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Why 32 bit & Why 64 bit? RRS feed

  • Question

  • For goodness sake some specialist from Microsoft please explain to me.  My question is from Microsoft technical team.

    Please explain in detail to me why should I choose 64 bit Windows in my purchase?  I want to purchase Vista Ultimate.

    What kind of software or games can I run on Windows 64 bit? Can I run my existing 32 bit software and games on 64 bit Windows? What are the complete differences between 32bit Windows and 64bit Windows?

    Please some expert from Microsoft technical team explain this to me very clearly.

    I really appreciate your kindness in taking time to really help me on this really difficult choice.

    Thanks

    Please send your replies to my email.  sasansolar@hotmail.com (please no spam)

    Thursday, December 18, 2008 8:35 AM

All replies

  • I use Vista 64 bits for more than one year now

    95% of 32 bits application i used worked fine with Vista 64 bits

    I choosed 64bits because I already got 4GB memory and i m sure it will become 6-8 GB in 2 years. With 32 bits you cannot pass the 3.2 GB limit.

    MVP Setup and Deployment - http://www.forum-microsoft.org
    Thursday, December 18, 2008 10:08 AM
  • Simba2008 said:
    What kind of software or games can I run on Windows 64 bit? Can I run my existing 32 bit software and games on 64 bit Windows? What are the complete differences between 32bit Windows and 64bit Windows?

    Most 32-bit apps will run under a 64-bit version of Vista, in an emulation layer (called Windows on Windows.)
    However, support for any legacy 16-bit apps that you might have is gone.
    There are other notable differences (mainly, things that x64 has, that x86 does not); there's a good article here that highlights them.

    Simba2008 said:

    Please send your replies to my email.  sasansolar@hotmail.com (please no spam)

    First, we try very much to not give replies via email, for several reasons:
    - the community as a whole cannot participate in a discussion, when said discussion is held entirely (aside from the first post) in email, because no one else knows what was said.  This very much limits you, the original poster, in your search for knowledge.
    - community research.  If all replies were sent via email (rather than the forums), no one would be able to learn (and, possibly, not create a thread in the first place) from the forums.  This way, they're a great research tool.

    And, if you want no spam, you'll need to take down the email address entirely, or munge it better (e.g. @domain.nospam.com, or "me at domain dot com"  ;)

    HTH,
    Chris




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    Friday, December 19, 2008 2:53 AM
  • In Windows Server 2008 you can, why the Standard version doesn't have 8GB available is beyond me when "adoption" is such a buzz-word these days.
    Friday, December 19, 2008 3:53 AM
  • @ incognite:
    ?????
    Wrong thread, perhaps?  ;)
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    Friday, December 19, 2008 1:12 PM
  • No it's related
    Saturday, December 20, 2008 2:45 AM
  • @ incognite:  OK.  After re-reading the entire thread about three times (incognite, it helps, usually, if you quote (even partly) what you're directly replying to), I figured out that you're referring to RAM limitations on a 32-bit (consumer) version of Windows, yes?
    There's a reason for that:
    PAE (the trick that gets you increased RAM address space) is, to be blunt, a slightly hackish sleight-of-hand trick.  It does work, yes; however, it also requires PAE-aware drivers to guarantee a crash-free computing experience.
    Since most desktop-hardware vendors don't chose to write PAE-aware drivers (I'm thinking that lack of mainstream demand had a lot to do with that decision), and a driver that isn't so written will, eventually, crash (due to it being pointed at a memory address that it thinks could not possibly exist), MS (some time ago, predating Vista) decided to dump PAE in desktop versions of Windows.
    IMHO, it was a good decision - it reduces their support cost, by eliminating a failure point that would be (nearly always) caused by outside manufacturers.

    Server OS'es are a different beast.  Stability is valued over performance, and there is a real, widespread want/need for PAE in serverland.  (also, money talks.  serverland is a more spendy place. :)  )
    And, this:
    "why the Standard version doesn't have 8GB available is beyond me" I explain as 'it's the base model.'  ;)
    They chose to not enable PAE support there, for, most likely, more marketing than technical reasons.  It's one of those things that helps to justify the price spread.

    Just my $0.02,
    Chris
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    • Edited by Chris Cupler Saturday, December 20, 2008 4:21 AM clarification
    Saturday, December 20, 2008 4:19 AM
  • Hi Chris,

    Thanks for that discussion, you should be a Mod as I've not been able to get such a direct answer to this question.

    I understand now why PAE isn't enabled in the consumer 32 bit Microsoft OS's but I still think it should be enabled in the Server variety and you are most likely correct in saying that it is less of a technical concern and more a marketing thing, however how is ongoing development of Legacy systems supposed to be undertaken with the current situation in force, or are we all expected to to upgrade at some explicit point in time?

    Regards

    Saturday, December 20, 2008 1:45 PM