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Windows Shutting down unexpectedly RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I am running windows 8.1 on a 1 year old laptop. When I am doing normal things like surfing the net, I get sudden crashes and when I turn on my computer again, it acts like it had just shut down. Is there anything I can do to stop this from happening?

    Thanks!

    Edit: dmp file is available if anyone wants it! Thanks!
    • Edited by Piers194 Monday, June 23, 2014 2:08 AM
    Monday, June 23, 2014 2:07 AM

Answers

  • With that said, it's either:

    1. Faulty RAM.

    2. Faulty Power Supply (more likely).

    To rule out #1, please run Memtest for NO LESS than ~8 passes (several hours):

    Memtest86+:

    Download Memtest86+ here:

    http://www.memtest.org/

    Which should I download?

    You can either download the pre-compiled ISO that you would burn to a CD and then boot from the CD, or you can download the auto-installer for the USB key. What this will do is format your USB drive, make it a bootable device, and then install the necessary files. Both do the same job, it's just up to you which you choose, or which you have available (whether it's CD or USB).

    Do note that some older generation motherboards do not support USB-based booting, therefore your only option is CD (or Floppy if you really wanted to).

    How Memtest works:

    Memtest86 writes a series of test patterns to most memory addresses, reads back the data written, and compares it for errors.

    The default pass does 9 different tests, varying in access patterns and test data. A tenth test, bit fade, is selectable from the menu. It writes all memory with zeroes, then sleeps for 90 minutes before checking to see if bits have changed (perhaps because of refresh problems). This is repeated with all ones for a total time of 3 hours per pass.

    Many chipsets can report RAM speeds and timings via SPD (Serial Presence Detect) or EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles), and some even support changing the expected memory speed. If the expected memory speed is overclocked, Memtest86 can test that memory performance is error-free with these faster settings.

    Some hardware is able to report the "PAT status" (PAT: enabled or PAT: disabled). This is a reference to Intel Performance acceleration technology; there may be BIOS settings which affect this aspect of memory timing.

    This information, if available to the program, can be displayed via a menu option.

    Any other questions, they can most likely be answered by reading this great guide here:

    http://forum.canardpc.com/threads/28864-FAQ-please-read-before-posting

    Regards,

    Patrick

    “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.” - Dalai Lama

    • Marked as answer by Michael_LS Tuesday, July 15, 2014 6:27 AM
    Monday, June 30, 2014 12:12 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    In order to assist you, we will need the .DMP files to analyze what exactly occurred at the time of the crash, etc.

    If you don't know where .DMP files are located, here's how to get to them:

    1. Navigate to the %systemroot%\Minidump folder.

    2. Copy any and all DMP files in the Minidump folder to your Desktop and then zip up these files.

    3. Upload the zip containing the .DMP files to Onedrive or a hosting site of your choice and paste in your reply. Preferred sites: Onedrive, Mediafire, Dropbox, etc. Nothing with wait-timers, download managers, etc.

    4 (optional): The type of .DMP files located in the Minidump folder are known as Small Memory Dumps. In %systemroot% there will be what is known as a Kernel-Dump (if your system is set to generate). It is labeled MEMORY.DMP. The difference between Small Memory Dumps and Kernel-Dumps in the simplest definition is a Kernel-Dump contains much more information at the time of the crash, therefore allowing further debugging of your issue. If your upload speed permits it, and you aren't going against any strict bandwidth and/or usage caps, etc, the Kernel-Dump is the best choice. Do note that Kernel-Dumps are much larger in size due to containing much more info, which is why I mentioned upload speed, etc.

    If you are going to use Onedrive but don't know how to upload to it, please visit the following:

    Upload photos and files to Onedrive.

    After doing that, to learn how to share the link to the file if you are unaware, please visit the following link - Share files and folders and change permissions and view 'Get a link'.

    Please note that any "cleaner" programs such as TuneUpUtilities, CCleaner, etc, by default will delete .DMP files upon use. With this said, if you've run such software, you will need to allow the system to crash once again to generate a crash dump.

    If your computer is not generating .DMP files, please do the following:

    1. Start > type %systemroot% which should show the Windows folder, click on it. Once inside that folder, ensure there is a Minidump folder created. If not, CTRL-SHIFT-N to make a New Folder and name it Minidump.

    2. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Performance > Settings > Advanced > Ensure there's a check-mark for 'Automatically manage paging file size for all drives'.

