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Windows Vista FAQ 1 (Installation) RRS feed

  • General discussion

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    Hi All,

    This thread is a summary of the Frequently Asked Questions on Winodws Vista. We consolidate them and post here for your reference. If you have any further questions, please kindly start
    a new thread in the corresponding forum so that more community members, MVPs, and MSFTs can join the discussion. Thanks for your understanding.

    Part 1: Common Installation Topics:

    1. I installed Windows XP on Drive C and installed Windows Vista on Drive D. Why the Windows Vista drive is recognized as Drive C?
    2. Will I ever need to re-activate my current copy of Windows after some changes?
    3. Can I dual-boot Windows XP and Windows Vista?
    4. Can I upgrade from a 32bit version of Windows Vista to 64bit version of Windows Vista?
    5. Can I use Windows System Image Manager to create unattend files for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003?
    6. Is Windows Vista hardware abstraction layer (HAL) independent?
    7. What systems does Microsoft Deployment Toolkit support to unattend install?
    8. What tools are used in the Microsoft Deployment accelerator for imaging?
    9. Why does the Deployment Workbench show version 4.1 after installing MDT 2008 Update 1?
    10. How can I get Microsoft Deployment Toolkit and Windows Automatic Installation Kit?
    11. How to remove the Windows.old folder that is generated when you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista
    12. How to retrieve files from an earlier version of Windows in Windows Vista?
    13. Windows Vista no longer starts after you install an earlier version of the Windows operating system in a dual-boot configuration
    14. After installing Windows Vista, the built-in administrator account cannot be found.
    15. After upgrading to Windows Vista, it prompts you to choose Windows on the boot menu.
    16. Error message when you try to upgrade Windows Vista to a more advanced version of Windows Vista: "Windows could not configure one or more system components To install Windows, restart the computer and then restart the installation"
    17. Cannot upgrade install Windows Vista
    18. Error message when you try to capture a source volume by using ImageX.exe in Windows Vista: "The system cannot find the file specified."
    19. Error message when you use the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup component to install Windows Vista on a computer: "Windows could not parse or process unattend answer file"

    Part 2: WDS related Topics:

    20. Computer loads the boot image, but it cannot access an install image.
    21. Install images do not appear on the image selection page.
    22. X64-based client computer does not have any x64-based images on the boot image selection page.
    23. When using Image Capture Wizard to create a custom image, the volume that contains my image is not selectable.

    PLEASE NOTE: Microsoft does not offer formal support for the communities you'll find here. Instead, our role is to provide a platform for people who want to take advantage of the global community of Microsoft customers and product experts. Microsoft may monitor content to ensure the accuracy of the information you'll find, but any information provided by Microsoft staff is offered "AS IS" with no warranties, and no rights are conferred. You assume all risk for your use.

     

    1. I installed Windows XP on Drive C and installed Windows Vista on Drive D. Why the Windows Vista drive is recognized as Drive C? Will I ever need to activate my current copy of Windows again?

    Answer:

    When you logon Windows Vista, the current Windows Vista partition will be always recognized as Drive C even if it was installed on Drive D. However, when you logon Windows XP, the Windows XP partition is shown as Drive C and the Windows Vista partition is shown as Drive D.

     

    2. Will I ever need to re-activate my current copy of Windows after some changes?

    Answer:

    Maybe. You might have to activate Windows again if:

    • You uninstall Windows on one computer and install it on another. During installation, enter the product key that came with your copy of Windows. If automatic activation fails, follow the instructions that walk you through activating Windows by phone. You will have 30 days to activate your copy of Windows.

    • You make a significant hardware change to your computer, such as upgrading the hard disk and memory at the same time. If a major hardware change requires activating Windows again, you will be notified and will have three days to activate your copy of Windows.

    • You reformat your hard disk. Reformatting erases your activation status. In this case, you’ll have 30 days to activate Windows again.

    • A virus infects your computer and deletes your activation status.

    If you have to activate Windows again, you don't need to buy a new product key.

