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Multitude of problems after recent reboot RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

     

    I cannot move, minimize or close a window.  I have performed a full scan in safe mode.  And I have downloaded the Windows Software Removal Tool and run it.  I keep being told I have no malicious software on my computer.  Along with this inability to move, close or minimize my windows, I also get error messages when opening up certain programs, such as Freecell or Itunes.  The windows says: "program".exe is a corrupt file and to run the chkdsk utility.  I have run the chkdsk.exe in a command window and am told I do not have sufficient privileges to run the utility, when I am the only account on this computer and therefore an administator.  Also, when attempting to open the Microsoft Management Console I am informed that my computer 'could not create a blank document'.  All of these problems began after I ran a recent Windows update and had to restart my computer.  I attempted restoring my computer to before I updated and it would not allow me to.  I tried uninstalling these windows updates but I could not remove KB938371.  Any suggestions on what I can do to fix any or all of these problems? 

     

    Thank you in advance,

    Erin

    Sunday, May 4, 2008 5:51 PM

Answers

  • Hi Erin,


    Please run CHKDSK command by following these steps:.


    1. Open the command prompt with administrative privileges by typing cmd in the search box in the Start Menu and right-click cmd.exe in the search results and then select Run as Administrator.


    2. Type chkdsk followed by one or a combination of switches listed below in the command prompt.


    If you run the check disk (chkdsk) command from the command prompt by typing just chkdsk check disk will run in read only mode. All it does is check for errors. It will not fix any errors it finds unless told to do so. This is done by adding switches when typing chkdsk in the command prompt.

     

    A switch looks something like "chkdsk /F". Below is a list of most of the switches used with the check disk command. You can use one or a combination of switches with the check disk command.

     

    D: If you want check disk to scan a drive other than the C: drive, add the drive letter after chkdsk to tell it to scan that drive. If the drive is called X: on your computer it would look like chkdsk X:.

     

    /F: The /F switch is the most common of the chkdsk switches. It tells chkdsk to fix any errors it finds. Chkdsk can’t fix errors on a disk that has open files. If chkdsk asks you if you want to check the drive next time Windows Vista boots or dismount the drive choose to check the drive next time Windows Vista boots. Never choose to dismount the drive. That option should only be used by a professional.

     

    /R: The /R switch tells chkdsk to attempt to recover any bad sectors of the hard drive if any are found. A bad sector is a spot on the hard drive that can’t hold saved data anymore.

     

    /I: The /I switch tells chkdsk to perform a less detailed but faster disk check.

     

    /C: The /C switch tells chkdsk to skip the checking of cycles within a folder structure which reduces the scan time.

     

    An example of an exhaustive disk check using the command line interface is:


    chkdsk D: /F /R


    The check disk command shown above will fix any errors it finds and also attempt to recover bad sectors of the D: drive if any are found.

     

    Hope it helps.

    Wednesday, May 7, 2008 3:01 AM

All replies

  • Hi Erin,

    Do you have any anti-virus solution on this machine? I would strongly suggest running a full system scan after downloading the latest definitions. For the chkdsk utility, did you run this from an elevated command prompt?

     

     

     

    Monday, May 5, 2008 11:08 PM
  • Hi Ashish,

    I do have anti-virus software on my computer - McAfee.  I have run it multiple times on a full scan and it comes up with no problems or errors.  I have also run Windows Defender and it tells me that my computer is running normally and that there are no harmful or malicious software detected. 

    When I run the chkdsk utility as an administrator, I get the following:

    "The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is OS.

    Warning!  F parameter not specified.
    Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

    CHKDSK is verifying files <stage 1 of 3>...
    0 percent complete. <25000 of 386624 file records processed>
    Attribute record <128, ""> from file record segment 25209 is corrupt.
    0 percent complete. <35000 of 386624 file records processed>
    Attribute record <128, ""> from file record segment 37961 is corrupt.

    386624 file records processed.
    File verification completed.
    249 large file records processed.

    Errors found.  CHKDSK cannot continue in read-only mode." 

    I have also attempted opening a command window before windows fully boots in order to run the chkdsk utility, but it does not allow me to. 

    When I open up programs and receive an error it says the following:

    "The file or directory C:\Windows\System32\wbem is corrupt or unreadable.  Please run the Chkdsk utility."

    Does this help?

    Thank you,
    Erin
    Tuesday, May 6, 2008 4:13 AM
  • Hi Erin,


    Please run CHKDSK command by following these steps:.


    1. Open the command prompt with administrative privileges by typing cmd in the search box in the Start Menu and right-click cmd.exe in the search results and then select Run as Administrator.


    2. Type chkdsk followed by one or a combination of switches listed below in the command prompt.


    If you run the check disk (chkdsk) command from the command prompt by typing just chkdsk check disk will run in read only mode. All it does is check for errors. It will not fix any errors it finds unless told to do so. This is done by adding switches when typing chkdsk in the command prompt.

     

    A switch looks something like "chkdsk /F". Below is a list of most of the switches used with the check disk command. You can use one or a combination of switches with the check disk command.

     

    D: If you want check disk to scan a drive other than the C: drive, add the drive letter after chkdsk to tell it to scan that drive. If the drive is called X: on your computer it would look like chkdsk X:.

     

    /F: The /F switch is the most common of the chkdsk switches. It tells chkdsk to fix any errors it finds. Chkdsk can’t fix errors on a disk that has open files. If chkdsk asks you if you want to check the drive next time Windows Vista boots or dismount the drive choose to check the drive next time Windows Vista boots. Never choose to dismount the drive. That option should only be used by a professional.

     

    /R: The /R switch tells chkdsk to attempt to recover any bad sectors of the hard drive if any are found. A bad sector is a spot on the hard drive that can’t hold saved data anymore.

     

    /I: The /I switch tells chkdsk to perform a less detailed but faster disk check.

     

    /C: The /C switch tells chkdsk to skip the checking of cycles within a folder structure which reduces the scan time.

     

    An example of an exhaustive disk check using the command line interface is:


    chkdsk D: /F /R


    The check disk command shown above will fix any errors it finds and also attempt to recover bad sectors of the D: drive if any are found.

     

    Hope it helps.

    Wednesday, May 7, 2008 3:01 AM
  • Hello,

    I performed the chkdsk D: and it told me I had no errors.  When I do both /F and /R it tells me it will check on restart, but then I restart the computer and do not notice any scanning occuring.  Any other suggestions?
    Thursday, May 8, 2008 8:10 PM
  • Hi Erin,

     

    Have you run "chkdsk C: /F /R"? I think it is the Driver C: reported the error. You can try to run the command in safe mode if it cannot run.

     

    Thanks.

    Wednesday, May 14, 2008 12:15 PM