    3. Windows key + Pause key. This should bring up System. Click Advanced System Settings on the left > Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Settings > System Failure > ensure there is a check mark next to 'Write an event to the system log'.

    Ensure Small Memory Dump is selected and ensure the path is %systemroot%\Minidump.

    4. Double check that the WERS is ENABLED:

    Start > Search > type services.msc > Under the name tab, find Windows Error Reporting Service > If the status of the service is not Started then right click it and select Start. Also ensure that under Startup Type it is set to Automatic rather than Manual. You can do this by right clicking it, selecting properties, and under General selecting startup type to 'Automatic', and then click Apply.

    If you cannot get into normal mode to do any of this, please do this via Safe Mode.

    Regards,

    Patrick

    “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.” - Dalai Lama

    • Proposed as answer by Wade__Liu Tuesday, June 24, 2014 7:16 AM
    Monday, June 23, 2014 7:33 AM
  • Hi, 

    Thanks for all the help!

    However, when my computer shuts down on its own, it does not seem like it has been generating dump files. In the past when my computer crashes, it has generated them before but with my current problem none of them are generated. I have uploaded the minidump folder on my Onedrive public folder though, but the time stated on it does not seem to match.

    Cheers!

    Sunday, June 29, 2014 12:28 AM
  • You'll need to please share the link.

    More important, when you sayshuts down on its own, does it quite literally shut down as opposed to blue screening? For example, like you were to hold down the power button?

    Regards,

    Patrick

    “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.” - Dalai Lama

    Sunday, June 29, 2014 12:39 AM
  • https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=EF221CBAE3DE180%211850

    Here is the link for the file. 

    And yes, it does seem to shut down as if I were holding the power button

    Sunday, June 29, 2014 10:31 PM
  • With that said, it's either:

    1. Faulty RAM.

    2. Faulty Power Supply (more likely).

    To rule out #1, please run Memtest for NO LESS than ~8 passes (several hours):

    Memtest86+:

    Download Memtest86+ here:

    http://www.memtest.org/

    Which should I download?

    You can either download the pre-compiled ISO that you would burn to a CD and then boot from the CD, or you can download the auto-installer for the USB key. What this will do is format your USB drive, make it a bootable device, and then install the necessary files. Both do the same job, it's just up to you which you choose, or which you have available (whether it's CD or USB).

    Do note that some older generation motherboards do not support USB-based booting, therefore your only option is CD (or Floppy if you really wanted to).

    How Memtest works:

    Memtest86 writes a series of test patterns to most memory addresses, reads back the data written, and compares it for errors.

    The default pass does 9 different tests, varying in access patterns and test data. A tenth test, bit fade, is selectable from the menu. It writes all memory with zeroes, then sleeps for 90 minutes before checking to see if bits have changed (perhaps because of refresh problems). This is repeated with all ones for a total time of 3 hours per pass.

    Many chipsets can report RAM speeds and timings via SPD (Serial Presence Detect) or EPP (Enhanced Performance Profiles), and some even support changing the expected memory speed. If the expected memory speed is overclocked, Memtest86 can test that memory performance is error-free with these faster settings.

    Some hardware is able to report the "PAT status" (PAT: enabled or PAT: disabled). This is a reference to Intel Performance acceleration technology; there may be BIOS settings which affect this aspect of memory timing.

    This information, if available to the program, can be displayed via a menu option.

    Any other questions, they can most likely be answered by reading this great guide here:

    http://forum.canardpc.com/threads/28864-FAQ-please-read-before-posting

    Regards,

    Patrick

    “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.” - Dalai Lama

    • Marked as answer by Michael_LS Tuesday, July 15, 2014 6:27 AM
    Monday, June 30, 2014 12:12 AM
  • Thanks! I will be sure to do that as soon as I can.

    Also, sometimes after the crashes happen and I boot up my computer, a blue screen comes up and says "It looks like Windows didn't load correctly." Does this mean anything?

    Monday, June 30, 2014 11:32 AM
  • My pleasure!

    Are you sure it says that? It may be saying it didn't shut down as expected/shut down unexpectedly, which is the usual error message Windows fires after a blue screen.

    Regards,

    Patrick

    “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.” - Dalai Lama

    Monday, June 30, 2014 11:34 AM
  • Yes, and as soon as that happens, I'll take a picture!
    Tuesday, July 1, 2014 10:37 AM