    To activate Windows on this computer, do the following:

    Open Windows Activation by clicking the Start button, clicking Computer, clicking Properties, and then clicking Click here to activate Windows now.‌ If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

     

    3. Can I dual-boot Windows XP and Windows Vista?

    Answer:

    Yes, you can install Windows Vista on a computer that’s already running Windows XP in a dual-boot configuration. You must install each operating system on its own partition.

    When you install the new version of Windows, you can keep an older version of Windows on your computer. This is often called a multi-boot or dual-boot configuration.

    Before you begin: Make sure that your hard disk has a separate partition for each operating system that you want to install, or that your computer has multiple hard disks. Otherwise, you will either have to reformat and repartition your hard disk or install the new operating system on a separate hard disk. Also, make sure that the partition or disk where you plan to install the new version of Windows is formatted with the NTFS file system.

    Important Reformatting and repartitioning your hard disk deletes all information on that disk. If you are running a previous version of Windows and want to partition your hard disk without reformatting it, use disk partitioning software, which is available from various manufacturers. Some disk partitioning software allows you to keep your information. Before installing Windows, be sure to disable all antivirus software and back up your files to an external hard disk, a CD or DVD, a USB flash drive, or a network folder.

    1.  Turn on the computer running your current edition of Windows, and then insert the installation disc into the computer's CD or DVD drive.

    2.  On the Install Windows menu, click Install now.

    3.  On the Get important updates for installation page, we recommend getting the latest updates to help ensure a successful installation and to help protect your computer against security threats. You must be connected to the Internet to receive installation updates. This page might not appear if your computer is not connected to the Internet.

    4.  On the Type your product key for activation page, we strongly recommend that you type your 25-character product key to help avoid problems during activation.

    5.  On the Please read the license terms page, if you accept the license terms, click I accept the license terms.

    6.  On the Which type of installation do you want? page, click Custom.

    7.  On the Where do you want to install Windows page, select the partition or disk where you want to install the new Windows operating system.

    8.  Click Next to begin the installation. You might see a compatibility report.

    Notes

    1. To set up a multiboot configuration on a computer that does not yet have an operating system, partition the hard disk so each operating system you want to install has a partition, and begin by installing the oldest operating system first.
    2. Any programs and drivers that you want to use must be installed on each operating system that you want to use them in.

     

    4. Can I upgrade from a 32bit version of Windows Vista to 64bit version of Windows Vista?

    Answer:

    No. If you are currently running a 32-bit version of Windows, you can only perform an upgrade to another 32-bit version of Windows. Similarly, if you are running a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, you can only perform an upgrade to another 64-bit version of Windows Vista.

    If you want to move from a 32-bit version of Windows to a 64-bit version of Windows Vista, back up your files and perform a clean installation of the 64-bit version of Windows Vista.

    5. Can I use Windows System Image Manager to create unattend files for Windows XP or Windows Server 2003?

    Answer:

    WSIM is really only applicable to Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 deployment.

    In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, the unattended installation process was automated by multiple text-based answer files, such as Unattend.txt and Winbom.ini. These answer files enabled automation during different times of Windows Setup and deployment. Because some unattended Setup settings were valid during more than one pass, there was significant duplication between the files, particularly in Unattend.txt and Sysprep.inf.

    In Windows Vista, the unattended installation process uses a single XML-based answer file (Unattend.xml) at different times during Windows Setup and deployment. There are several different stages of the setup and deployment process that are referred to as configuration passes. Unattended Setup settings can be applied in one or more configuration passes during Windows Setup. Unattend.xml mimics the previous implementation of multiple unattended Setup files.

    6. Is Windows Vista hardware abstraction layer (HAL) independent?

    Answer:

    HAL is Microsoft's abbreviation for the Hardware Abstraction Layer, the technology and drivers that let the Windows 2000, XP and 2003 operating systems communicate with your PC's hardware. We can only deploy a Windows 2000, XP or 2003 image to a computer in the same type of HAL as the computer we captured the image from. If you would like to deploy Windows 2000, XP or 2003 to computers in more than 2 types of HALs, you need to create a separate image for each type of HAL. However, Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 do not require a separate image for each type of HAL.

