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Recovering from a dual boot lock out RRS feed

  • Question

  • HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I installed Server 2003 on my Vista x64 HP Pavilion laptop.  I thought I followed all of the instructions to the T, but apparently not.
    After creating the dualboot install of Server 2003, when I booted up, the only boot option in the dualboot screen was Server 2003.  I completed the boot, logged onto Server 2003, and could see my Vista files and environment, but most of it was "greyed out" and inaccessable.  I looked for System Recovery, but it was not available.  So I downloaded and installed Recovery Console.  After installing it, I was presented the option to boot off of my C drive (where my Vista is) or the E drive, which is where 2003 is.  I selected the C drive, but the system no longer recognizes my admin password for Vista, which again left me to boot into Server 2003.  I checked to see if my recovery partition still exists, and although the folder is there and it shows ~10.5 MB in filesize in the Properties, the folder appears empty when I try to look in it.  In Safe Mode using the DOS prompt, I cannot get access to any drive by the E drive.
    When I searched for the bootcfg file on my system in Server 2003, it found my Vista bootcfg, and it even tells me that it is a valid bootcfg file, but that it is not acceptable for my "machine." 

    Is there a way to enable my vista x64 bootcfg to load, or to effectively delete the Server 2003 partition/install, without destroying my data files that still are sitting out there on my C drive?
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:34 AM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Tim,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    Let me answer your questions:

     

    1.  If I do what you have suggested, will my data files from my Vista environment remain intact so I can use them?  I don't want to wipe the drive clean and lose them.  Do I need to remove them before doing this?

     

    Yes, all data will remain intact and you do not need to backup them first. If you prefer to backup them, that’s OK. It will only repair your Windows Vista boot manager.

     

    3.  If I understand you directions in step 4 above, I start out in Server 2003 and type the commands at a command prompt that I am running as Administrator.  But just looking at the commands, it is not clear to me how that will restore my boot process back to Vista.  Do you mind elaborating just a little, so I get a better understanding of what is happening as I do these things?

     

    “Drive:\boot\Bootsect.exe /NT60 All” in Step 3 will repair your Windows Vista boot manager. However, your Windows XP entry will be lost. Commands in Step 4 will add the Windows XP entry into the boot manager.

     

    For more information about Bcdedit, please refer to the following article:

     

    BCDEdit Command-Line Options

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667.aspx

     

    4.  Too bad Microsoft does not clearly say that I must load the older version OS then install Vista or else it won't work.  If that information was stated clearly on the download page for Server 2003, I missed it entirely.

     

    Microsoft has published hundreds of Knowledge Base articles for Windows Vista and you can search for them on the following site:

    http://support.microsoft.com/ph/11732#tab2

     

    2.  At the moment I don't have a Vista disk.  The machine came with a restore partition installed from HP, and I never created any rescue disks.  So, if I can't locate someone with a Vista disk to use, then I will have to pay HP for a copy that will restore my PC back to the way it was when I bought it.  However, HP has already told me that it will reformat my hard drive and wipe all my data files. 

     

    Since you do not have a Windows Vista disk, you may need to try the following method to resolve this issue:

     

    1)   Boot into Windows XP.

     

    2)   Download and install .Net Framework 2.0 from the following site:

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=0856eacb-4362-4b0d-8edd-aab15c5e04f5&displaylang=en

     

    3)   Download and install VistaBootPRO from the following site:

    http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/OS-Enhancements/VistaBootPRO.shtml

     

    4)   Open VistaBootPRO and click the “System Bootloader” button.

     

    5)   Choose “Windows Vista Bootloader” under “Choose a System Bootloader to install:”, choose “System Partition” under “System Bootloader Install Options” and then click the “Install Bootloader” button.

     

    6)   Click Diagnostic and click “Run Diagnostics  Alt+R”.

     

    7)   Highlight “Earlier Version of Windows” in the “Select an entry to enable options below:” box and rename it to “Microsoft Windows Server 2003” in the “Rename OS Entry” line and click the “Apply Updates” button.

     

    Note: you can also change other settings such as the default OS entry and boot timeout on this page.

     

    8)   Restart the computer and now you will see the “Microsoft Windows Vista” and “Microsoft Windows Server 2003” entries on the boot menu. Enjoy it!

     

    If anything is unclear, please let me know.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

    Thursday, February 26, 2009 7:00 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  •  

    Hi,

     

    Please understand that Windows Vista and Windows Server 2003 uses different startup files. If you would like to configure a Windows Server 2003/Vista system, you should install Windows Server 2003 first and then install Windows Vista. If Windows Server 2003 is installed after you install Windows Vista, it is expected that Windows Vista cannot boot as the boot manager of Windows Vista is damaged.

     

    Now, to fix the boot manager of Windows Vista, you can try the following method:

     

    1. In Windows Server 2003, insert the Vista disk into DVD-ROM.

    2. Click Start, click Accessories, right-click the command-prompt shortcut, and then click Run as Administrator.

    3. Type the following command at a command prompt and press Enter:

     

    Drive:\boot\Bootsect.exe /NT60 All

     

    In this command, Drive is the drive where the Windows Vista installation media is located.

