown my computer then? well, you can use alt+f4 on desktop then popup will appear which action you want to choose.

    no more annoying shutdown by accidentally clicked.

    Saturday, February 20, 2016 7:26 PM