    7. What systems does Microsoft Deployment Toolkit support to unattended install?

    Answer:

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit deploys Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP and Windows Vista.

    8. What tools are used in the Microsoft Deployment accelerator for imaging?

    Answer:

    Microsoft Deployment delivers a feature-rich MMC console, Deployment Workbench, which is built on Windows Vista and Windows Server deployment tools including: ImageX, Windows System Image Manager, Windows PE 2.1, and Windows Deployment Services. Microsoft Deployment also uses Configuration Manager 2007’s stand-alone media initiated operating system deployment feature as well as System Management Server 2003 OS Deployment Feature Pack OS Image package contents and image management.

    9. Why does the Deployment Workbench show version 4.1 after installing MDT 2008 Update 1?

    Answer:

    The reason why Microsoft Deployment Workbench shows Version 4.1 is due to caching that can occur with certain DLL's. If you previously had MDT 2008 installed, the version was cached and unfortunately does not update properly after the installation of MDT 2008 Update 1.

    To update the version number, you can delete the following registry entry and then it will update with the correct version number.

    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\MuiCache\@C:\Program Files\Microsoft Deployment Toolkit\Bin\Microsoft.BDD.WorkbenchResources.dll,-105

    10. How can I get Microsoft Deployment Toolkit and Windows Automatic Installation Kit?

    Answer:

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit and Windows Automatic Installation Kit are free deployment tools provided by Microsoft. They can be downloaded from the following links:

    Microsoft Deployment Toolkit
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=3bd8561f-77ac-4400-a0c1-fe871c461a89&DisplayLang=en

    Windows Automatic Installation Kit:
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=94BB6E34-D890-4932-81A5-5B50C657DE08&displaylang=en

     

    11. How to remove the Windows.old folder that is generated when you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista

    Answer:

    To remove the Windows.old folder, follow these steps.

    Important Before you remove the Windows.old folder, make sure that there are no important files in it.

    1. Click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, and then click System Tools.
    2. Click Disk Cleanup.
    3. In the Disk Cleanup Options dialog box, click Files from all users on this computer.

    Note If the User Account Control dialog box appears, type the administrator password, and then click OK. Otherwise, click Continue.

    1. In the Disk Cleanup:Drive Selection dialog box, select the hard disk drive that you want to clean up, and then click OK. Wait while the system scans the computer for unnecessary files.
    2. Click the Disk Cleanup tab, and then look for the Previous Windows installations check box.
    3. If you find the Previous Windows installations check box, click to select it, and then click OK. If you do not find this check box, go to step 7.
    4. When you are prompted to confirm the removal of files, click Delete Files.
    5. Wait while the system removes the files. You have now removed the Windows.old folder.

     

    12. How to retrieve files from an earlier version of Windows in Windows Vista?

    Answer:

    When you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista, files that were used in the earlier version of Windows are stored in the Windows.old folder. The Windows.old folder is generated when you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista.

    The Windows.old folder is generated if the following conditions are true:

    1. You install Windows Vista on a computer on which Microsoft Windows XP or Microsoft Windows 2000 is installed.
    2. You perform a custom installation of Windows Vista instead of an upgrade installation.
    3. You install Windows Vista on the drive on which Windows XP or Windows 2000 is installed.

    The Windows.old folder contains the following folders:

    Windows
    "Documents and Settings"
    "Program Files"

    The Windows folder mainly stores programs and files that are required to run the earlier version of Windows.

    The "Documents and Settings" folder mainly stores the "My Documents" folder and the Favorites folder. Additionally, the "Documents and Settings" folder stores the desktop files that were used by the earlier version of Windows.

    The "Program Files" folder mainly stores the programs that were installed on the earlier version of Windows. To use these programs in Windows Vista, you must reinstall these programs in Windows Vista. Before you do this, verify that the programs are compatible with Windows Vista. Before you do this, verify that the programs are compatible with Windows Vista. For more information, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    How to troubleshoot program compatibility issues in Windows Vista
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927386

    Note The folders that are stored in the Windows.old folder contain some files that you used in the earlier version of Windows. The type of files that are stored depends on the computer that you use. We recommend that you always back up any important files before you install Windows Vista.