     

    Note: The boot folder for this step is on the DVD drive.

     

    4. type the following commands at a command prompt and press Enter.

     

    Note: In the commands below, Drive is the drive where Windows Vista is installed.

     

    Drive:\Windows\system32\Bcdedit /create {ntldr} /d "Windows Server 2003"

    Drive:\Windows\system32\Bcdedit /set {ntldr} device partition=e: 

    Drive:\Windows\system32\Bcdedit /set {ntldr} path \ntldr

    Drive:\Windows\system32\Bcdedit /displayorder {ntldr} /addlast

     

    5. Restart the computer.

     

    For more information, please refer to the following article:

     

    Windows Vista no longer starts after you install an earlier version of the Windows operating system in a dual-boot configuration

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/919529/en-us

     

    Hope it helps.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:59 AM
    Moderator
  • Tim - First, thanks for responding to me.  I appreciate you taking the time to help me.

    Before I do anything else, I want to ensure that I don't complicate my existing problems.  I have a few questions, hopefully they make sense and you have answers.

    1.  If I do what you have suggested, will my data files from my Vista environment remain intact so I can use them?  I don't want to wipe the drive clean and lose them.  Do I need to remove them before doing this?
    2.  At the moment I don't have a Vista disk.  The machine came with a restore partition installed from HP, and I never created any rescue disks.  So, if I can't locate someone with a Vista disk to use, then I will have to pay HP for a copy that will restore my PC back to the way it was when I bought it.  However, HP has already told me that it will reformat my hard drive and wipe all my data files. 
    3.  If I understand you directions in step 4 above, I start out in Server 2003 and type the commands at a command prompt that I am running as Administrator.  But just looking at the commands, it is not clear to me how that will restore my boot process back to Vista.  Do you mind elaborating just a little, so I get a better understanding of what is happening as I do these things?
    4.  Too bad Microsoft does not clearly say that I must load the older version OS then install Vista or else it won't work.  If that information was stated clearly on the download page for Server 2003, I missed it entirely.

    Look forward to hearing back from you.  And again, I appreciate your time and willingness to help.

    Tim Hanson
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:52 PM
  •  

    Hi Tim,

     

    Thank you for the reply.

     

    Let me answer your questions:

     

    1.  If I do what you have suggested, will my data files from my Vista environment remain intact so I can use them?  I don't want to wipe the drive clean and lose them.  Do I need to remove them before doing this?

     

    Yes, all data will remain intact and you do not need to backup them first. If you prefer to backup them, that’s OK. It will only repair your Windows Vista boot manager.

     

    3.  If I understand you directions in step 4 above, I start out in Server 2003 and type the commands at a command prompt that I am running as Administrator.  But just looking at the commands, it is not clear to me how that will restore my boot process back to Vista.  Do you mind elaborating just a little, so I get a better understanding of what is happening as I do these things?

     

    “Drive:\boot\Bootsect.exe /NT60 All” in Step 3 will repair your Windows Vista boot manager. However, your Windows XP entry will be lost. Commands in Step 4 will add the Windows XP entry into the boot manager.

     

    For more information about Bcdedit, please refer to the following article:

     

    BCDEdit Command-Line Options

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709667.aspx

     

    4.  Too bad Microsoft does not clearly say that I must load the older version OS then install Vista or else it won't work.  If that information was stated clearly on the download page for Server 2003, I missed it entirely.

     

    Microsoft has published hundreds of Knowledge Base articles for Windows Vista and you can search for them on the following site:

    http://support.microsoft.com/ph/11732#tab2

     

    2.  At the moment I don't have a Vista disk.  The machine came with a restore partition installed from HP, and I never created any rescue disks.  So, if I can't locate someone with a Vista disk to use, then I will have to pay HP for a copy that will restore my PC back to the way it was when I bought it.  However, HP has already told me that it will reformat my hard drive and wipe all my data files. 

     

    Since you do not have a Windows Vista disk, you may need to try the following method to resolve this issue:

     

    1)   Boot into Windows XP.

     

    2)   Download and install .Net Framework 2.0 from the following site:

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=0856eacb-4362-4b0d-8edd-aab15c5e04f5&displaylang=en

     

    3)   Download and install VistaBootPRO from the following site:

    http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/OS-Enhancements/VistaBootPRO.shtml

     

    4)   Open VistaBootPRO and click the “System Bootloader” button.

     

    5)   Choose “Windows Vista Bootloader” under “Choose a System Bootloader to install:”, choose “System Partition” under “System Bootloader Install Options” and then click the “Install Bootloader” button.

     

    6)   Click Diagnostic and click “Run Diagnostics  Alt+R”.

     

    7)   Highlight “Earlier Version of Windows” in the “Select an entry to enable options below:” box and rename it to “Microsoft Windows Server 2003” in the “Rename OS Entry” line and click the “Apply Updates” button.

     

    Note: you can also change other settings such as the default OS entry and boot timeout on this page.

     

    8)   Restart the computer and now you will see the “Microsoft Windows Vista” and “Microsoft Windows Server 2003” entries on the boot menu. Enjoy it!

     

    If anything is unclear, please let me know.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

    Thursday, February 26, 2009 7:00 AM
    Moderator