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Disc C: --> BMR RRS feed

  • Question

  • All greetings! It would be desirable to understand, whether it is possible to restore from backup disk C: on any equipment, made by means of DPM 2010, just as from backup Bare Metal Recovery? And in a case if I protect Server 2003, there in general wasn't present Bare Metal Recovery, whether I can it in general quickly to restore?
    • Moved by Praveen D [MSFT] Thursday, August 26, 2010 6:03 PM Moving to DPM BMR Forum (From:Data Protection Manager)
    Monday, August 23, 2010 1:56 PM

Answers

  • For Win2K3, what Mike has suggested is the right one like using the SRT for BMR backups. But for WIN2K8 and later OS versions, You can safely rely on the Windows Backup to restore on alternate hardware as well, it is much reliable than earlier WIN2K3 BMR/ASR recovery. But some important points note here are, the recovery target has to have higher disk configuration than the backed-up one. If you are restoring a 32 Bit OS backup then you need to use 32 bit Setup/Install media/WINRE media(and same for 64 bit as well). To be able able to do sucessfull BMR recovery, you have to backup allcritical volumes using -allcritical options of Windows backup(DPM uses this option so all DPM BMR backups are BMR able, but it will not have data volumes backup).
    Thanks, Praveen D [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Friday, August 27, 2010 6:08 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    DPM 2010 utilizes Windows backup feature for both SystemState and BMR backups. The support for restoring to dissimilar hardware is defined by Windows and generally speaking, it not supported.   BMR for Wndows 2003 is only possible by using the DPM System Recovery Tool (SRT) a seperate installable product that shipped on the DPM 2007 and DPM 2010 installation media. In either case, nothing is preventing you from restoring to disimilar hardware, but as noted it isn't supported and may not work 100% of the time.

     


    Regards, Mike J [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Monday, August 23, 2010 2:31 PM
    Moderator
  • For Win2K3, what Mike has suggested is the right one like using the SRT for BMR backups. But for WIN2K8 and later OS versions, You can safely rely on the Windows Backup to restore on alternate hardware as well, it is much reliable than earlier WIN2K3 BMR/ASR recovery. But some important points note here are, the recovery target has to have higher disk configuration than the backed-up one. If you are restoring a 32 Bit OS backup then you need to use 32 bit Setup/Install media/WINRE media(and same for 64 bit as well). To be able able to do sucessfull BMR recovery, you have to backup allcritical volumes using -allcritical options of Windows backup(DPM uses this option so all DPM BMR backups are BMR able, but it will not have data volumes backup).
    Thanks, Praveen D [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Friday, August 27, 2010 6:08 AM
  • Hi Praveen,

    Because of disk space limitations, we are only capturing C drive for BMR Protection by editing the BmrBackup.cmd file.

    "start  /WAIT %SystemRoot%\system32\wbadmin.exe start backup -include:C: -quiet -backuptarget:%1"

    Now when I go to restore the BMR if it does not have all critical drives it wont show up during the restore process.

    BMR restore process:

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/dpm/archive/2011/11/01/data-protection-manager-2010-and-bare-metal-restore.aspx

    Is there a way to just do a BMR restore for only C drive (OS Parition)

    Tuesday, October 28, 2014 7:02 PM
  • Hi,

    No - C: alone will not be enough for a BMR restore, you also need systemstate and the system partition.

    You need to ADD the system partition by using mountvol.exe to get the volume guid, and add it to the include.

    C:\Windows\system32>mountvol
    Creates, deletes, or lists a volume mount point.

    MOUNTVOL [drive:]path VolumeName
    MOUNTVOL [drive:]path /D
    MOUNTVOL [drive:]path /L
    MOUNTVOL [drive:]path /P
    MOUNTVOL /R
    MOUNTVOL /N
    MOUNTVOL /E

        path        Specifies the existing NTFS directory where the mount
                    point will reside.
        VolumeName  Specifies the volume name that is the target of the mount
                    point.
        /D          Removes the volume mount point from the specified directory.
        /L          Lists the mounted volume name for the specified directory.
        /P          Removes the volume mount point from the specified directory,
                    dismounts the volume, and makes the volume not mountable.
                    You can make the volume mountable again by creating a volume
                    mount point.
        /R          Removes volume mount point directories and registry settings
                    for volumes that are no longer in the system.
        /N          Disables automatic mounting of new volumes.
        /E          Re-enables automatic mounting of new volumes.

    Possible values for VolumeName along with current mount points are:

        \\?\Volume{05abb0d4-759d-11e0-a684-806e6f6e6963}\
            *** NO MOUNT POINTS ***
           
        \\?\Volume{c8d8cd04-c8b6-11de-8261-806e6f6e6963}\
            C:\


    Based on the above, Modify the BmrBackup.cmd to use the following commands.

    start  /WAIT %SystemRoot%\system32\wbadmin.exe start backup -systemstate -include:c:,\\?\Volume{05abb0d4-759d-11e0-a684-806e6f6e6963}\ -quiet -backuptarget:%1


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Thursday, October 30, 2014 10:19 PM
    Moderator