    To retrieve files from an earlier version of Windows in Windows Vista, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, type %systemdrive%\Windows.old in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER.
    2. Retrieve the files from the Windows.old folder. For more information about how to do this, click the following article numbers to view the articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

    How to restore your personal files after you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/932912

    How to move Internet Explorer favorites from an earlier version of Windows to the Internet Explorer Favorites folder in Windows Vista
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/933210

    How to move or to copy music files from the Windows.old folder in Windows Vista
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/933211

    13. Windows Vista no longer starts after you install an earlier version of the Windows operating system in a dual-boot configuration

    Symptom:

    Windows Vista no longer starts after you install an earlier version of the Windows operating system on a Windows Vista-based computer in a dual-boot configuration. Additionally, you may receive the following error message when you try to start Windows Vista:

    Disk read error has occurred.

    Cause:

    These issues occur because earlier versions of the Windows operating system are incompatible with the new Windows Vista startup method. Windows Vista uses a new Boot Configuration Database (BCD) store. This store contains a boot menu and all the information about operating systems that are installed on the computer. Therefore, a Boot.ini file that is from an earlier version of the Windows operating system cannot be used to start Windows Vista.

    Resolution:

    To resolve this problem, follow these steps to configure the hard disk partition on which Windows Vista is installed.

    Step 1: Insert the Windows Vista installation disc in a drive, and then open a command prompt

    a.  Insert the Windows Vista installation disc in the computer's CD or DVD drive. 
    b.  Click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, and then click Command Prompt

    Step 2: Use the Bcdedit tool to configure the hard disk partition on which Windows Vista is installed

    a.  At the command prompt, type cd %windir%. Note the drive letter that is displayed at the command prompt. This drive letter indicates which drive is associated with the active partition on the hard disk. Typically, this is the C drive. 
    b.  Type Drive :\boot\Bootsect.exe –NT60 All, and then press ENTER.

    Note Drive is the drive in which the Windows Vista installation media is located. Typically, this is the computer's DVD drive (the E drive).

    c.  Type %windir%\system32\Bcdedit –create {ntldr} –d "Description for earlier Windows version", and then press ENTER.

    Note Description for earlier Windows version can be any text that you want. For example, it can be "Windows XP." 

    d.  Type %windir%\system32\Bcdedit –set {ntldr} device partition=x:, and then press ENTER.

    Note x is the drive letter of the active partition that you identified in step 2a. 

    e.  Type %windir%\system32\Bcdedit –set {ntldr} path \ntldr, and then press ENTER. 
    f.  Type %windir%\system32\Bcdedit –displayorder {ntldr} –addlast, and then press ENTER. 
    g.  Restart the computer. 

     

    14. After installing Windows Vista, the built-in administrator account cannot be found.

    Symptom:

    The built-in administrator account cannot be found after installing Windows Vista.

    Cause:

    The built-in administrator account is disabled by default in Windows Vista on new installations.

    Resolution:

    Method 1:

    1. Click Start, All Programs, Accessories and right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as administrator.
    2. Type the following command and press enter:

    net user administrator /active:yes

    Method 2:

    1. Right-click Computer and click Manage.
    2. Double-click Local Users and Groups and then click Users.
    3. Right-click the Administrator account and select Properties.
    4. On the General tab, clear the Account is Disabled check box and click OK.

     

    15. After upgrading to Windows Vista, it prompts you to choose Windows on the boot menu.

    Symptom:

    If you upgrade to Windows Vista from a previous system, a legacy operating system entry will appear on the boot menu. However, when you choose to enter this entry, nothing happens.

    Cause:

    The boot menu haven’t upgraded fully.

