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Experiences with Part-time employees and Timesheets with minimum hours required RRS feed

  • Question

  • Has anyone encountered situations where Timesheets are configured with the minimum number of hours entered being required conflicting with resources who work part time and whose contracted hours of work are less than the required minimum for timesheet submission?

    I have been mulling this one over and think a fix would be to have an Administrative line item for part time non working time that does not require approval. I tested this and it seems to work when entering "actual" work in the timephased element of the timesheet. It seems a bit counter-intuitive to book actual time that is not contractually worked but it is a fix. 

    I also encountered an issue with entering planned non-working time that needs to be approved - this did not count as any recorded hours whatsoever so can provoke a situation where people booking planned time off in the future, which is great for reflecting depleted resource availability in the Enterprise Resource Pool, is blocked from being submitted due to minimum time reporting policies. Entering Actual hours against Vacation appears to work but is again slightly counter-intuitive.


    Dominic Moss | MAPM Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist | Our Newsletter: PM News Project Server Specialists Project Server PRIME | Twitter: @Twitter | Facebook: @Facebook | Linkedin: Wellingtone

    Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:13 AM

Answers

  • Dominic --

    This is a class example where the real world conflicts with the setting in Project Server.  You cannot set the Minimum Hours of Work value to 8 hours if you have part-time employees.  In this case, I would recommend you set the value to 0h and then enforce the requirement through a methodology or process.  Tell full-time workers that they are expected to enter a minimum of 8 hours per day in their timesheet, and tell part-time workers they are expected to enter a minimum number of hours based on whether they work a 2, 4, or 6 hour work day.  Just a thought.  Perhaps the others will have some ideas for you as well.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    • Marked as answer by Dominic Moss Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:11 PM
    Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:43 AM
    Moderator
  • Dominic:

    Don't use the minimum time setting. Use reporting to enforce these policies. Make it a training and compliance issue rather than using Project Server as the enforcer. A good public flogging will quickly bring the non-compliant users into line. :)


    Gary Chefetz, MCITP, MCP, MVP msProjectExperts
    Project and Project ServerFAQs
    Project Server Help BLOG

    • Marked as answer by Dominic Moss Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:11 PM
    Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:32 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Dominic --

    This is a class example where the real world conflicts with the setting in Project Server.  You cannot set the Minimum Hours of Work value to 8 hours if you have part-time employees.  In this case, I would recommend you set the value to 0h and then enforce the requirement through a methodology or process.  Tell full-time workers that they are expected to enter a minimum of 8 hours per day in their timesheet, and tell part-time workers they are expected to enter a minimum number of hours based on whether they work a 2, 4, or 6 hour work day.  Just a thought.  Perhaps the others will have some ideas for you as well.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    • Marked as answer by Dominic Moss Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:11 PM
    Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:43 AM
    Moderator
  • Dale - thanks for your swift response, your words of wisdom are as always most welcome.

    I guess we don't live in a perfect world or at least one so tightly controlled as some of the settings for Timesheets might suggest. The fact that timesheets show greyed out days for non-working time based upon a resources base calendar is of some benefit in this case, guiding users to book time only to their "official" days of working. As you say process and a degree of judgement should be applied with timesheets.

    In effect setting a minimum of more than 0 hours looks to be problematic rather than beneficial. It will be interesting to see if anyone else has a view or suggestion on this topic.


    Dominic Moss | MAPM Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist | Our Newsletter: PM News Project Server Specialists Project Server PRIME | Twitter: @Twitter | Facebook: @Facebook | Linkedin: Wellingtone

    Wednesday, July 16, 2014 10:57 AM
  • Dominic:

    Don't use the minimum time setting. Use reporting to enforce these policies. Make it a training and compliance issue rather than using Project Server as the enforcer. A good public flogging will quickly bring the non-compliant users into line. :)


    Gary Chefetz, MCITP, MCP, MVP msProjectExperts
    Project and Project ServerFAQs
    Project Server Help BLOG

    • Marked as answer by Dominic Moss Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:11 PM
    Thursday, July 17, 2014 10:32 AM
    Moderator
  • Gary - thanks for the sage advice. I think I will delegate flogging to someone else.

    Dominic Moss | MAPM Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist | Our Newsletter: PM News Project Server Specialists Project Server PRIME | Twitter: @Twitter | Facebook: @Facebook | Linkedin: Wellingtone

    Thursday, July 17, 2014 1:11 PM