    Resolution:

    To remove this legacy operating system entry, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, All Programs, Accessories and right-click on Command Prompt and select Run as administrator.
    2. Type the following command and press enter (Include the brackets around ntldr):

    bcdedit /delete {ntldr} -f

    You can also use a program called VistaBootPRO to modify the boot option.

    16. Error message when you try to upgrade Windows Vista to a more advanced version of Windows Vista: "Windows could not configure one or more system components To install Windows, restart the computer and then restart the installation"

    Symptom:

    When you try to upgrade Windows Vista to a more advanced version of Windows Vista, you may receive the following error message:

    Windows could not configure one or more system components. To install Windows, restart the computer and then restart the installation.

    For example, you may receive this error message when you try to upgrade Windows Vista Home Basic to Windows Vista Ultimate.

    Cause:

    This problem occurs because some features of Windows Vista cannot be migrated to the upgraded version of Windows Vista.

    Resolution:

    To resolve this problem, follow these steps:

    1. Click Start, type Programs and Features in the Start Search box, and then click Programs and Features in the Programs list.
    2. Under Tasks, click Turn Windows features on or off.

    If you are prompted for an administrator password, type the password. If you are prompted for confirmation, click Continue.

    3. Click to clear the check boxes of the following features:

    Microsoft .NET Framework 3.0\XPS Viewer
    Remote Differential Compression
    Window DFS Replication Service

    4. Upgrade Windows Vista to a more advanced version, and then click to select the check boxes that you clicked to clear in step 3.

    17. Cannot upgrade install Windows Vista

    Symptom:

    When prompted for the type of installation the upgrade option is grayed out.
    The following message is displayed:

    “Upgrade has been disabled”.

    Cause:

    Any of the following could contribute to this issue:

    No operating system is currently installed.
    You booted from the Windows Vista media.
    You are upgrading a legacy OS installed on a FAT32 Volume.
    The installed operating system does not support an upgrade to Windows Vista.
    You are upgrading from a legacy OS of a different locale (language).
    You launched setup from Safe Mode in the legacy OS.
    The legacy OS does not meet the software update requirements: Service Pack 2 for Windows XP.

    Resolution:

    To resolve these issues, check for the potential causes listed above, and then perform the relevant resolution from the following list:

    Start setup within a valid legacy OS.
    Convert current file system to NTFS.
    Clean install.

     

    18. Error message when you try to capture a source volume by using ImageX.exe in Windows Vista: "The system cannot find the file specified."

    Symptoms:

    When you try to capture a source volume by using the ImageX.exe tool, you may receive an error message that resembles the following:

    The system cannot find the file specified.
    This problem only occurs when the destination folder for the capture is a network folder.

    Cause:

    This problem may occur if the source volume that you try to capture has insufficient free disk space. This problem occurs even if the network share has ample disk space.

    Workaround:

    To work around this problem, free disk space on the source volume. Alternatively, use a larger source volume.

    19. Error message when you use the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup component to install Windows Vista on a computer: "Windows could not parse or process unattend answer file"

    Symptoms:

    Consider the following scenario:

    1. You use the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup component to install Windows Vista on a computer.
    2. The version of Windows Vista that you want to install does not include the Media Center component.
    3. In an unattended XML file, you specify use of the ShowMediaCenter child element to hide the Media Center component in the WindowsFeatures element.

    In this scenario, the installation of Windows Vista fails. Additionally, you receive the following error message:

    Windows could not parse or process unattend answer file [C:\windows\Panther\unattend.xml] for pass [oobesystem]. The settings specified in the answer file cannot be applied. The error was detected while processing settings for component [Microsoft - Windows - Shell -Setup]

    Cause:

    This problem occurs because the Media Center component that was hidden by using the WindowsFeatures element is not included in the version of Windows Vista that you try to install.

    Resolution:

    Do not use the WindowsFeatures element to hide the Media Center component if the component does not exist in the version of Windows Vista that you want to install.

     

    20. Computer loads the boot image, but it cannot access an install image.

    Answer:

    The boot image may not contain the correct network driver for the client computer.

    To resolve this, on the client computer, press SHIFT+F10 to open a command prompt and run ipconfig. If IP address and subnet mask are not reported in the output, this indicates that networking has not been applied and this is likely that a network driver is not present. To fix this, add the driver from the hardware manufacturer to the image by using the tools in the Windows AIK.

     

    21. Install images do not appear on the image selection page.

    Answer:

    The most common causes of this problem are:

    1. The account whose credentials were entered on the credential screen of Windows Deployment Services client does not have permissions to read the install .wim file. These images are located at \\<WDSServer>\RemoteInstall\Images\<Image Group>.
    2. The architecture of the client computer (x86, Itanium, x64) does not match the architecture type of the install image. A client booting into an x86-based boot image will only be able to view x86-based install images on the image selection page.
    3. You may have an incompatible hardware abstraction layer (HAL) type. To deploy an image to this computer, you will need an image that has the correct HAL type — that is, an image that was captured from a computer that has the same HAL type as this computer.

     

    22. X64-based client computer does not have any x64-based images on the boot image selection page.

    Answer:

    Many x64-based system BIOSes do not accurately identify the computer as x64 during the boot process. If Windows Deployment Services does not recognize the computer as x64, only x86 images will be shown. Run WDSUTIL /set-server /architecturediscovery:yes to force the Windows Deployment Services server to recognize x64 computers.

     

    23. When using Image Capture Wizard to create a custom image, the volume that contains my image is not selectable.

    Answer:

    There are two common causes for this problem:

    Possible Cause 1: The boot image does not contain the proper drivers for the computer’s hard disk drive controller. To troubleshoot this, when the Image Capture Wizard first starts, press SHIFT+F10 to open a command prompt. Run Diskpart, and then run lis disk. Select each disk (for example, sel dis 0 and sel dis 1), and then type lis vol to list each volume. Ensure that the volume that contains the offline Sysprep image is visible. If it is not, you need to add the driver for your mass-storage controller to Windows PE so that it can detect the local disk that contains the offline Sysprep image. To do this, use one of the following procedures:

    To inject drivers into a boot image, and use the boot image to create a capture image:

    1. Add a boot image to your server.
    2. Mark the image as offline (disabled).
    3. Mount the image by using ImageX and Mountrw (included in the Windows AIK).
    4. Insert all of the drivers that use PEIMG.exe into the boot image.
    5. Mark the image as online (enabled).
    6. Create the capture image using this boot image.

    To load the driver yourself in Windows PE:

    1. Boot into the capture image.
    2. Press SHIFT+F10 to access a command prompt.
    3. Use Drvload.exe to load the driver.
    4. Confirm that you have access to the local disk that contains the offline image.
    5. Press ALT+TAB to return to the capture wizard and continue the process.

    Possible Cause 2: The volume does not contain an image that was prepared using Sysprep. To determine whether the offline image has been prepared using Sysprep:

    1. Run regedit to load the offline system hive.
    2. In HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System, create a new key called Test.
    3. Import the offline system hive from C:\windows\system32\config\system (assuming the offline operating system is located on C:\) into the empty Test key.
    4. Examine the two registry keys in the imported system hive that are checked by the wizard:
    • Ensure that HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\Setup\CloneTag exists
    • Ensure that HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\Setup\SystemSetupInProgress is set to 1.

    If either of the registry keys are not set correctly, there are two likely causes:

    1. The Generalize check box was not selected when Sysprepwas run.
    2. After Sysprep completed, the computer is specialized before the Image Capture Wizard is started. This can happen if you installed Windows Vista, ran Sysprep, rebooted the computer, and then failed to signal the PXE boot in time so that the computer starts to boot and the specialization process runs. You realized your mistake, restarted the computer, and signaled the PXE boot. Then you booted into Windows PE and start the image capture wizard. In this scenario, the wizard will not show the volume because the offline image is no longer generalized.

    To resolve either of these, boot into the image, run Sysprep again, and then perform the capture process again.

     


    Microsoft Online Community Support
    Friday, April 24, 2009 10:09 AM
    Moderator